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[Editor: Considering Homeschooling is proud to present this special guest column by Michedolene Hogan of Unique Parenting.] By: Michedolene Hogan When parents send their children to school, they expect for their children to be taught the necessary academic skills appropriate for their age.  Yet, there scope of education is growing at an alarming rate.  Schools have begun to overstep their boundaries and assume the role of the home in many aspects such as the socialization of our children. According to the 2003 Webster's New World dictionary, to socialize means to make fit for living in a group.  This definition is similar to that found in the 1810 Merriam-Webster which states: To make social: especially to fit or train for a social environment.  In order to be properly socialized, children must be able to be sociable, having a disposition to associate and converse with others.  Children must have the ability to join in company or society and to unite in a general interest.  Children must also have the ability to work in conjunction with others in the community and conform to laws.  Children must exhibit respect for authority and an understanding of how the world works.  Observation and practice are the main tools that children employ in order to learn these social skills.  Based on the aforementioned necessary skills one would assume that the best place to learn such skills is in a classroom surrounded with peers and authority figures, right?  Wrong. What kids really learn in traditional public education settings Traditional public schools settings are not as idealistic.  Children may be surrounded by their peers but, these are not the best role models for social behavior.  In schools, children often meet peers who are involved in delinquency, low academic achievement and exhibiting behavior problems.  These are the children who get the most attention from their teachers and as a result, stand out to their peers.  In the end, our children learn an unacceptable concept of social behavior by practicing what they observe.  Despite this reality, the school continues to take the lead in training children for social situations. Raymond and Dorothy Moore, in their research on the validity of Early Childhood Education, determined that enrollment in formal schooling before ages 8-12 was not as effective as projected, but put children’s development at risk.  They presented evidence of a correlation between the following childhood problems and the increasingly earlier enrollment of students: Juvenile delinquency Nearsightedness Increased enrollment of students in special education classes Behavioral problems Early enrollment in schools interrupts bonds and emotional development that children form in the home with parents.  This damage, as found by the Raymond and Dorothy Moore, is not repaired in an institutional setting. Over 8,000 studies were conducted in the 1970’s by the Moores.  In the end, they concluded that, “Where possible, children should be withheld from formal schooling until at least ages 8-10” because, “children are not mature enough for formal school programs until their senses, coordination, neurological development and cognition are ready.” Another theory, developed by teacher John Caldwell Holt, stated that “academic failure of school children was caused by pressure placed on children in schools.”  He declared in 1980, “I want to make it clear that I don't see home schooling as some kind of answer to badness of schools.  I think that the home is the proper base for the exploration of the world which we call learning or education.  Home would be the best base no matter how good the schools were.” The school setting expects children to handle a whole new set of emotions as early as 3 years of age.  At this tender age, children do not even understand their emotions, much less know how to appropriately deal with them.  Children end up imitating their peers, whom as stated earlier may be involved in a number of behavior issues.  The impact of a child’s sociability is an absolutely harmful progression away from positive sociability and self-concept. This progression is best explained in When Education Becomes Abuse: A Different Look at the Mental Health of Children. Here is their explanation of the sequence of emotions experienced by young children in early childhood settings: Uncertainty as the child leaves the family for a less secure environment Puzzlement at the new pressures and restrictions of the classroom Frustration because they are not ready to handle the regimentation of formal lessons (unready learning tools – senses, cognition, brain hemispheres, coordination) Hyperactivity growing out of nerves and jitters from frustration Failure which quite naturally flows from the four experiences above Delinquency which is failure's twin Benefits of Home Schooling Learning in the home is the best option.  Home is the where true learning, exploring the world, takes place.  ‘Learning’ in this case includes not only academic education but also an understanding of the social environment of the world.  Teaching children in the home has countless benefits including: Home provides the proper atmosphere and value system to build upon.  Home sets the example of honoring and respecting authority.  