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The Library of Congress’ Labs team wants to learn more about new segments of users who aren’t yet connected to our digital collections and services. We are specifically seeking people who use digital resources like history photos, books, documents, newspapers, music, video, maps, data or websites but don't use Library of Congress materials for the following activities. Formal and informal education - K-12 teachers, guides or tutors that might use digital resources to build activities, lesson plans, or educational games or experiences. Activism and community leadership - People, clergy, organizers or activists who might use digital library-like resources to inform awareness of a community, or cause, its history and relationships.Data journalism, communications or media work -These people might use digital library-like resources and data to produce articles, visualizations, or media for general audience. People who produce data-driven stories are of particular interest.Undergraduate creative / art studies - These people might use digital library-like resources as inspirational material or as content or material that they may re-mix or re-make through their creative work.With the selected participants, we will carry out 1-on-1 interviews (not to exceed an hour). All work will be conducted remotely over video chat. The schedule for the interviews will be based on what works best for the participants. Can you connect us with anyone in your network who may want to participate? Feel free to forward this message or direct folks to this sign up form: via the online application (https://forms.gle/xiaB8Swp9VR9xL1j8). Any questions can be sent directly to me, Abbey Potter at [email protected] Thank you very much for helping us make this connection! We will share the outcomes of this research publicly and it will help shape future directions of our work.
FLASH SALE! $5 Unit Study about Dogs Offer details: Did you know we have new puppies (Trish)? Yes! We got two Great Pyrenees / Anatolian Shepherd puppies a week ago and we are in love! To celebrate Roscoe and Rumble joining our family, I’m sharing about this fun Unit Study about Dogs. A warm, cuddly […]The post DEAL ALERT: FLASH SALE! $5 Unit Study about Dogs appeared first on Hip Homeschool Moms.
So, how do CLEP exams stack up as to difficulty? It is hard to say with precision because College Board and Dantes do not publish their overall pass rates, but the military posts their pass rates online. Military testers can take CLEP or DSST (Dantes) exams for free which could influence their choice to take an exam “cold” or without a lot of preparation. That being said, here are the military pass rates, arranged easiest to most difficult.2008 Pass Rate for Computer-Based Military TestingCLEP/DSST Exam – Pass RateDSST Technical Writing – 94%CLEP Spanish Language – 88%DSST Introduction to Computing – 83% (or 53%)*DSST Introduction to Business – 81%DSST Ethics in America – 82% (or 30%)*CLEP Analyzing and Interpreting Literature – 71%DSST Here’s to Your Health – 70% (or 41%)*DSST Principles of Supervision – 69%CLEP Principles of Management – 67%DSST Business Mathematics – 66%DSST Human Resource Management – 65%CLEP Principles of Marketing – 64%CLEP German Language – 64%CLEP Freshman College Composition – 64%CLEP French Language – 63%DSST Introduction to Law Enforcement – 62%DSST Personal Finance – 61% (or 31%)*DSST Environment and Humanity – 60%DSST Management Information Systems – 58% (or 33%)*DSST Foundations of Education – 56%CLEP Western Civilization 1 – 55%DSST Fundamentals of Counseling – 55%DSST Organizational Behavior – 53%DSST Introduction to World Religions – 53% (or 30%)*DSST Astronomy – 52%DSST Principles of Physical Science 1 – 52%DSST Introduction to Modern Middle East – 49%DSST Business Law 2 – 48%CLEP Social Sciences and History – 47%CLEP Introductory Sociology – 45%CLEP Western Civilization 2 – 44%CLEP Introductory Psychology – 42%DSST Lifespan Developmental Psychology – 42%DSST Human Cultural Geography – 40%CLEP College Mathematics – 40%DSST Criminal Justice – 40% (or 35%)*CLEP Natural Sciences – 40%CLEP Information Systems and Computer Applications – 40%CLEP English Composition with Essay – 39%CLEP Humanities – 37%DSST Rise and Fall of the Soviet Union – 37%DSST Substance Abuse – 37% (or 39%)*DSST Civil War and Reconstruction – 35%DSST Western Europe since 1945 – 35%DSST Art of the Western World – 34%CLEP English Literature – 33%DSST General Anthropology – 33%CLEP History of the United States 2 – 32%CLEP History of the United States 1 – 31%CLEP Biology – 31%CLEP English Composition – 31%CLEP Introduction into Educational Psychology – 29%CLEP Precal – 28%DSST A History of the Vietnam War – 27%CLEP American Government – 24%DSST Principles of Statistics – 24% (or 49%)*DSST Fundamentals of College Algebra – 23% (or 12%)*CLEP Principles of Macroeconomics – 22%DSST Principles of Financial Accounting – 22%CLEP Human Growth and Development – 22%CLEP Introductory Business Law – 21%CLEP Principles of Microeconomics – 20%CLEP American Literature – 18%CLEP College Algebra – 17%CLEP Calculus – 17%DSST Money and Banking – 16%DSST Principles of Finance – 11%CLEP Financial Accounting – 7%CLEP Chemistry – 4%DSST Physical Geology – 2%Bear in mind a few details. These pass rates are for 2008 military on base computer versions of these exams. Some have been modified since these results were compiled. The best way to make an exam easy is to work hard, use the best materials available and study for exams that interest you. And a sure fire edge is being a member of InstantCert.More later on what makes an exam easy.*New updated DSST exams
