Home » Library of Congress »

Library of Congress: News

Library of Congress: News

The latest news from the Library of Congress.
News in this category: 30
Bookmark and share this category:  

News

Podcast ID badge featuring woman weaving fish nets in backgroundThe American Folklife Center at the Library of Congress is bringing more workers’ voices from around the country to listeners with the second season of “America Works,” a podcast series celebrating the diversity, resilience and creativity of the American workforce during a time of economic challenge and transition.The season's first episode features Sarah Fortin, a fish net maker in New Bedford, Massachusetts. The episode is now available on Apple Podcasts, Stitcher and at loc.gov/podcasts. Click here for more information.
Image featuring Ira Glass, Kermit the Frog, and Janet JacksonLibrarian of Congress Carla Hayden today named 25 recordings as audio treasures worthy of preservation for all time based on their cultural, historical or aesthetic importance in the nation’s recorded sound heritage.Janet Jackson’s clarion call for action and healing in “Rhythm Nation 1814” now joins other groundbreaking sounds of history and culture among the latest titles inducted into the National Recording Registry of the Library of Congress, including Louis Armstrong’s “When the Saints Go Marching In,” Labelle’s “Lady Marmalade,” Nas’ “Illmatic,” Kool & the Gang’s “Celebration,” and Kermit the Frog’s “The Rainbow Connection.”Watch the announcement video featuring several of the artists and songwriters.Click here for more information.
The Library of Congress celebrates the 2021 National Cherry Blossom Festival by debuting a new video series that highlights both historic and contemporary traditions of springtime flower viewing. Developed to support the festival’s 2021 efforts to “blossom safely,” the four-to-five-minute videos can be enjoyed by viewers everywhere during the festival March 20-April 12 and beyond through the Library's YouTube site and on the Library of Congress website.Click here for more information.
The Library of Congress continues its series of diverse literary events with two-time Pulitzer winner Colson Whitehead; Oscar-winning actor Lupita Nyong’o; a celebration of the world-renowned comic book artist, writer, editor and DC Comics publisher Jim Lee for Asian-Pacific American Heritage Month; and a three-part feature on “the talk” – the conversation parents have with their children about race.All programs will be virtual and available on the Library’s website at loc.gov/collections/event-videos/, as well as its YouTube site (with captions). Most programs will premiere on the Library’s Facebook page.Click here for more information.
The Library of Congress Veterans History Project (VHP) will host two panels on March 19 and March 26 to highlight farming as a viable career path for veterans transitioning to civilian life and to introduce programs that support those who pursue farming.The events, focused on the benefits and challenges of farming in urban and rural settings, will premiere on the VHP’s Facebook page. Panelists and moderators will be available to answer questions in the comments section.Click here for more information.
Three posters depicting life during the pandemic: two women (one a nurse) wearing masks, the third is a picture of a teacher teaching via a computerAs the world marks the one-year anniversary of the global COVID-19 pandemic, the Library of Congress has been collecting materials and documenting this time in history through a variety of initiatives.The Library’s rapid-response collecting since the start of lockdowns and social distancing measures over the past year has included acquiring photographs that document the pandemic’s impact on individuals and communities, capturing artists’ responses to the outbreak, mapping the pandemic’s spread and archiving the world’s response online.Click here for more information.
While Russell Lee’s work is widely known, his story has remained more elusive. A new definitive biography, published by Liveright in association with the Library of Congress, establishes Lee as one of the most influential documentary photographers in American history.In “Russell Lee: A Photographer’s Life and Legacy,” historian and archivist Mary Jane Appel examines the paradoxes of Lee’s dual status as an independently wealthy man and the most prolific photographer of the Great Depression.Click here for more information.