Home teaches children how to be part of their community both physically and spiritually. Children with home as their base of exploration benefit from more time spent with warm, responsive parents, limited time with peers and free exploration under parental guidance.  The parents are in control of the social influences and the child isn't exposed to the whirlwind of emotions that come with early childhood education.  Children build a strong bond with the parents as the center example for proper social behavior and are given more opportunities to be among their community in a guided manner. The National Home Education Research Institute conducted a survey in 2003 of 7,300 adults who had been home schooled.  Their astounding results once again make a case for the home; 71% home schooled adults are active and involved in their community compared to 37% of U.S. Adults from a traditional education background.  76% of home schooled adults between 18-24 voted within the last five years compared to 29%.  The numbers are even greater in larger groups at 95% compared with 53% of traditional schooled adults.  The survey also reported that 58.9% of home schooled adults reported that they are “very happy” with life compared with 27.6% for the general U.S. Population.  73.2% find life “exciting,” compared with 47.3%. Socialization is to make social: especially to fit or train for a social environment.  Children best acquire this skill through the practice and observation in the home, not in the schools.  Raymond and Dorothy Moore recognized this need in their first publication in 1975.  That was just the tip of the iceberg in the research of socialization and teaching children.  Evidence abounds and grows continually to support the home as the best place to socialize our children.  Most recently, the NHERI statistics drive home the essential call to all parents to model their successful and productive adult lives with their children as the best social example to follow. About the Author: Michedolene Hogan lives in a quiet neighborhood of Yucaipa CA with her husband of 15yrs.  Her favorite activities include spending time with her family and crafting fun family activities.  She finds her greatest satisfaction in being a stay at home mom raising healthy children and publishes a bi-weekly newsletter offering advice for building strong families.
[Editor: Considering Homeschooling is proud to present this special guest column by Michedolene Hogan of Unique Parenting.] By: Michedolene Hogan When parents send their children to school, they expect for their children to be taught the necessary academic skills appropriate for their age.  Yet, there scope of education is growing at an alarming rate.  Schools have begun to overstep their boundaries and assume the role of the home in many aspects such as the socialization of our children. According to the 2003 Webster's New World dictionary, to socialize means to make fit for living in a group.  This definition is similar to that found in the 1810 Merriam-Webster which states: To make social: especially to fit or train for a social environment.  In order to be properly socialized, children must be able to be sociable, having a disposition to associate and converse with others.  Children must have the ability to join in company or society and to unite in a general interest.  Children must also have the ability to work in conjunction with others in the community and conform to laws.  Children must exhibit respect for authority and an understanding of how the world works.  Observation and practice are the main tools that children employ in order to learn these social skills.  Based on the aforementioned necessary skills one would assume that the best place to learn such skills is in a classroom surrounded with peers and authority figures, right?  Wrong. What kids really learn in traditional public education settings Traditional public schools settings are not as idealistic.  Children may be surrounded by their peers but, these are not the best role models for social behavior.  In schools, children often meet peers who are involved in delinquency, low academic achievement and exhibiting behavior problems.  These are the children who get the most attention from their teachers and as a result, stand out to their peers.  In the end, our children learn an unacceptable concept of social behavior by practicing what they observe.  Despite this reality, the school continues to take the lead in training children for social situations. Raymond and Dorothy Moore, in their research on the validity of Early Childhood Education, determined that enrollment in formal schooling before ages 8-12 was not as effective as projected, but put children’s development at risk.  They presented evidence of a correlation between the following childhood problems and the increasingly earlier enrollment of students: Juvenile delinquency Nearsightedness Increased enrollment of students in special education classes Behavioral problems Early enrollment in schools interrupts bonds and emotional development that children form in the home with parents.  This damage, as found by the Raymond and Dorothy Moore, is not repaired in an institutional setting. Over 8,000 studies were conducted in the 1970’s by the Moores.  