Home »

Search Result

Search Results for Resources

Links

Get educated. Be encouraged. Join the CHF email community for free resources, weekly encouragement, and real life advice from Christian homeschool families!
Worksheet library offers 1000s of grade level k-6 standard based worksheets for all subject areas.
Resources, curriculum reviews, guidelines, and forums for nonreligious homeschoolers.
Provides unit studies, games, forum, local resources, and a weekly newsletter.
Free resources for parents and teachers to help children master spelling concepts. Lesson plans, free printable spelling lists, teaching tips, and remedial help.
Show all results in links

Videos

OUR SPANISH BOOKS | HOMESCHOOL MOM OF 5 | CHARLOTTE MASON I got asked if I would do a more in-depth video of the Spanish resources I picked out for next school year. So today, I am showing what they are along with ...
SCIENCE + NATURE BOOK RESOURCES | HOMESCHOOL 2021 - 2022 Hi Mama Friends! In this episode I am sharing all of our science and nature book resources for homeschool 2021 - 2022. MORE ON HOMESCHOOL OUR ...
Homeschool Curriculum 2021-2022 Our resources for 4th grade, Kindergarten, and PK 3 in our Charlotte Mason Classical Christian homeschool. To see our spines for our family read alouds ...
Dividing Decimals | Math Tips and Tricks | Math Resources | Homeschool Math | Math Help Videos shorts #decimals #dividing #mathhelp #homeschoolmath #mathtutorials #mathtips In this short video, I show you how to do division when you have decimals.
Top Curriculum Resources for New Homeschool Parents Top Curriculum Resources for New Homeschool Parents Here are my best resources for finding and planning curricula for new homeschool parents or those ...
Show all results in videos 

