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Library of Congress: New Webcasts

Library of Congress: New Webcasts

New webcasts of events, lectures and performances from the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C.
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News from the Library of CongressInaugurations Past, Presidential Papers and Pandemic Photo Collecting Dr. Carla Hayden headshot Friends,Happy 2021 to each of you! This year has already proved to be an eventful one.Like many of you, I am disappointed and disturbed by the recent unrest at the Capitol. This was one of the most significant breaches of the Capitol in its history since the War of 1812 when the building was on fire and the Library of Congress was burned as well.Following those events Thomas Jefferson sold his library to Congress, and it remains the foundation of our institution today. I am relieved to say that the Jefferson library, all of our collections, and most importantly our staff members are safe and secure. You can read more about how the Library of Congress survived its destruction during the War of 1812 to become the nation's – and the world's – pre-eminent source of knowledge and information in this past Library of Congress Magazine issue about our history (p.8).As we turn our attention to today's historic inauguration of the 46th president of the United States, Library staffers have published a number of blog posts examining inaugurations past. Find links to those below, and read about the completion of our initiative to digitize the papers of nearly two dozen early presidents. Updates on other exciting Library programs are also provided.Sincerely,Carla HaydenLibrarian of Congress An 1814 drawing shows the U.S. Capitol after its burning by the British Sheet music copy of The President's March Inaugurations Past & Present: Blog Posts from Around the Library“Inaugurations: Stepping into History” – A Teacher Resource from the Library of Congress blogs.loc.gov/teachers/2021/01/inaugurations-stepping-into-history-a-teacher-resource-from-the-library-of-congress/Selected Resources for Parents on Inaugurations, the Presidency, and Civic Engagement blogs.loc.gov/families/2021/01/resources-civics-inaugurations/Weathering the Weather on Inauguration Day blogs.loc.gov/inside_adams/2021/01/inaugural-weather/Amanda Gorman Selected as President-Elect Joe Biden's Inaugural Poet blogs.loc.gov/catbird/2021/01/amanda-gorman-selected-as-president-elect-joe-bidens-inaugural-poet/Intriguing Facts about Presidential Inaugurations Past blogs.loc.gov/headlinesandheroes/2021/01/intriguing-facts-about-presidential-inaugurations-past/Presidential Inaugurations Outside of Washington, D.C.: Law and Tradition blogs.loc.gov/law/2017/01/presidential-inaugurations-outside-of-washington-d-c-law-and-tradition/Inauguration Music of Yesteryear blogs.loc.gov/music/2017/01/inauguration-music-of-yesteryear/ Panoramic view of the CapitolPanoramic Postcard of the Inauguration of President Theodore Roosevelt at the Capitol, 1905. //www.loc.gov/item/2008681169/Historic Presidential Papers DigitizedPortraits of Washington, Jefferson, Madison, Lincoln, Roosevelt and CoolidgeThe Library of Congress has completed a more than two decade-long initiative to digitize the papers of nearly two dozen early presidents. The Library holds the papers of 23 presidents from George Washington to Calvin Coolidge, all of which have been digitized and are now available online.Read the announcement and access collections: loc.gov/item/prn-20-085/ A family wearing masks during the Covid-19 pandemic Library Seeks Photos of Pandemic ExperiencesThe Library is collaborating with the photo-sharing site Flickr to significantly expand our documentation of American experiences during the Covid-19 pandemic. Whether you use a cell phone, a professional camera or graphic design software, we'd like to see your images of how the pandemic has affected your daily life and community.We invite you to contribute photographic and graphic art images to the Flickr group “COVID-19 American Experiences.” Library curators will review submissions and select images to feature in Flickr galleries and to preserve in our permanent collections.More information: blogs.loc.gov/loc/2020/09/library-seeks-pictures-of-pandemic-experiences/Image credit: Family Portrait from the Covid-19 Era by Jonathan Brown on Flickr. Jan/Feb Library of Congress Magazine:The Art of the BookBooks can be more than just words on a printed page; they can be works of art in their own right. This issue of LCM explores beautiful, innovative volumes found in the Library's collections. Also, a newly acquired library offers stunning examples of book design and illustration, and a king-size scroll chronicles Commodore Perry's voyage to Japan.Download now: loc.gov/lcm/pdf/LCM_2021_0102.pdfBrowse all issues of LCM: loc.gov/lcm/Cover of Jan/Feb issue of LCM Librarians-in-Residence Program Deadline Jan. 22The deadline to submit applications for the 2021 Librarians-in-Residence program is fast approaching! This program offers early career librarians the opportunity to develop their expertise and contribute to building, stewarding and sharing the institution's vast collections.The Library will select up to seven applicants for a six-month residency to begin in June 2021. The program is open to students who will complete their master's degrees in an American Library Association-accredited library and information science program no later than June 2021 or who completed such a degree no earlier than December 2019.Read the announcement and submit an application by Jan. 22, 2021: loc.gov/item/prn-20-086/loc.gov/item/internships/librarian-in-residence/A panoramic shot of the Library of Congress with the sun setting in the backgroundWe are more grateful than ever for all that you do to keep us strong. Whether you support the Library with a gift or simply by spreading the word about what we do, you help us in our mission to connect millions of people around the world with the stories of our collective past, present, and future.If you haven't yet had a chance to give and you're in a position to donate, please consider making a gift at loc.gov/donate/.