Watch these videos just added to the Library of Congress website.2020 Library of Congress National Book FestivalThe National Book Festival continues! Curl up this weekend and watch your favorite authors in newly-released Q&A sessions on these stages:Children's AuthorsDon TateJon Scieszka & Steven WeinbergBarb RosenstockKate DiCamillo & Ann PatchettPam Muñoz RyanAngela DominguezK.A. HoltDeborah HopkinsonKwame MbaliaJessica & Parker CurryJerry CraftChelsea ClintonTeen AuthorsBecky Albertalli & Aisha SaeedGene Luen YangJason ReynoldsMike CuratoFamily, Food & FieldBill BufordJesse DoughertyBruce FeilerDavid KampJudith Warner & Esther WojcickiGail CollinsFiction & Genre FictionKali Fajardo-AnstineJohn GrishamJames McBrideIshmael Beah & Maaza MengisteColson WhiteheadEmily St. John MandelAlaya Dawn JohnsonDavid IgnatiusHistory & BiographyHarold Holzer, Ted Widmer & Kai BirdErica Armstrong DunbarEric FonerHeather Cox RichardsonDavid RubensteinPoetry & ProseJuan Felipe Herrera & Robert PinskyElizabeth TallentScienceKatherine EbanEdward D. MelilloLeland Melvin & Jonathan EllerUnderstanding Our WorldJames A. RobinsonHaben GirmaChristopher Caldwell & Thomas FrankDaniel MarkovitsBarton Gellman, David Ignatius & Thomas RidHomegrown from Home 2020Our stay-at-home summer folklife series included talks with the artists. Here are two newly-available chats.Conversation with Joe JencksConversation with Alasdair Fraser and Natalie Haas Ron Howard & J.D. Vance on "Hillbilly Elegy" Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden spoke with film director Ron Howard and J.D. Vance, author of "Hillbilly Elegy: A Memoir of a Family and Culture in Crisis," about the creative process of bringing the book to the screen with the release of the new film, "Hillbilly Elegy."Celebrating Beethoven at 250 at the Library of Congress The Library's Raymond White discussed some of the Beethoven treasures held in the music division of the Library of Congress. The People's Art Julie Goldsmith discussed "The People's Art: The Chicago Tribune's Transformation of Visual Journalism and Printing in the 20th Century."
The Library of Congress has acquired more than 200 sketches of the Rodney King police brutality trials against four Los Angeles police officers in the 1990s, drawn by courtroom sketch artist Mary Chaney (1927-2005).Although the focus is on the police officers, some of the sketches feature King on the witness stand describing his injuries while recording of the beating plays at his civil trial against the city of Los Angeles. Others show Judge John G. Davies (1929-2020) and members of the jury.Click here for more information.
The Library of Congress will continue its critically acclaimed season of Concerts from the Library of Congress with an offering of virtual concerts, interviews and conversations with artists and composers, lectures, curator talks and educational programs. The spring series kicks off on March 12 with a performance from the young musicians of the New World Symphony, followed by performances from Scottish pianist Steven Osborne on March 19 and the Dudok Quartet Amsterdam on March 26.All events will be made available at 8 p.m. ET on the scheduled premiere date on loc.gov/concerts, the Library’s YouTube channel and the Performing Arts at the Library of Congress Facebook page. All events of the season are free, and tickets are not required.Click here for more information.
Headshot of Danielle Allen with information on campaign with blue and red accentsA series of new events exploring ideas and actions to strengthen America’s democracy will debut in March, April and May with the launch of Our Common Purpose: A Campaign for Civic Strength at the Library of Congress. The initiative is created and hosted by Danielle Allen, who was awarded the 2020 John W. Kluge Prize for Achievement in the Study of Humanity.This new campaign will feature public events hosted virtually on the Library's Facebook page and its YouTube site, along with workshops for K-12 educators to help educators across the country experiment and create new ways of making civic education come to life.Click here for more information.
Picasso cover art for set of poems by Pierre Riverdy A map of Dublin drawn in a first edition of James Joyce's The Library of Congress has acquired the Aramont Library, a collection of rare books from some of the most prolific authors and artists of the 19th and 20th centuries. The gift by a donor who wishes to remain anonymous marks the first time the Aramont Library has been made available to the public. The latest issue of the Library of Congress Magazine features the Aramont Library and some of the most distinctive examples of the library’s volumes. Click here for more information.
The Library of Congress announced this week that it is convening a public committee to enhance communication with external stakeholders about the technology-related aspects of the U.S. Copyright Office’s ongoing modernization initiative. The announcement was published in the Federal Register.Members of the public interested in participating on the Copyright Public Modernization Committee are asked to submit a current curriculum vitae and a statement of interest addressing the questions identified in the Federal Register no later than March 15, 2021, to [email protected] here for more information.
Important new books on Malcolm X, Martin Luther King Jr., Eleanor Roosevelt and on humanity’s inclination to war will headline the winter literary season of the Library of Congress. The Library will also feature a conversation with the National Ambassador for Young People’s Literature and a symposium on diversity in books for young people.All programs will be virtual and premiere on the Library's Facebook page and its YouTube site (with captions). These presentations will be available for viewing afterward at those sites and on the Library’s website at loc.gov/collections/event-videos/.Click here for more information.
The Library of Congress today announced a new, multiyear initiative to connect more deeply with Black, Hispanic, Indigenous and other minority communities by expanding its collections, using technology to enable storytelling and offering more internship and fellowship opportunities, supported by a $15 million investment from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.The new initiative, Of the People: Widening the Path, creates new opportunities for more Americans to engage with the Library and add their perspectives to the Library’s collections, allowing the national library to share a more inclusive American story. This work will expand the Library’s efforts to ensure that a diversity of experiences is reflected in our historical record and inform how we use those materials to understand our past.Click here for more information.