News

News from the Library of CongressLibrary to Reopen Four Reading Rooms June 2 Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden with Janice Ruth, chief of the Manuscript Division, masked and ready for the arrival of researchers. Beginning Tuesday, June 1, 2021, the Library of Congress will reopen four reading rooms to allow research access for a limited number of registered readers by appointment only.This represents the first step in the Library's plan to gradually resume on-site public services and access, while incorporating proven health and safety policies and procedures. The Library expects to resume additional reading room services as conditions allow, followed by a return of limited, ticketed public access to Library buildings this summer.Read more: loc.gov/item/prn-21-024/ Remembering the Fallen: Memorial DayThis Memorial Day, we commemorate those who have died in service with these looks into our collections:Remembering the Fallen in PhotographsWalt Whitman at Memorial DayCivil War Nurse Clara Barton: A Memorial Day StoryMemorial Day The Tulsa Race Massacre: 100th Years AfterThis week marks the 100th anniversary of the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre, in which a white mob invaded and burned to ashes the thriving African American district withinin Tulsa, Oklahoma, known as Greenwood, so prosperous at the time to have been called "the Black Wall Street."It was, then and now, among the bloodiest outbreaks of racist violence in U.S. history. The official tally of the dead has varied from 36 to nearly 300. White fatalities are documented at 13. Some 35 square blocks of Black-owned homes, businesses, and churches were torched; thousands of Black Tulsans were left homeless – and yet no local, state or federal agency ever pursued prosecutions. The event was so quickly dismissed by local officials that today, a century later, several local organizations are still investigating reports of mass graves.The Library has assembled these resources to help you conduct your own research about the Tulsa Race Massacre with Library collections:Racial Massacres and the Red Summer of 1919Tulsa Race Massacre: Topics in Chronicling AmericaAlso, several Library of Congress blogs guide you through different aspects of this staggering tragedy:How to Research the 1921 Tulsa Race MassacreTulsa Race Massacre: Newspaper Complicity and CoverageFor Teachers: Exploring the Impact of the Tulsa Race MassacreThe Tulsa Race Massacre: Relief and the Role of the American Red CrossAlso, follow #Tulsa100 on the social media channels of the Library and the museums of the Smithsonian Institution through June 1, the National Day of Remembrance, to learn more.Tulsa World newspaper page Asian Pacific American Heritage MonthMay is Asian American and Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander Heritage Month. The Library of Congress, National Archives and Records Administration, National Endowment for the Humanities, National Gallery of Art, National Park Service, Smithsonian Institution and United States Holocaust Memorial Museum join in paying tribute to the generations of Asian and Pacific Islanders who have enriched America's history and are instrumental in its future success. Visit this joint web portal highlighting collections, resources and events: asianpacificheritage.govCelebrating Asian American and Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander Heritage Month: Blog Posts from Around the LibraryChinese Americans and the Gold RushKing David Kālakaua: Royal FolkloristTeaching the Japanese Tea Ceremony: Mine Somi KuboseNative Hawaiian LawRecognizing the Service of Asian Pacific American VeteransHomegrown Plus Concert: Ann YaoTragedy and Transformation: Looking at San Francisco's Chinatown with Primary SourcesJim Lee & Asian American SuperheroesVideo: Jim Lee and Asian American SuperheroesDC Chief Creative Officer and Publisher Jim Lee discussed his work in celebration of Asian-Pacific American Heritage Month. He appeared in conversation with illustrator Bernard Chang ("Generations Forged") and writers Sarah Kuhn ("Shadow of the Batgirl") and Minh Lê ("Green Lantern: Legacy"). This event was moderated by former National Ambassador for Young People's Literature Gene Luen Yang ("Superman Smashes the Klan").Watch it now: loc.gov/item/webcast-9784/ Kumulua Hawaiian Imprint Collection: A Resource GuideThe Rare Book and Special Collections Division holds an important collection of early Hawaiian imprints, dating from 1822 when printing first started in the Islands to about 1860. The 275 books and pamphlets forming the Hawaiian Imprint Collection consist largely of nineteenth-century school books, religious texts, and government documents and include some of the earliest works printed in Oahu and Maui. Many of these items are only known to exist in only a few copies in research Libraries around the world, often with no other copy in the Continental United States.guides.loc.gov/early-hawaiian-imprints/ Jewish American Heritage MonthMay is Jewish American Heritage Month. The Library of Congress, National Archives and Records Administration, National Endowment for the Humanities, National Gallery of Art, National Park Service and United States Holocaust Memorial Museum join in paying tribute to the generations of Jewish Americans who helped form the fabric of American history, culture and society. Visit this joint web portal highlighting collections, resources and events: jewishheritagemonth.govCelebrating Jewish American Heritage Month: Blog Posts from Around the LibraryAmerican Yiddish RadioRoman Totenberg: A Symphony of a LifeExploring Buildings by Louis I. Kahn in the Historic American Buildings