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Ambleside Online is a free homeschool curriculum that uses Charlotte Mason's classically-based principles to prepare children for a life of rich relationships with everything around them: God, humanity, and the natural world. Our detailed schedules,
Answers in Genesis is an apologetics ministry, dedicated to helping Christians defend their faith and proclaim the good news of Jesus Christ effectively.
Homeschool science curriculum for junior high students written by Ph-D level scientists that are also homeschool parents.
Exhibits focus on early childhood development and the three themes: arts, culture, and science. Offers admission, program, and membership information.
Connecticut's adventure in art and science. Planetarium shows daily, the challenger learning center, hands-on science and art exhibits, and school programs.
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The Water Cycle Experiment // Science with Delaney //  Master Books Homeschool Curriculum Join Delaney in learning how the water cycle works (Week 26). This hands-on learning experiment is from Adventures in the Physical World (Level 2) by Master ...
Fun science experiment for children|At Home|Homeschool Hello everyone we have made another creation for you to see. We hope you enjoy the video. This is a fun experiment for children to do home. Today, we are ...
Summer Reading Plans // Homeschool Read Alouds and Independent Reading // What am I Reading? Hi, Friends! Welcome to our Summer Reading plans. I include what we are planning to read in our homeschool for history and science as well as fun books for ...
SCIENCE + NATURE BOOK RESOURCES | HOMESCHOOL 2021 - 2022 Hi Mama Friends! In this episode I am sharing all of our science and nature book resources for homeschool 2021 - 2022. MORE ON HOMESCHOOL OUR ...
Do away with homeschool stereotypes 20 years ago homeschoolers were generally at home full time with their children using programs and curriculum born out of the same community. As time went ...
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News

News from the Library of CongressLibrary to Reopen Four Reading Rooms June 2 Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden with Janice Ruth, chief of the Manuscript Division, masked and ready for the arrival of researchers. Beginning Tuesday, June 1, 2021, the Library of Congress will reopen four reading rooms to allow research access for a limited number of registered readers by appointment only.This represents the first step in the Library's plan to gradually resume on-site public services and access, while incorporating proven health and safety policies and procedures. The Library expects to resume additional reading room services as conditions allow, followed by a return of limited, ticketed public access to Library buildings this summer.Read more: loc.gov/item/prn-21-024/ Remembering the Fallen: Memorial DayThis Memorial Day, we commemorate those who have died in service with these looks into our collections:Remembering the Fallen in PhotographsWalt Whitman at Memorial DayCivil War Nurse Clara Barton: A Memorial Day StoryMemorial Day The Tulsa Race Massacre: 100th Years AfterThis week marks the 100th anniversary of the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre, in which a white mob invaded and burned to ashes the thriving African American district withinin Tulsa, Oklahoma, known as Greenwood, so prosperous at the time to have been called "the Black Wall Street."It was, then and now, among the bloodiest outbreaks of racist violence in U.S. history. The official tally of the dead has varied from 36 to nearly 300. White fatalities are documented at 13. Some 35 square blocks of Black-owned homes, businesses, and churches were torched; thousands of Black Tulsans were left homeless – and yet no local, state or federal agency ever pursued prosecutions. The event was so quickly dismissed by local officials that today, a century later, several local organizations are still investigating reports of mass graves.The Library has assembled these resources to help you conduct your own research about the Tulsa Race Massacre with Library collections:Racial Massacres and the Red Summer of 1919Tulsa Race Massacre: Topics in Chronicling AmericaAlso, several Library of Congress blogs guide you through different aspects of this staggering tragedy:How to Research the 1921 Tulsa Race MassacreTulsa Race Massacre: Newspaper Complicity and CoverageFor Teachers: Exploring the Impact of the Tulsa Race MassacreThe Tulsa Race Massacre: Relief and the Role of the American Red CrossAlso, follow #Tulsa100 on the social media channels of the Library and the museums of the Smithsonian Institution through June 1, the National Day of Remembrance, to learn more.Tulsa World newspaper page Asian Pacific American Heritage MonthMay is Asian American and Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander Heritage Month. The Library of Congress, National Archives and Records Administration, National Endowment for the Humanities, National Gallery of Art, National Park Service, Smithsonian Institution and United