FLASH SALE!! Garden Unit Study is JUST $5! Offer details: What makes a seed grow? Why do we grow things? What does a fresh ear of corn taste like? How is art related to gardening? Answer these questions and many more with this complete four-week unit study on gardens and gardening. Encompassing the history of […]The post DEAL ALERT: FLASH SALE!! Garden Unit Study is JUST $5! appeared first on Hip Homeschool Moms.
We talk with Tricia Smith Vaught about Pre School, both in the home, and the laws that are sweeping the country to force people to enroll their toddlers.
Part Three of a Series by Kathy Lowers Founder of Considering Homeschooling  If I could take every conservative Christian parent to their neighborhood abortion clinic parking lot for a "field trip," I think I could convince most of them to homeschool. I would only need about an hour. Let me take you there on a Saturday morning… Dachau Concentration Camp Styled Planned Parenthood Abortion Clinic in Houston, Texas First, upon arriving at the abortion clinic, you will witness a parade of cars entering the parking lot. No, they are not Christians who got out of bed to come to pray and save babies there (those are a rare sight these days). Instead, fresh faced teens peer out at you from those cars. Having stood outside abortion clinics in several states for 22 years, praying and sidewalk counseling, I can tell you it seems harder than ever for American high school teens to find a parking space at most abortion mills. Many weekends in the suburbs and in the cities, it is double parking and then some. Now try handing out literature on alternatives to abortion and information on abstinence to these teens. Some of the young people will totally ignore you, others will curse you out, a few may threaten to beat you up or worse. Within that hour of standing in front of an abortion clinic, a teen or two is bound to talk with you. Percentage-wise, they will be from a family that professes faith in Christ, and some will even tell you the name of the "saved" church they go to. You will find that Christian teens going for abortions are often the more elusive ones -- likely to tell you they know it is wrong, but they know Jesus will forgive them after they kill their baby. (Isn't Christianity great?!) You will be outraged to see many cases of obvious statutory rape -- older men who drive up in nice cars, dropping off underage girls. You might begin to realize that there are a lot of parents out there who are totally unaware their grandchildren are being torn, crushed, sucked out of the wombs of their daughters or their sons' girlfriends. How did these teens become customers of Planned Parenthood, et al? Whose children are these who are streaming so cavalierly into abortion mills throughout our country every week, as if they are streaming into a McDonald’s? If you let the government schools have your offspring, then most likely they are yours. If your children are yet young, you have more hope -- please don't let them turn out to be future abortion clinic clients. Realize the public schools and abortion clinics are symbiotic ventures -- the first one gives the sales pitch, the latter is there to cinch the deal. Government schools strip God and His values from every subject, seeding the child's heart with cynicism and nihilism -- which makes a child vulnerable to premarital sex and the temptation to abort any resulting children. Peers and teachers of unknown morals surround your children all day in a school setting. Since you only see your child at night and since they have so much homework, you only really get a few minutes with your kids before they are off to sleep. In other words, your daily influence is negligible. Once your child understands how spending time with friends is more important in the school model of teen life than spending time with family, you will rarely see them on weekends either. Where are they really going? What are they really doing? Are they being chaste or being chased? Like those parents of the teens you saw at the abortion clinic, you are out of the loop, clueless. But if you are a loving Christian parent who can provide a safe, wholesome home where a child can thrive, you should homeschool and teach them the clear message that God made people in His image and that they should have the utmost respect for the unborn. You could even bring your child out to the abortion clinic -- to pray and save babies. And you will not be one to worry whether one of your grandchildren is being done in by some abortionist on a Saturday morning. I hope you will see homeschooling as a great way to help protect the next generation from Planned Parenthood. One group that trains teens in a pro-life summer camp is called Survivors.  I participated in pro-life events with Survivors in the past, and these teens are impressive. Most seem to be from homeschooled families, which is what you would expect.