SurveyFrancis Salvador, the First Jewish Member of a Legislative Assembly in American HistoryImagining the U.S. Immigrant Musical TheaterSimon Sobeloff and Jewish BaltimorePublic Service Recognition WeekThe Library celebrated its employees and the hard work and dedication of the Federal workforce during Public Service Recognition Week, May 2-8, 2021.More than 3,200 people work at the Library of Congress, and our staff includes world-class experts and scholars in a vast number of fields — U.S. and world history, literature, book-binding, films, folklore, maps, manuscripts, printing, photography, maps — and the art and science of keeping all of those available to the public while also preserving them for centuries to come. Sure, we have great librarians, but also chemists, film preservationists, and, in the case of the papers of Alexander Hamilton, scientists who used hyperspectral imaging to uncover long-hidden lines of text.Watch each short video in a series of Library staff talking about their work.Literary Series Programs for June 2021The Library of Congress continues its series of online literary events. All programs will be virtual and premiere on the Library's Facebook page and its YouTube site (with captions).Thursday, June 10, 7 p.m.: Made at the Library with Paul Hendrickson. Author of “Plagued by Fire: The Dreams and Furies of Frank Lloyd Wright,” Hendrickson discusses how his book was “made” through his use of the unparalleled collections of the Library of Congress. According to Hendrickson, Wright was plagued by fire both literally and metaphorically throughout his life.Thursday, June 24, 7 p.m.: Behind the Book: Great American Translators with Nobel Prize in Literature recipient Mario Vargas Llosa and his longtime Spanish-to-English translator, Edith Grossman. Throughout her celebrated career, Grossman has also translated works of other writers such as Gabriel Garcia Márquez, Mayra Montero and Miguel de Cervantes.Read full details here: loc.gov/item/prn-21-023/A panoramic shot of the Library of Congress with the sun setting in the backgroundWe are more grateful than ever for all that you do to keep us strong. Whether you support the Library with a gift or simply by spreading the word about what we do, you help us in our mission to connect millions of people around the world with the stories of our collective past, present, and future.If you haven't yet had a chance to give and you're in a position to donate, please consider making a gift at loc.gov/donate/.
Funds Available for Educational Organizations to Create Curricula, Programming or Conduct ResearchMasthead from Teaching with Primary Sources program websiteThe Library of Congress today announced fiscal year 2022 Teaching with Primary Sources (TPS) grant opportunities for organizations that seek to incorporate Library of Congress resources into educational programs and materials for learners representing diverse professions and communities.The application deadline is May 28, 2021. For more information about the application requirements and selection criteria, see the “Teaching with Primary Sources Funding Opportunity 2021” on the Teaching with Primary Sources Partner Program webpage.
Collage of images of people teachingThe Library of Congress today announced fiscal year 2022 Teaching with Primary Sources grant opportunities. Applications are sought from organizations that aim to incorporate Library of Congress resources into educational programs and materials for learners representing diverse professions and communities. The application deadline is May 28, 2021. Click here for more information.
The Library of Congress’ Labs team wants to learn more about new segments of users who aren’t yet connected to our digital collections and services. We are specifically seeking people who use digital resources like history photos, books, documents, newspapers, music, video, maps, data or websites but don't use Library of Congress materials for the following activities. Formal and informal education - K-12 teachers, guides or tutors that might use digital resources to build activities, lesson plans, or educational games or experiences. Activism and community leadership - People, clergy, organizers or activists who might use digital library-like resources to inform awareness of a community, or cause, its history and relationships.Data journalism, communications or media work -These people might use digital library-like resources and data to produce articles, visualizations, or media for general audience. People who produce data-driven stories are of particular interest.Undergraduate creative / art studies - These people might use digital library-like resources as inspirational material or as content or material that they may re-mix or re-make through their creative work.With the selected participants, we will carry out 1-on-1 interviews (not to exceed an hour). All work will be conducted remotely over video chat. The schedule for the interviews will be based on what works best for the participants. Can you connect us with anyone in your network who may want to participate? Feel free to forward this message or direct folks to this sign up form: via the online application (https://forms.gle/xiaB8Swp9VR9xL1j8). Any questions can be sent directly to me, Abbey Potter at [email protected] Thank you very much for helping us make this connection! We will share the outcomes of this research publicly and it will help shape future directions of our work.