States Holocaust Memorial Museum join in paying tribute to the generations of Asian and Pacific Islanders who have enriched America's history and are instrumental in its future success. Visit this joint web portal highlighting collections, resources and events: asianpacificheritage.govCelebrating Asian American and Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander Heritage Month: Blog Posts from Around the LibraryChinese Americans and the Gold RushKing David Kālakaua: Royal FolkloristTeaching the Japanese Tea Ceremony: Mine Somi KuboseNative Hawaiian LawRecognizing the Service of Asian Pacific American VeteransHomegrown Plus Concert: Ann YaoTragedy and Transformation: Looking at San Francisco's Chinatown with Primary SourcesJim Lee & Asian American SuperheroesVideo: Jim Lee and Asian American SuperheroesDC Chief Creative Officer and Publisher Jim Lee discussed his work in celebration of Asian-Pacific American Heritage Month. He appeared in conversation with illustrator Bernard Chang ("Generations Forged") and writers Sarah Kuhn ("Shadow of the Batgirl") and Minh Lê ("Green Lantern: Legacy"). This event was moderated by former National Ambassador for Young People's Literature Gene Luen Yang ("Superman Smashes the Klan").Watch it now: loc.gov/item/webcast-9784/ Kumulua Hawaiian Imprint Collection: A Resource GuideThe Rare Book and Special Collections Division holds an important collection of early Hawaiian imprints, dating from 1822 when printing first started in the Islands to about 1860. The 275 books and pamphlets forming the Hawaiian Imprint Collection consist largely of nineteenth-century school books, religious texts, and government documents and include some of the earliest works printed in Oahu and Maui. Many of these items are only known to exist in only a few copies in research Libraries around the world, often with no other copy in the Continental United States.guides.loc.gov/early-hawaiian-imprints/ Jewish American Heritage MonthMay is Jewish American Heritage Month. The Library of Congress, National Archives and Records Administration, National Endowment for the Humanities, National Gallery of Art, National Park Service and United States Holocaust Memorial Museum join in paying tribute to the generations of Jewish Americans who helped form the fabric of American history, culture and society. Visit this joint web portal highlighting collections, resources and events: jewishheritagemonth.govCelebrating Jewish American Heritage Month: Blog Posts from Around the LibraryAmerican Yiddish RadioRoman Totenberg: A Symphony of a LifeExploring Buildings by Louis I. Kahn in the Historic American Buildings SurveyFrancis Salvador, the First Jewish Member of a Legislative Assembly in American HistoryImagining the U.S. Immigrant Musical TheaterSimon Sobeloff and Jewish BaltimorePublic Service Recognition WeekThe Library celebrated its employees and the hard work and dedication of the Federal workforce during Public Service Recognition Week, May 2-8, 2021.More than 3,200 people work at the Library of Congress, and our staff includes world-class experts and scholars in a vast number of fields — U.S. and world history, literature, book-binding, films, folklore, maps, manuscripts, printing, photography, maps — and the art and science of keeping all of those available to the public while also preserving them for centuries to come. Sure, we have great librarians, but also chemists, film preservationists, and, in the case of the papers of Alexander Hamilton, scientists who used hyperspectral imaging to uncover long-hidden lines of text.Watch each short video in a series of Library staff talking about their work.Literary Series Programs for June 2021The Library of Congress continues its series of online literary events. All programs will be virtual and premiere on the Library's Facebook page and its YouTube site (with captions).Thursday, June 10, 7 p.m.: Made at the Library with Paul Hendrickson. Author of “Plagued by Fire: The Dreams and Furies of Frank Lloyd Wright,” Hendrickson discusses how his book was “made” through his use of the unparalleled collections of the Library of Congress. According to Hendrickson, Wright was plagued by fire both literally and metaphorically throughout his life.Thursday, June 24, 7 p.m.: Behind the Book: Great American Translators with Nobel Prize in Literature recipient Mario Vargas Llosa and his longtime Spanish-to-English translator, Edith Grossman. Throughout her celebrated career, Grossman has also translated works of other writers such as Gabriel Garcia Márquez, Mayra Montero and Miguel de Cervantes.Read full details here: loc.gov/item/prn-21-023/A panoramic shot of the Library of Congress with the sun setting in the backgroundWe are more grateful than ever for all that you do to keep us strong. Whether you support the Library with a gift or simply by spreading the word about what we do, you help us in our mission to connect millions of people around the world with the stories of our collective past, present, and future.If you haven't yet had a chance to give and you're in a position to donate, please consider making a gift at loc.gov/donate/.