The late Democrat senator from New York Daniel Patrick Moynihan once famously observed, “Everyone is entitled to his own opinion, but not his own facts.” But not according to Twitter, the social networking service with 330 million users. As I mentioned last week, Focus on the Family's Daily Citizen was blocked from the site and accused of “hate speech.” The tweet in question simply stated, “On Tuesday, President-elect Joe Biden announced that he had chosen Dr. Rachal Levine to serve as Assistant Secretary for Health at the Department of HHS.The post The Censoring and Silencing of Conservative Speech appeared first on Jim Daly.
FLASH SALE! Over 70% off Baseball Unit Study!! Just $5 Offer details: Did you know the Baseball Hall of Fame was established on January 29th, 1936? And baseball GREAT Jackie Robinson was born January 31st in 1919, not to mention Spring Training starts in February… so now is the perfect time to study Baseball!! Join […]The post DEAL ALERT: FLASH SALE! Over 70% off Baseball Unit Study!! Just $5 appeared first on Hip Homeschool Moms.
On the eve of the March for Life, in what can only be considered as a poke in the eye to those of us seeking to protect preborn life, President Joe Biden rescinded the “Mexico City Policy” on Thursday – a safeguard that has prohibited the use of taxpayer money to fund abortions overseas. What happened to your call for unity, Mr. President? In a recent poll, over 77% of Americans oppose this action. Yet as he signed the executive order in the Oval Office, President Biden suggested the policy would ensure healthcare for women. Abortion is not healthcare, but what about the health and care of those little babies, President Biden? Fittingly, an icy, winter wind is blowing across Washington, D.C., today, less than 24 hours before the start of this year's March – the annual commemoration of the Supreme Court's tragic 1973 ruling that legalized abortion in all 50 states. I'm in our nation's capital, absorbing the sights of National Guard troops and barbed wire – but still grateful for those who will be standing in solidarity for the innocent children who have no voice. The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic is forcing this year's March to look very different than previous editions, when hundreds of thousands of people usually descend on this city.The post President Biden Champions Abortion – But the March for Life Goes On appeared first on Jim Daly.
Have you ever tried to push a fully inflated beach ball under the water?You can only hold it beneath the surface for so long. Sooner or later, your strength will give out, and the ball will pop back up.It's a lot like parenting.To explain how, we've invited Milan and Kay Yerkovich back to our microphones to discuss how to develop a deeper connection with your children by understanding their love styles.Milan and Kay explain the coping mechanisms we develop in childhood to avoid relational pain.The post Understanding Your Child's Love Style appeared first on Jim Daly.
Picasso cover art for set of poems by Pierre Riverdy A map of Dublin drawn in a first edition of James Joyce's The Library of Congress has acquired the Aramont Library, a collection of rare books from some of the most prolific authors and artists of the 19th and 20th centuries. The gift by a donor who wishes to remain anonymous marks the first time the Aramont Library has been made available to the public. The latest issue of the Library of Congress Magazine features the Aramont Library and some of the most distinctive examples of the library’s volumes. Click here for more information.
As I've noted before, Big Tech titans are the new emperors of the twenty-first century, wielding an inordinate amount of power by silencing individuals and organizations that don't comport or cave to their political or social point of view.In recent weeks, high-profile, outspoken individuals have been banned from social media, including former President Donald Trump and Mike Lindell, CEO and founder of My Pillow.You can now add Focus on the Family's The Daily Citizen to the list.The post Twitter Censors Focus on the Family's The Daily Citizen appeared first on Jim Daly.