Collage of still images from films added to the National Film RegistryLibrarian of Congress Carla Hayden announced today the annual selection of 25 of America’s most influential motion pictures to be inducted into the National Film Registry of the Library of Congress. Turner Classic Movies (TCM) will host a television special Tuesday, Dec. 15, starting at 8 p.m. ET to screen a selection of motion pictures named to the registry this year. Hayden will join TCM host and film historian Jacqueline Stewart to discuss the films.Select titles from 30 years of the National Film Registry are freely available online in the National Screening Room. Click here for more information.
November News from the Library of CongressNovember is Native American Heritage MonthNative American Heritage Month What started at the turn of the century as an effort to create a day of recognition for the significant contributions the first Americans made to the establishment and growth of the U.S., has resulted in a month being designated for that purpose.The Library of Congress, National Archives and Records Administration, National Endowment for the Humanities, National Gallery of Art, National Park Service, Smithsonian Institution and United States Holocaust Memorial Museum join in paying tribute to the rich ancestry and traditions of Native Americans with this joint web portal highlighting collections, resources and events: nativeamericanheritagemonth.gov/ Living Nations Living Words Living Nations, Living WordsEarlier this month, Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden appointed U.S. Poet Laureate Joy Harjo to a third term, making Harjo the second laureate to receive this extension since terms for the position were established in 1943.During her third term, Harjo will focus on her signature project, “Living Nations, Living Words,” a digital project that maps 47 contemporary Native American poets across the country. The map connects to a new online audio collection developed by Harjo and housed in the Library's American Folklife Center, which features the participating poets reading and discussing an original poem.Read the announcement:  loc.gov/item/prn-20-075/?loclr=ealn Living Nations Living Words Everyday Mysteries: Sweet Potato vs. YamJust in time for Thanksgiving, tackle an important question – what's is the difference between sweet potatoes and yams? You can find out the answer to this question and other everyday mysteries by checking out fun science facts from the Library of Congress!Discover the Answer: loc.gov/everyday-mysteries/item/what-is-the-difference-between-sweet-potatoes-and-yams/?loclr=ealnEveryday Mysteries: loc.gov/everyday-mysteries/?loclr=ealnYams and potatoes Library of Congress Behind the Book New Virtual Series: Behind the BookIf you have ever wondered how a book goes from rough manuscript to published masterpiece and how an author rises from obscurity to fame, then a new series of programs from the Library of Congress is just for you. The new series, Behind the Book, provides a behind-the-scenes view of the world of American book publishing, highlighting the editors, designers, publicists, agents and publishers who make the books that win prizes and endure. Series announcement and schedule: loc.gov/item/prn-20-078/?loclr=ealn 12/3 Webinar: "Influenza and Covid19: What To Expect This Winter"The Library of Congress' Health Services Division and Science, Technology and Business Division invite you to participate in a webinar, “Influenza and Covid19: What should we expect this winter?” featuring international experts on infectious disease outbreaks, epidemiology and modeling. This webinar, scheduled for Thursday, Dec. 3 at 10 a.m., requires advance registration, which is limited to 1,000 participants. You can submit questions in advance for the panelists using the Ask A Librarian service. When submitting questions, please indicate that it is for the December 3 webinar.Register Now Library of Congress Magazine Library of Congress MagazineExceptional photographs communicate with viewers in a universal language to inspire, provoke, educate. In the November/December 2020 issue of LCM, Library of Congress curators and reference librarians choose great photographs from Library collections that have inspired them, including images from the dawn of the photography to the present day.Download Magazine: https://loc.gov/lcm/pdf/LCM_2020_1112.pdf Library Seeks Applicants for the 2021 Junior Fellows Summer Internship ProgramThe Library of Congress is seeking applicants for its next Junior Fellows Summer Internship Program, which will run from May 24 – July 30, 2021. This 10-week paid internship is open to undergraduate and graduate students interested in learning and conducting research at the largest library in the world. For the second year in a row, the internship will be conducted virtually. The deadline to apply is Monday, Nov. 30, 2020. Students can learn more information or apply to the program by visiting loc.gov/item/internships/junior-fellows-program/.