News from the Library of CongressInaugurations Past, Presidential Papers and Pandemic Photo Collecting Dr. Carla Hayden headshot Friends,Happy 2021 to each of you! This year has already proved to be an eventful one.Like many of you, I am disappointed and disturbed by the recent unrest at the Capitol. This was one of the most significant breaches of the Capitol in its history since the War of 1812 when the building was on fire and the Library of Congress was burned as well.Following those events Thomas Jefferson sold his library to Congress, and it remains the foundation of our institution today. I am relieved to say that the Jefferson library, all of our collections, and most importantly our staff members are safe and secure. You can read more about how the Library of Congress survived its destruction during the War of 1812 to become the nation's – and the world's – pre-eminent source of knowledge and information in this past Library of Congress Magazine issue about our history (p.8).As we turn our attention to today's historic inauguration of the 46th president of the United States, Library staffers have published a number of blog posts examining inaugurations past. Find links to those below, and read about the completion of our initiative to digitize the papers of nearly two dozen early presidents. Updates on other exciting Library programs are also provided.Sincerely,Carla HaydenLibrarian of Congress An 1814 drawing shows the U.S. Capitol after its burning by the British Sheet music copy of The President's March Inaugurations Past & Present: Blog Posts from Around the Library“Inaugurations: Stepping into History” – A Teacher Resource from the Library of Congress blogs.loc.gov/teachers/2021/01/inaugurations-stepping-into-history-a-teacher-resource-from-the-library-of-congress/Selected Resources for Parents on Inaugurations, the Presidency, and Civic Engagement blogs.loc.gov/families/2021/01/resources-civics-inaugurations/Weathering the Weather on Inauguration Day blogs.loc.gov/inside_adams/2021/01/inaugural-weather/Amanda Gorman Selected as President-Elect Joe Biden's Inaugural Poet blogs.loc.gov/catbird/2021/01/amanda-gorman-selected-as-president-elect-joe-bidens-inaugural-poet/Intriguing Facts about Presidential Inaugurations Past blogs.loc.gov/headlinesandheroes/2021/01/intriguing-facts-about-presidential-inaugurations-past/Presidential Inaugurations Outside of Washington, D.C.: Law and Tradition blogs.loc.gov/law/2017/01/presidential-inaugurations-outside-of-washington-d-c-law-and-tradition/Inauguration Music of Yesteryear blogs.loc.gov/music/2017/01/inauguration-music-of-yesteryear/ Panoramic view of the CapitolPanoramic Postcard of the Inauguration of President Theodore Roosevelt at the Capitol, 1905. //www.loc.gov/item/2008681169/Historic Presidential Papers DigitizedPortraits of Washington, Jefferson, Madison, Lincoln, Roosevelt and CoolidgeThe Library of Congress has completed a more than two decade-long initiative to digitize the papers of nearly two dozen early presidents. The Library holds the papers of 23 presidents from George Washington to Calvin Coolidge, all of which have been digitized and are now available online.Read the announcement and access collections: loc.gov/item/prn-20-085/ A family wearing masks during the Covid-19 pandemic Library Seeks Photos of Pandemic ExperiencesThe Library is collaborating with the photo-sharing site Flickr to significantly expand our documentation of American experiences during the Covid-19 pandemic. Whether you use a cell phone, a professional camera or graphic design software, we'd like to see your images of how the pandemic has affected your daily life and community.We invite you to contribute photographic and graphic art images to the Flickr group “COVID-19 American Experiences.” Library curators will review submissions and select images to feature in Flickr galleries and to preserve in our permanent collections.More information: blogs.loc.gov/loc/2020/09/library-seeks-pictures-of-pandemic-experiences/Image credit: Family Portrait from the Covid-19 Era by Jonathan Brown on Flickr. Jan/Feb Library of Congress Magazine:The Art of the BookBooks can be more than just words on a printed page; they can be works of art in their own right. This issue of LCM explores beautiful, innovative volumes found in the Library's collections. Also, a newly acquired library offers stunning examples of book design and illustration, and a king-size scroll chronicles Commodore Perry's voyage to Japan.Download now: loc.gov/lcm/pdf/LCM_2021_0102.pdfBrowse all issues of LCM: loc.gov/lcm/Cover of Jan/Feb issue of LCM Librarians-in-Residence Program Deadline Jan. 22The deadline to submit applications for the 2021 Librarians-in-Residence program is fast approaching! This program offers early career librarians the opportunity to develop their expertise and contribute to building, stewarding and sharing the institution's vast collections.The Library will select up to seven applicants for a six-month residency to begin in June 2021. The program is open to students who will complete their master's degrees in an American Library Association-accredited library and information science program no later than June 2021 or who completed such a degree no earlier than December 2019.Read the announcement and submit an application by Jan. 22, 2021: loc.gov/item/prn-20-086/loc.gov/item/internships/librarian-in-residence/A panoramic shot of the Library of Congress with the sun setting in the backgroundWe are more grateful than ever for all that you do to keep us strong. Whether you support the Library with a gift or simply by spreading the word about what we do, you help us in our mission to connect millions of people around the world with the stories of our collective past, present, and future.If you haven't yet had a chance to give and you're in a position to donate, please consider making a gift at loc.gov/donate/.
Show all results in news