Delicae Gourmet LLC of Tarpon Springs, FL is recalling Thai Peanut Sauce, Panang Curry Sauce, and Spicy Red Curry Sauce, because it contains undeclared shrimp allergen. People who have an allergy or severe sensitivity to shrimp run the risk of serious or life-threatening allergic reaction if they c
If you have been considering homeschooling, let that public school indoctrinated peer pressure kick in... From WND:  A homeschooling movement is sweeping the nation – with 1.5 million children now learning at home, an increase of 75 percent since 1999. The Department of Education's National Center for Education Statistics reported homeschooling has risen by 36 percent in just the last five years. "There's no reason to believe it would not keep going up," NCES statistician Gail Mulligan told USA Today. A 2007 survey asked parents why they choose to homeschool and allowed them to provide several reasons. The following are the most popular responses: Concern about the school environment, including reasons such as safety, drugs or negative peer pressure – 88 percent A desire to provide religious or moral instruction – 83 percent A dissatisfaction with academic instruction at other schools – 73 percent Nontraditional approach to children's education – or "unschoolers" who consider typical curriculums and standardized testing as counterproductive to quality education – 65 percent Other reasons, such as family time, finances, travel and distance – 32 percent Child has special needs (other than physical or mental health problems) that schools cannot or will not meet – 21 percent Child has a physical or mental health problem – 11 percent Parents who report that they homeschool to provide religious or moral instruction increased from 72 percent to 83 percent from 2003 to 2007. Above all other responses, parents cited providing religious and moral instruction as the most important factor in the decision to teach their children at home (36 percent). The second most important issue was concern about the school environment (21 percent), while the third reason was dissatisfaction with academic instruction at other schools (17 percent). Research has shown the positive effects of homeschooling through the years. While some critics say teaching children at home may stunt their social growth, studies indicate homeschooled students fare well or better than public and private school students in terms of social, emotional and psychological development. Additionally, homeschoolers earn higher marks than peers who attend public schools. Academic Leadership, an online journal, cites findings from at least three nationwide studies across the United States and two nationwide studies in Canada. "The home educated in grades K to 12 have scored, on average, at the 65th to 80th percentile on standardized academic achievement tests in the United States and Canada, compared to the public school average of the 50th percentile," it states. Three studies also show that demographics, income and education level of homeschooling parents are generally irrelevant with regard to quality of education in a home setting. On average, homeschoolers in low-income families with less formal education still score higher than state-school averages.
Lake Champlain Chocolates (LCC) is issuing a public alert and a voluntary recall on select LCC milk chocolate products from a determined best-by date range for potential foreign objects. LCC is issuing this recall after a consumer reported finding brittle plastic pieces in a finished product. After
Marci Lall, of TheMaximumWeightLossReport.com, shares his 5 Tips for getting Tank Top Ready in this very entertaining video. Thanks Marci!! Post from: Homeschool Fitness Coach
Are you pursuing a business degree? Do you see yourself as an entrepreneur? Do you need to set yourself apart from other entry-level employees at work? If you said yes to any of these, maybe CLEP Principles of Management is a course for you.The CLEP Principles of Management exam is a 3 credit Business exam that covers material taught in a college level introductory course in management and organizations. It includes operational and functional aspects of business and human resources. This was our first business exam and it proved to be a good place to start. Here are the materials we used, our study method and what you must know to pass.Many materials are available for this course but the good news for the cost conscious collegiate is our favorites were almost all free or low cost. We purchased the REA Principles of Management Guide with the CD-ROM practice tests but found other materials we preferred. We used:Principles of Management (Cliffs Quick Review) Peterson's Online Practice examsInstantCert ($20 a month) plus the feedback on the InstantCert forum (priceless)CLEP Official Study Guide 2009 A good study method always works in phases and this course was no exception. First we read through the Cliff's Notes Management text, made flash cards and took notes from it and the InstantCert forum and studied the InstantCert material. Next we began the practice test phase, beginning with the Peterson's tests (see the post on studying wrong answers for more details on this process) and ending with the CLEP Official test for a final exam. As soon as both students were scoring in the 60's or 70's on their practice tests we made the appointment with our local testing center. We are pleased to report that they both passed but not with the scores they would have liked. Here is their advice:Peterson's test were by far the most helpful of all the materials. We were glad to have taken them each twice, at least.CLEP Official was good but it was not a true indication of what would be on the test.Be ready for 20 or more names of management theorists and their theories, some we had not encountered in our practice materials.InstantCert was great.Find another source, like Wikipedia or another textbook for more of the theorists.Take notes at the testing facility during your test (they provide paper for this). Sometimes this helps with eliminating incorrect answers.Make sure you know and understand:1. Types of Power (reward, legitimate, coercive, expert and referent)2. Authority (functional, line, staff)3. Types of management structure (formal, functional, mechanistic, network, organic, team)4. Types of teams (functional, cross-functional, self-directed)A complete exam description can be found at College Board.Sometimes the best part of an exam is when you are finished, and while this is partly true we learned so much about the evolution of management here in the United States, how we manage our homes, how the church is managed, how employees respond to different types of managers and how unions affect business. Having spent time in a large hospital we have new insight into how the staff was organized. I pray that the Lord uses this insight for His glory in the lives of my children.
