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The Library of Congress announced today that U.S. congressional records dating back to the days of printing presses and the telegraph are now easily accessible on mobile devices. With this latest update of Congress.gov — the official website for U.S. federal legislative information — the Library has transitioned over 33,000 bills and resolutions crafted by Congress between 1799 and 1873 (the 6th to 42nd U.S. Congresses) to a modern, user-friendly web format.The Library’s “A Century of Lawmaking for a New Nation” collection has been a premier source of historic legal documents since it was first published online in 1998, serving as an access point to the lawmaking of early America.Click here for more information.
The Library of Congress is offering a new series of grants to individuals and organizations working to document cultures and traditions of Black, Indigenous, and communities of color traditionally underrepresented in the United States. The Community Collections grants from the Library’s American Folklife Center will enable many to document their cultural life and experiences from their own perspectives, while enriching the Library’s holdings with diverse materials featuring creativity and knowledge found at the local level. The funding opportunities were announced today and are open for applications through Sept. 7.Click here for more information.
Register of Copyrights Shira Perlmutter today announced that Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden has appointed David Carson, Monica P. McCabe and Brad Newberg as the first copyright claims officers on the newly established Copyright Claims Board. Click here for more information.
The president returned to familiar turf inside the United States Capitol on Wednesday to meet with Democrat lawmakers to discuss the budget, a massive spending proposal that promises to plunge the country deeper into debt. Since we were kids, we've been told that money doesn't grow on trees, but you wouldn't know that from the way Congress has been doling out dollars of late. Based on media reports, the Senate majority are expected to ask for somewhere between $3.5 trillion and $4 trillion dollars for the upcoming fiscal year. Of course, contained within those trillions are vital and critical items – military spending to ensure our nation's safety, infrastructure to keep America operational and, especially in the midst of a global pandemic, measures intended to protect our citizens' health and well-being. Yet, also included are dollars many liberals and radicals want to “transform” America – i.e., turn upside down and inside out fundamental values and traditions that have distinguished the United States for well over two centuries. Sadly, there seems to be a prevailing philosophy in Washington these days that money will solve any problem, and the more money we spend, the fewer problems we'll have. It's just not true. Take for instance our ongoing battle to eradicate poverty. Since President Johnson declared a war on poverty in 1964, nearly $26 trillion in taxpayer funds has been spent to fight it.The post More Government Spending Won't Strengthen What's Weak in America appeared first on Jim Daly.
The Library of Congress announced today that U.S. congressional records dating back to the days of printing presses and the telegraph are now easily accessible on mobile devices. With this latest update of Congress.gov — the official website for U.S. federal legislative information — the Library has transitioned over 33,000 bills and resolutions crafted by Congress between 1799 and 1873 (the 6th to 42nd U.S. Congresses) to a modern, user-friendly web format.The Library’s “A Century of Lawmaking for a New Nation” collection has been a premier source of historic legal documents since it was first published online in 1998, serving as an access point to the lawmaking of early America.Click here for more information.
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