November News from the Library of CongressNovember is Native American Heritage MonthNative American Heritage Month What started at the turn of the century as an effort to create a day of recognition for the significant contributions the first Americans made to the establishment and growth of the U.S., has resulted in a month being designated for that purpose.The Library of Congress, National Archives and Records Administration, National Endowment for the Humanities, National Gallery of Art, National Park Service, Smithsonian Institution and United States Holocaust Memorial Museum join in paying tribute to the rich ancestry and traditions of Native Americans with this joint web portal highlighting collections, resources and events: nativeamericanheritagemonth.gov/ Living Nations Living Words Living Nations, Living WordsEarlier this month, Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden appointed U.S. Poet Laureate Joy Harjo to a third term, making Harjo the second laureate to receive this extension since terms for the position were established in 1943.During her third term, Harjo will focus on her signature project, “Living Nations, Living Words,” a digital project that maps 47 contemporary Native American poets across the country. The map connects to a new online audio collection developed by Harjo and housed in the Library's American Folklife Center, which features the participating poets reading and discussing an original poem.Read the announcement:  loc.gov/item/prn-20-075/?loclr=ealn Living Nations Living Words Everyday Mysteries: Sweet Potato vs. YamJust in time for Thanksgiving, tackle an important question – what's is the difference between sweet potatoes and yams? You can find out the answer to this question and other everyday mysteries by checking out fun science facts from the Library of Congress!Discover the Answer: loc.gov/everyday-mysteries/item/what-is-the-difference-between-sweet-potatoes-and-yams/?loclr=ealnEveryday Mysteries: loc.gov/everyday-mysteries/?loclr=ealnYams and potatoes Library of Congress Behind the Book New Virtual Series: Behind the BookIf you have ever wondered how a book goes from rough manuscript to published masterpiece and how an author rises from obscurity to fame, then a new series of programs from the Library of Congress is just for you. The new series, Behind the Book, provides a behind-the-scenes view of the world of American book publishing, highlighting the editors, designers, publicists, agents and publishers who make the books that win prizes and endure. Series announcement and schedule: loc.gov/item/prn-20-078/?loclr=ealn 12/3 Webinar: "Influenza and Covid19: What To Expect This Winter"The Library of Congress' Health Services Division and Science, Technology and Business Division invite you to participate in a webinar, “Influenza and Covid19: What should we expect this winter?” featuring international experts on infectious disease outbreaks, epidemiology and modeling. This webinar, scheduled for Thursday, Dec. 3 at 10 a.m., requires advance registration, which is limited to 1,000 participants. You can submit questions in advance for the panelists using the Ask A Librarian service. When submitting questions, please indicate that it is for the December 3 webinar.Register Now Library of Congress Magazine Library of Congress MagazineExceptional photographs communicate with viewers in a universal language to inspire, provoke, educate. In the November/December 2020 issue of LCM, Library of Congress curators and reference librarians choose great photographs from Library collections that have inspired them, including images from the dawn of the photography to the present day.Download Magazine: https://loc.gov/lcm/pdf/LCM_2020_1112.pdf Library Seeks Applicants for the 2021 Junior Fellows Summer Internship ProgramThe Library of Congress is seeking applicants for its next Junior Fellows Summer Internship Program, which will run from May 24 – July 30, 2021. This 10-week paid internship is open to undergraduate and graduate students interested in learning and conducting research at the largest library in the world. For the second year in a row, the internship will be conducted virtually. The deadline to apply is Monday, Nov. 30, 2020. Students can learn more information or apply to the program by visiting loc.gov/item/internships/junior-fellows-program/.