Help Science The Great Backyard Bird Count! Scientists can't be everywhere; that's why they need our help. The Great Backyard Bird Count is February 14-17, 2020, and participation is fun, free and easy for all ages. You'll be part of … [continue reading] The post The Great Backyard Bird Count appeared first on Homeschooling on a Shoestring.
News from the Library of CongressInaugurations Past, Presidential Papers and Pandemic Photo Collecting Dr. Carla Hayden headshot Friends,Happy 2021 to each of you! This year has already proved to be an eventful one.Like many of you, I am disappointed and disturbed by the recent unrest at the Capitol. This was one of the most significant breaches of the Capitol in its history since the War of 1812 when the building was on fire and the Library of Congress was burned as well.Following those events Thomas Jefferson sold his library to Congress, and it remains the foundation of our institution today. I am relieved to say that the Jefferson library, all of our collections, and most importantly our staff members are safe and secure. You can read more about how the Library of Congress survived its destruction during the War of 1812 to become the nation's – and the world's – pre-eminent source of knowledge and information in this past Library of Congress Magazine issue about our history (p.8).As we turn our attention to today's historic inauguration of the 46th president of the United States, Library staffers have published a number of blog posts examining inaugurations past. Find links to those below, and read about the completion of our initiative to digitize the papers of nearly two dozen early presidents. Updates on other exciting Library programs are also provided.Sincerely,Carla HaydenLibrarian of Congress An 1814 drawing shows the U.S. Capitol after its burning by the British Sheet music copy of The President's March Inaugurations Past & Present: Blog Posts from Around the Library“Inaugurations: Stepping into History” – A Teacher Resource from the Library of Congress blogs.loc.gov/teachers/2021/01/inaugurations-stepping-into-history-a-teacher-resource-from-the-library-of-congress/Selected Resources for Parents on Inaugurations, the Presidency, and Civic Engagement blogs.loc.gov/families/2021/01/resources-civics-inaugurations/Weathering the Weather on Inauguration Day blogs.loc.gov/inside_adams/2021/01/inaugural-weather/Amanda Gorman Selected as President-Elect Joe Biden's Inaugural Poet blogs.loc.gov/catbird/2021/01/amanda-gorman-selected-as-president-elect-joe-bidens-inaugural-poet/Intriguing Facts about Presidential Inaugurations Past blogs.loc.gov/headlinesandheroes/2021/01/intriguing-facts-about-presidential-inaugurations-past/Presidential Inaugurations Outside of Washington, D.C.: Law and Tradition blogs.loc.gov/law/2017/01/presidential-inaugurations-outside-of-washington-d-c-law-and-tradition/Inauguration Music of Yesteryear blogs.loc.gov/music/2017/01/inauguration-music-of-yesteryear/ Panoramic view of the CapitolPanoramic Postcard of the Inauguration of President Theodore Roosevelt at the Capitol, 1905. //www.loc.gov/item/2008681169/Historic Presidential Papers DigitizedPortraits of Washington, Jefferson, Madison, Lincoln, Roosevelt and CoolidgeThe Library of Congress has completed a more than two decade-long initiative to digitize the papers of nearly two dozen early presidents. The Library holds the papers of 23 presidents from George Washington to Calvin Coolidge, all of which have been digitized and are now available online.Read the announcement and access collections: loc.gov/item/prn-20-085/ A family wearing masks during the Covid-19 pandemic Library Seeks Photos of Pandemic ExperiencesThe Library is collaborating with the photo-sharing site Flickr to significantly expand our documentation of American experiences during the Covid-19 pandemic. Whether you use a cell phone, a professional camera or graphic design software, we'd like to see your images of how the pandemic has affected your daily life and community.We invite you to contribute photographic and graphic art images to the Flickr group “COVID-19 American Experiences.” Library curators will review submissions and select images to feature in Flickr galleries and to preserve in our permanent collections.More information: blogs.loc.gov/loc/2020/09/library-seeks-pictures-of-pandemic-experiences/Image credit: Family Portrait from the Covid-19 Era by Jonathan Brown on Flickr. Jan/Feb Library of Congress Magazine:The Art of the BookBooks can be more than just words on a printed page; they can be works of art in their own right. This issue