The Library of Congress today announced the digitization of 46 Malay letters from the 19th century, mainly from Malay kings and Southeast Asian notables to William Farquhar, a pioneering British colonial administrator in Singapore (1819-1823), providing online access to an important resource on the founding of that country.Written in Jawi script, an adaptation of the Arabic script for writing the Malay language, the 46 letters reflect exchanges between Malay rulers and Farquhar, a key figure in the founding of modern Singapore. Click here for more information.
News from the Library of CongressInaugurations Past, Presidential Papers and Pandemic Photo Collecting Dr. Carla Hayden headshot Friends,Happy 2021 to each of you! This year has already proved to be an eventful one.Like many of you, I am disappointed and disturbed by the recent unrest at the Capitol. This was one of the most significant breaches of the Capitol in its history since the War of 1812 when the building was on fire and the Library of Congress was burned as well.Following those events Thomas Jefferson sold his library to Congress, and it remains the foundation of our institution today. I am relieved to say that the Jefferson library, all of our collections, and most importantly our staff members are safe and secure. You can read more about how the Library of Congress survived its destruction during the War of 1812 to become the nation's – and the world's – pre-eminent source of knowledge and information in this past Library of Congress Magazine issue about our history (p.8).As we turn our attention to today's historic inauguration of the 46th president of the United States, Library staffers have published a number of blog posts examining inaugurations past. Find links to those below, and read about the completion of our initiative to digitize the papers of nearly two dozen early presidents. Updates on other exciting Library programs are also provided.Sincerely,Carla HaydenLibrarian of Congress An 1814 drawing shows the U.S. Capitol after its burning by the British Sheet music copy of The President's March Inaugurations Past & Present: Blog Posts from Around the Library“Inaugurations: Stepping into History” – A Teacher Resource from the Library of Congress blogs.loc.gov/teachers/2021/01/inaugurations-stepping-into-history-a-teacher-resource-from-the-library-of-congress/Selected Resources for Parents on Inaugurations, the Presidency, and Civic Engagement blogs.loc.gov/families/2021/01/resources-civics-inaugurations/Weathering the Weather on Inauguration Day blogs.loc.gov/inside_adams/2021/01/inaugural-weather/Amanda Gorman Selected as President-Elect Joe Biden's Inaugural Poet blogs.loc.gov/catbird/2021/01/amanda-gorman-selected-as-president-elect-joe-bidens-inaugural-poet/Intriguing Facts about Presidential Inaugurations Past blogs.loc.gov/headlinesandheroes/2021/01/intriguing-facts-about-presidential-inaugurations-past/Presidential Inaugurations Outside of Washington, D.C.: Law and Tradition blogs.loc.gov/law/2017/01/presidential-inaugurations-outside-of-washington-d-c-law-and-tradition/Inauguration Music of Yesteryear blogs.loc.gov/music/2017/01/inauguration-music-of-yesteryear/ Panoramic view of the CapitolPanoramic Postcard of the Inauguration of President Theodore Roosevelt at the Capitol, 1905. //www.loc.gov/item/2008681169/Historic Presidential Papers DigitizedPortraits of Washington, Jefferson, Madison, Lincoln, Roosevelt and CoolidgeThe Library of Congress has completed a more than two decade-long initiative to digitize the papers of nearly two dozen early presidents. The Library holds the papers of 23 presidents from George Washington to Calvin Coolidge, all of which have been digitized and are now available online.Read the announcement and access collections: loc.gov/item/prn-20-085/ A family wearing masks during the Covid-19 pandemic Library Seeks Photos of Pandemic ExperiencesThe Library is collaborating with the photo-sharing site Flickr to significantly expand our documentation of American experiences during the Covid-19 pandemic. Whether you use a cell phone, a professional camera or graphic design software, we'd like to see your images of how the pandemic has affected your daily life and community.We invite you to contribute photographic and graphic art images to the Flickr group “COVID-19 American Experiences.” Library curators will review submissions and select images to feature in Flickr galleries and to preserve in our permanent collections.More information: blogs.loc.gov/loc/2020/09/library-seeks-pictures-of-pandemic-experiences/Image credit: Family Portrait from the Covid-19 Era by Jonathan Brown on Flickr. Jan/Feb Library of Congress Magazine:The Art of the BookBooks can be more than just words on a printed page; they can be works of art in their own right. This issue of LCM explores beautiful, innovative volumes found in the Library's collections. Also, a newly acquired library offers stunning examples of book design and illustration, and a king-size scroll chronicles Commodore Perry's voyage to Japan.Download now: loc.gov/lcm/pdf/LCM_2021_0102.pdfBrowse all issues of LCM: loc.gov/lcm/Cover of Jan/Feb issue of LCM Librarians-in-Residence Program Deadline Jan. 22The deadline to submit applications for the 2021 Librarians-in-Residence program is fast approaching! This program offers early career librarians the opportunity to develop their expertise and contribute to building, stewarding and sharing the institution's vast collections.The Library will select up to seven applicants for a six-month residency to begin in June 2021. The program is open to students who will complete their master's degrees in an American Library Association-accredited library and information science program no later than June 2021 or who completed such a degree no earlier than December 2019.Read the announcement and submit an application by Jan. 22, 2021: loc.gov/item/prn-20-086/loc.gov/item/internships/librarian-in-residence/A panoramic shot of the Library of Congress with the sun setting in the backgroundWe are more grateful than ever for all that you do to keep us strong. Whether you support the Library with a gift or simply by spreading the word about what we do, you help us in our mission to connect millions of people around the world with the stories of our collective past, present, and future.If you haven't yet had a chance to give and you're in a position to donate, please consider making a gift at loc.gov/donate/.