National Book Festival Presents graphicLibrarian of Congress Carla Hayden and Smithsonian Institution Secretary Lonnie Bunch discuss the future of their institutions and how they remain accessible and relevant during a period of global pandemic coupled with nationwide protests against injustice.Premieres Friday, June 5 at 7 p.m. ET. This event will be streamed with closed captions from both the Library’s Facebook page and YouTube site, and available for viewing afterwards at those sites and on the Library of Congress website.Click here for more information.Â
The Library created its National Book Festival Presents series as a way to bring our annual book festival experience to audiences on a year-round basis. In April, we took the physical events into the virtual realm, offering a series of talks related to the coronavirus pandemic with prominent authors and experts. You can watch all of these talks and special presentations here. The series leaves talk of the pandemic behind with its upcoming programs, which celebrate the 50th anniversary of LGBTQ Pride and take an international scope with the June series “Connecting the World with Words":“Celebrating 50 Years of LGBTQ Pride." In honor of LGBTQ Pride month (June) and the 50th anniversary of Pride celebrations, Eric Cervini discusses his book “The Deviant’s War: The Homosexual vs. the United States of America,” with the Library's Roswell Encina. Premieres Thursday, May 28, 7 p.m. ET"Richard Ford: A Good Story Knows No Borders." Richard Ford, winner of the 2019 Library of Congress Prize for American Fiction and whose work has been translated into dozens of languages, will speak on the universality of fiction. Premieres Thursday, June 4, 7 p.m. ET"Ha Jin on the Legendary Poet Li Bai." National Book Award winner Ha Jin discusses his new book, “The Banished Immortal: A Life of Li Bai,” in which he draws on a range of historical and literary sources to weave the life story of the eighth-century Chinese poet Li Bai. Premieres Thursday, June 11, 7 p.m. ET"Erik Larson on Winston Churchill: The Right Words at the Right Time." Erik Larson discusses his latest book, “The Splendid and the Vile,” which tells the story of Winston Churchill during the London Blitz of World War II, with philanthropist and National Book Festival co-chairman David Rubenstein. Premieres Thursday, June 18, 7 p.m. ET"Poetry Ancestors: How Invention Meets Influence." American Book Award winner Kimiko Hahn and fellow award-winning poet Rajiv Mohabir talk about invention and influence across borders, and how poetry serves as a model for our moment, with Washington Post Book World critic Ron Charles. Premieres Thursday, June 25, 7 p.m. ETAll talks will be launched on Library of Congress Facebook and YouTube channels, on the Library's website, then available for viewing afterwards.Click here for more information.
#3 Subway, Rockaway Ave., Brooklyn. Camilo J. Vergara, 2020. https://www.loc.gov/item/2020632868/To help with understanding of the current global pandemic, the Library of Congress National Book Festival Presents program is offering a virtual multipart series with authors who have written books about widespread diseases and the worldwide response to them. The talks will be available on social media channels such as Facebook and YouTube, on the Library's website, and in some cases on C-SPAN.Two talks in this series "Understanding the Pandemic," are already available, and the third, "Spillover: Animal Infections and the Next Human Pandemic" premieres tonight, Thursday, April 30, at 7 pm ET. The full schedule:“The Great Influenza: The Story of the Deadliest Pandemic in History." This 2004 bestseller has become a bestseller once again. John M. Barry talked with David Rubenstein, co-chair of the National Book Festival, on the 1918 influenza pandemic that ravaged the world even as World War I was being fought on the ground in Europe. Now available for viewing."No One Was Immune: Mapping the Great Pandemics from Columbus to COVID-19." The Library of Congress's John Hessler and Marie Arana discuss the sweep of history from the 1500s small pox pandemic that decimated the indigenous population of the Americas to the meticulous work that is being done now to map COVID-19. Now available for viewing."Spillover": Animal Infections and the Next Human Pandemic." Prize-winning science writer David Quammen discusses “Spillover,” in which he tracks the animal origins of human diseases through the centuries, with David Rubenstein. Premieres Thursday, April 30, 7 p.m. ET"Once Upon a Time I Lived on Mars: Space, Exploration and Life on Earth." NASA astronaut and scientist Kate Greene went into the mouth of a volcano in a space capsule called Mars and spent several months in isolation, in the dark, doing research. She has a lot to say about the stress, loneliness and other challenges of sequestration -- and all from a very novel and unique perspective. Interview by the Library's Marie Arana. Premieres Thursday, May 14, 7 p.m. ET"Why It's Hard to Know Things, Lately, and How COVID-19 Will Go Down in History." Bestselling historian and Harvard professor Jill Lepore discusses how the current pandemic, its effects and our reaction to them say something very real about America in this moment and in the historical record that will emerge from it. Interview by the Library's John Haskell. Premieres Thursday, May 21, 7 p.m. ETAll talks will be available on Library of Congress Facebook and YouTube channels, on the Library's website, and in some cases on C-SPAN.Click here for more information.