of LCM explores beautiful, innovative volumes found in the Library's collections. Also, a newly acquired library offers stunning examples of book design and illustration, and a king-size scroll chronicles Commodore Perry's voyage to Japan.Download now: loc.gov/lcm/pdf/LCM_2021_0102.pdfBrowse all issues of LCM: loc.gov/lcm/Cover of Jan/Feb issue of LCM Librarians-in-Residence Program Deadline Jan. 22The deadline to submit applications for the 2021 Librarians-in-Residence program is fast approaching! This program offers early career librarians the opportunity to develop their expertise and contribute to building, stewarding and sharing the institution's vast collections.The Library will select up to seven applicants for a six-month residency to begin in June 2021. The program is open to students who will complete their master's degrees in an American Library Association-accredited library and information science program no later than June 2021 or who completed such a degree no earlier than December 2019.Read the announcement and submit an application by Jan. 22, 2021: loc.gov/item/prn-20-086/loc.gov/item/internships/librarian-in-residence/A panoramic shot of the Library of Congress with the sun setting in the backgroundWe are more grateful than ever for all that you do to keep us strong. Whether you support the Library with a gift or simply by spreading the word about what we do, you help us in our mission to connect millions of people around the world with the stories of our collective past, present, and future.If you haven't yet had a chance to give and you're in a position to donate, please consider making a gift at loc.gov/donate/.
66% off these fun Web-Based, Movement-Rich Lessons Offer details: Movement makes learning fun, and Walkabouts make movement easy! Walkabouts are on-demand adventures that transform math, language arts, and reading content into short, movement-rich activities for pre-K to 2nd grade students. This research-based online curriculum supplement makes it easy for teachers and parents to create kinesthetic […]The post DEAL ALERT: 66% off these fun Web-Based, Movement-Rich Lessons appeared first on Hip Homeschool Moms.
Every married couple faces an Everest – a mountain-sized struggle that can only be overcome by scaling the problem together. In Captain Harold and Rachel Earls' case, the Everest was literal.Harold was a cadet at West Point when he wrote his bucket list. The top two dreams were “get married” and “climb Mount Everest.”In 2016, those dreams collided when Harold told his new bride of only a few months that he planned to travel to the other side of the world and climb the tallest – and most dangerous – mountain on earth.The post Mount Everest and Marriage: Braving New Heights Together appeared first on Jim Daly.
Earlier this week, USA Today published a provocative editorial titled, “Christian nationalism is a threat, and not just from Capitol attackers invoking Jesus.” Senator Josh Hawley (R-MO), our guest on today's broadcast, was singled out by the essayist and falsely accused of being one of those dangerous individuals who uses his faith for political purposes. It's true the senator is a devout believer in Jesus Christ and a strong defender of his country – but that doesn't make him a religious nationalist – that is, someone who fuses his love of God with his country in idolatrous fashion. Many of us cringed when we saw Christian symbols and signs inside the Capitol melee of January 6th.The post Are Evangelicals Christian Nationalists? appeared first on Jim Daly.
Important new books on Malcolm X, Martin Luther King Jr., Eleanor Roosevelt and on humanity’s inclination to war will headline the winter literary season of the Library of Congress. The Library will also feature a conversation with the National Ambassador for Young People’s Literature and a symposium on diversity in books for young people.All programs will be virtual and premiere on the Library's Facebook page and its YouTube site (with captions). These presentations will be available for viewing afterward at those sites and on the Library’s website at loc.gov/collections/event-videos/.Click here for more information.
Is there a word for when people misuse an acronym or abbreviation by appending to it the full word represented by the last letter? For example: PIN number or ATM machine. There are more localized examples: when I worked at Kennedy Space Center’s Bicentennial Exposition (known as “Third Century America”) immediately after high [...]
A fun way to give a gift during the Christmas holidays; another great craft from FamilyFun.com.