Three renowned researchers in digital humanities and computer science are joining forces with the Library of Congress on three inaugural Computing Cultural Heritage in the Cloud projects, exploring how biblical quotations, photographic styles and “fuzzy searches” reveal more about the collections in the world’s largest Library than first meets the eye.Supported by a $1 million grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation awarded in 2019, the initiative combines cutting edge technology with the Library’s vast collections to support digital humanities research at scale.Click here for more information.
It seems obvious, but in this day and age, it bears repeating: A father is not just a parent. He is a male parent who contributes things to his child's life and development that are unique as a father. A mother can never replace a father in a child's life – and vice versa.It's one of the great lies of today's culture that moms and dads are interchangeable. In fact, the social science confirms what most every generation knew instinctively since time began.The post What Every Father Needs to Teach His Son and Daughter appeared first on Jim Daly.
CBSE CLASS 12 We provides world class E-learning content for CBSE Class 12 students which help them to learn their Subjects in easiest way and in animated form. We focus on student's problems and to provide solutions in best possible way.We are covering all courses related to CBSE Class 12 Physics Maths Chemistry Biology Commerce Computer Science We also provide Sample papers, solutions, articles on...
Watch these videos just added to the Library of Congress website.2020 Library of Congress National Book FestivalThe National Book Festival continues! Curl up this weekend and watch your favorite authors in newly-released Q&A sessions on these stages:Children's AuthorsDon TateJon Scieszka & Steven WeinbergBarb RosenstockKate DiCamillo & Ann PatchettPam Muñoz RyanAngela DominguezK.A. HoltDeborah HopkinsonKwame MbaliaJessica & Parker CurryJerry CraftChelsea ClintonTeen AuthorsBecky Albertalli & Aisha SaeedGene Luen YangJason ReynoldsMike CuratoFamily, Food & FieldBill BufordJesse DoughertyBruce FeilerDavid KampJudith Warner & Esther WojcickiGail CollinsFiction & Genre FictionKali Fajardo-AnstineJohn GrishamJames McBrideIshmael Beah & Maaza MengisteColson WhiteheadEmily St. John MandelAlaya Dawn JohnsonDavid IgnatiusHistory & BiographyHarold Holzer, Ted Widmer & Kai BirdErica Armstrong DunbarEric FonerHeather Cox RichardsonDavid RubensteinPoetry & ProseJuan Felipe Herrera & Robert PinskyElizabeth TallentScienceKatherine EbanEdward D. MelilloLeland Melvin & Jonathan EllerUnderstanding Our WorldJames A. RobinsonHaben GirmaChristopher Caldwell & Thomas FrankDaniel MarkovitsBarton Gellman, David Ignatius & Thomas RidHomegrown from Home 2020Our stay-at-home summer folklife series included talks with the artists. Here are two newly-available chats.Conversation with Joe JencksConversation with Alasdair Fraser and Natalie Haas Ron Howard & J.D. Vance on "Hillbilly Elegy" Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden spoke with film director Ron Howard and J.D. Vance, author of "Hillbilly Elegy: A Memoir of a Family and Culture in Crisis," about the creative process of bringing the book to the screen with the release of the new film, "Hillbilly Elegy."Celebrating Beethoven at 250 at the Library of Congress The Library's Raymond White discussed some of the Beethoven treasures held in the music division of the Library of Congress. The People's Art Julie Goldsmith discussed "The People's Art: The Chicago Tribune's Transformation of Visual Journalism and Printing in the 20th Century."
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