Applications are being accepted for the 2021 Library of Congress Literacy Awards from Jan. 15 to March 5. The awards are made possible through the generosity of philanthropist David M. Rubenstein. The Literacy Awards — established by the Library and Rubenstein — were first conferred in 2013 to honor and support organizations working to promote literacy both in the United States and abroad. The application rules and a downloadable application form may be accessed at read.gov/literacyawards. Applications must be received by 11:59 p.m. ET on March 5, 2021.Click here for more information.
To honor the innovations and successes of federal libraries, librarians and library technicians in meeting the information demands of government, businesses, scholarly communities and the public, the Federal Library and Information Network (FEDLINK) in the Library of Congress has opened nominations for its national awards for federal librarianship in fiscal year 2020.For nomination materials, visit the awards section of the FEDLINK website or send an email to [email protected] The nomination packet includes the nomination form, selection criteria and a list of required supporting materials. All completed nominations must be emailed to [email protected] no later than 11:59 p.m. on Jan. 15, 2021.Click here for more information.
Portraits of George Washington, Abe Lincoln and Teddy Roosevelt The Library of Congress has completed a more than two decade-long initiative to digitize the papers of nearly two dozen early presidents. The Library holds the papers of 23 presidents from George Washington to Calvin Coolidge, all of which have been digitized and are now available online.Click here for more information.
The Library of Congress has appointed Dennis Clark as chief of Research and Reference Services. Clark brings more than 22 years’ experience as an administrator and librarian to the Library, where he will lead public research services, onsite and online user engagement and the development of the majority of the 30 million items in the Library’s General Collections.Click here for more information.
Collage of still images from films added to the National Film RegistryLibrarian of Congress Carla Hayden announced today the annual selection of 25 of America’s most influential motion pictures to be inducted into the National Film Registry of the Library of Congress. Turner Classic Movies (TCM) will host a television special Tuesday, Dec. 15, starting at 8 p.m. ET to screen a selection of motion pictures named to the registry this year. Hayden will join TCM host and film historian Jacqueline Stewart to discuss the films.Select titles from 30 years of the National Film Registry are freely available online in the National Screening Room. Click here for more information.
Library of Congress National Film Registry at Library of Congress logoLibrarian of Congress Carla Hayden announced today the annual selection of 25 of America’s most influential motion pictures to be inducted into the National Film Registry of the Library of Congress. These films range from the innovative silent film “Suspense,” which was co-directed by a woman in 1913, and Sidney Poitier’s Oscar-winning performance in 1963’s “Lilies of the Field” to the 1978 mega-hit musical “Grease,” 1980’s musical comedy “The Blues Brothers,” and one of the biggest public vote getters, Christopher Nolan’s 2008 Batman film “The Dark Knight.”Selected because of their cultural, historic or aesthetic importance to the nation’s film heritage, the 2020 titles include blockbusters, musicals, silent films, documentaries and diverse stories transferred from books to screen. They bring the number of films selected for preservation in the registry to 800, a fraction of the 1.3 million films in the Library’s collections.Click here for more information.
The Library of Congress will award the 2020 Rebekah Johnson Bobbitt National Prize for Poetry to Terrance Hayes, for his book “American Sonnets for My Past and Future Assassin,” and to former U.S. Poet Laureate Natasha Trethewey for lifetime achievement.The poets will receive their honors during a virtual ceremony Thursday, Dec. 10, at 7 p.m. ET on the Library’s Facebook page at facebook.com/libraryofcongress and YouTube channel at youtube.com/loc. The public is invited to attend this virtual event.Click here for more information.
Artist rendering of reimagined visitor experience, entrance to main hall of Library of CongressThe Dwight D. Opperman Foundation is donating $1 million to reimagine and enhance the visitor experience at the Library of Congress with a new orientation gallery, exhibitions and learning lab, the Library announced today.The Phoenix-based foundation’s donation to support design and construction of the Library’s visitor experience is one of several major gifts to the project in 2020 and was announced just after Giving Tuesday.Click here for more information.