Home »

Search Result

Search Results for Chronicling

Links

Blog chronicling the learning activities and projects of an unschooling family across all subjects. Also includes reviews of materials used.
Show all results in links

News

Earlier this month, the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) announced an additional $4.5 million in funding to institutions in 18 states to expand selection and digitization of U.S. historic newspapers for the National Digital Newspaper Program (NDNP), including first-time awardee University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa. Seventeen other participating institutions - Alaska Division of Libraries, Archives, and Museums; University of California, Riverside; Colorado Historical Society; University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; State Historical Society of Iowa; Maine State Library; University of Maryland, College Park; Central Michigan University; Montana Historical Society; University of Nebraska-Lincoln; University of Nevada, Las Vegas; Rutgers University, New Brunswick (New Jersey); University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill; Ohio History Connection; South Dakota Department of Education; University of North Texas; and Washington State Library - received additional awards, each charged with selecting and digitizing approx. 100,000 newspaper pages from their state for contribution to the online newspaper collection "Chronicling America," hosted by the Library of Congress. Since 2005, cultural institutions in 46 states and Puerto Rico have contributed more than 13 million digitized American historical newspaper pages, published between 1789 and 1963 and in 14 different languages, to the collection. Jointly sponsored by the NEH and LC, NDNP is a long-term effort to provide access to an Internet-based, searchable database of U.S. newspapers with descriptive information and select digitization of historic pages. This rich digital resource will be developed and permanently maintained at the Library of Congress. The NEH grant program funds the contribution of content from, eventually, all U.S. states and territories.... Read more about it & follow us on Twitter @librarycongress #ChronAm!!
Today at Chronicling America, we’re celebrating the start of Summer with articles talking about options for a #VintageVacation from our historical newspapers, selected and tweeted by institutions participating in the National Digital Newspaper Program. Join us today and share your own discoveries! Follow us every 3rd Tuesday of the month on Twitter for a #ChronAmParty!
Happy Flag Day! The flag of the United States was first adopted on June 14, 1777. Read a poem printed in the Harrisburg Telegraph newspaper here and follow us on twitter @librarycongress #ChronAm!
While Memorial Day originally commemorated those who died in the US Civil War, during the Great War (World War I) focus began to shift to honoring all those killed during military service in all wars. The National Endowment for the Humanities' Division of Preservation and Access blog this week explores the Evolution of Memorial Day and tips for learning more about the topic in Chronicling America. As mentioned in the post, the Library also provides search tips and examples of articles from Chronicling America describing public celebrations and how the holiday developed over time, including the "Memorial Day--Its Origin" in the May 29, 1919 issue of the Jasper News (Jasper, MO). Check out these useful resources for searching the holiday’s history in Chronicling America's historic newspapers, and be sure follow us on Twitter @librarycongress #ChronAm!
Where did the term "flapper" come from? What did she look like? Find out more about flapper lingo and the "It" girl of the 1920s in our new blog, Headlines and Heroes: Newspaper, Comics & More Fine Print! Sponsored by the Library's Serial and Government Publications Division, the blog will feature stories and highlights from the Library's extensive collections of newspapers, including Chronicling America, as well as our comic book collection and other highlights.In addition to the millions of pages of newspapers selected and digitized by other libraries for Chronicling America, did you know the Library of Congress has more than 29 miles of shelves of its own newspapers? Read more about it and keep following us on Twitter @librarycongress #ChronAm!
Show all results in news