Carla D. Hayden, Librarian of CongressFriends,I hope that you are taking care or yourselves and your families as we settle into a new normal amid the COVID-19 pandemic. During these challenging times, the Library of Congress buildings remain closed to the public with all public events currently canceled through May 11. However, while our physical doors may be closed, we are still here for you.The Library’s vast online resources offer unlimited opportunities to discover something new for families, educators, researchers and anyone curious enough to join us.Our dedicated and talented Library staff remain hard at work, remotely expanding online collections, cataloging, registering Copyrights and advising Congress, while also developing new virtual events and offerings that offer new ways to engage. Below you will find just a few ways that you can continue to find excellent programs and content from the Library.Thank you for your support of the Library of Congress, and we invite you to continue to (virtually) engage with us safely at home. Visit our web site for full, up-to-date information about our response to COVID-19.Sincerely,Carla Hayden, Librarian of CongressImage of Dav Pilkey & Jason ReynoldsEngage!Children’s author and illustrator Dav Pilkey shares new activities and exciting videos every Friday. DETAILS: https://www.loc.gov/item/prn-20-026/Jason Reynolds, the National Ambassador for Young People’s Literature, shares his passion for storytelling through a new monthly GRAB THE MIC newsletter and "Write. Right. Rite.," a twice-weekly "Grab the Mic" video series. DETAILS: https://www.loc.gov/item/prn-20-028/Poets Laureate Joy Harjo, Robert Pinsky, Natasha Trethewey and Juan Felipe Herrera talk to Ron Charles of The Washington Post about "The Poetry of Home" in a series for National Poetry Month. DETAILS: https://www.loc.gov/item/prn-20-029/Find more ways to engage with authors you love and connect to the Library’s resources from anywhere in the world on this new, frequently-updated page: https://loc.gov/engage/Rosa ParksRosa Parks: In Her Own Words – Visit the Exhibition OnlineVisit fascinating exhibitions online including our current exhibition on Rosa Parks which showcases rarely seen materials that offer an intimate view of Rosa Parks and documents her life and activism—creating a rich opportunity for viewers to discover new dimensions to their understanding of this seminal figure.https://www.loc.gov/exhibitions/rosa-parks-in-her-own-words/about-this-exhibition/For Educators: Classroom Materials & Online Office HoursThe Library of Congress offers classroom materials and professional development to help teachers effectively use primary sources from the Library's vast digital collections in their teaching. https://loc.gov/teachers/Join Library of Congress education specialists for 20-minute topical presentations followed by Q&A every Tuesday and Thursday 2-3 p.m. ET. https://loc.gov/teachers/professionaldevelopment/office-hours/Image of Washington, D.C.Explore Digital CollectionsDive into the Library’s digital collections to explore just about any topic imaginable. Click through historical portraits and cityscape photographs, listen to sound recordings and oral histories, study American history and world cultures, discover local history and folklife traditions, explore maps, music, manuscripts and so much more. With digitized collections of more than 2.4 million items, it’s all at your fingertips.https://loc.gov/collections/Coronavirus Resource GuideThis is intended as a guide to laws, regulations and executive actions in the United States, at both the federal and the state level, and in various countries with respect to the new coronavirus and its spread. It also includes links to the Library's Congressional Research Service reports that provide information to Congress about the novel coronavirus. In addition, we provide links to relevant federal agency websites. https://blogs.loc.gov/law/2020/03/coronavirus-resource-guide/Ask a Librarian – We’re Open for (Online) BusinessMost of the Library’s reference librarians are now teleworking in response to the coronavirus pandemic. But our Ask a Librarian service remains open! Submit questions to receive research or reference help.More: https://blogs.loc.gov/loc/2020/03/ask-a-librarian-were-open-for-online-business/­Library of CongressSupport the LibraryThank you for being an important part of the Library of Congress family. During these difficult times, we are more grateful than ever for your support. Your generosity helps keep us strong and allows us to be ready when crises lift. Please stay safe. Visit loc.gov/donate and consider making a gift to ensure the Library’s resources help everyone who needs them.Â
John M. Barry on Tonight, April 7 at 8 p.m. (ET): John M. Barry, author of “The Great Influenza: The Story of the Deadliest Pandemic in History," talks with David Rubenstein about the 1918 influenza pandemic, how the world responded and what it can teach us about COVID-19. The program will repeat this Saturday, April 11, at 3 p.m. (ET) and will be available on the Facebook, YouTube and the Library of Congress website.Library of Congress on FacebookLibrary of Congress on YouTubeVideos from the Library of Congress