In the end, they concluded that, “Where possible, children should be withheld from formal schooling until at least ages 8-10” because, “children are not mature enough for formal school programs until their senses, coordination, neurological development and cognition are ready.” Another theory, developed by teacher John Caldwell Holt, stated that “academic failure of school children was caused by pressure placed on children in schools.”  He declared in 1980, “I want to make it clear that I don't see home schooling as some kind of answer to badness of schools.  I think that the home is the proper base for the exploration of the world which we call learning or education.  Home would be the best base no matter how good the schools were.” The school setting expects children to handle a whole new set of emotions as early as 3 years of age.  At this tender age, children do not even understand their emotions, much less know how to appropriately deal with them.  Children end up imitating their peers, whom as stated earlier may be involved in a number of behavior issues.  The impact of a child’s sociability is an absolutely harmful progression away from positive sociability and self-concept. This progression is best explained in When Education Becomes Abuse: A Different Look at the Mental Health of Children. Here is their explanation of the sequence of emotions experienced by young children in early childhood settings: Uncertainty as the child leaves the family for a less secure environment Puzzlement at the new pressures and restrictions of the classroom Frustration because they are not ready to handle the regimentation of formal lessons (unready learning tools – senses, cognition, brain hemispheres, coordination) Hyperactivity growing out of nerves and jitters from frustration Failure which quite naturally flows from the four experiences above Delinquency which is failure's twin Benefits of Home Schooling Learning in the home is the best option.  Home is the where true learning, exploring the world, takes place.  ‘Learning’ in this case includes not only academic education but also an understanding of the social environment of the world.  Teaching children in the home has countless benefits including: Home provides the proper atmosphere and value system to build upon.  Home sets the example of honoring and respecting authority.  Home teaches children how to be part of their community both physically and spiritually. Children with home as their base of exploration benefit from more time spent with warm, responsive parents, limited time with peers and free exploration under parental guidance.  The parents are in control of the social influences and the child isn't exposed to the whirlwind of emotions that come with early childhood education.  Children build a strong bond with the parents as the center example for proper social behavior and are given more opportunities to be among their community in a guided manner. The National Home Education Research Institute conducted a survey in 2003 of 7,300 adults who had been home schooled.  Their astounding results once again make a case for the home; 71% home schooled adults are active and involved in their community compared to 37% of U.S. Adults from a traditional education background.  76% of home schooled adults between 18-24 voted within the last five years compared to 29%.  The numbers are even greater in larger groups at 95% compared with 53% of traditional schooled adults.  The survey also reported that 58.9% of home schooled adults reported that they are “very happy” with life compared with 27.6% for the general U.S. Population.  73.2% find life “exciting,” compared with 47.3%. Socialization is to make social: especially to fit or train for a social environment.  Children best acquire this skill through the practice and observation in the home, not in the schools.  Raymond and Dorothy Moore recognized this need in their first publication in 1975.  That was just the tip of the iceberg in the research of socialization and teaching children.  Evidence abounds and grows continually to support the home as the best place to socialize our children.  Most recently, the NHERI statistics drive home the essential call to all parents to model their successful and productive adult lives with their children as the best social example to follow. About the Author: Michedolene Hogan lives in a quiet neighborhood of Yucaipa CA with her husband of 15yrs.  Her favorite activities include spending time with her family and crafting fun family activities.  She finds her greatest satisfaction in being a stay at home mom raising healthy children and publishes a bi-weekly newsletter offering advice for building strong families.
1 pound of pork fat1 pound of pork fat I read an interesting article today on brown fat versus white fat. I have not read the actual studies so I am using this article as a reference only. Apparently we have brown fat which is “good fat” that burns more calories than white fat which is the “bad fat”. This brown fat sits in the neck and collarbone area, women and lean individuals have more of it. It is metabolically active and is most active in infants or when an individual is sitting in a cold room. I certainly hope the general public does not fall for this next “exercise pill”. Please explain to me how popping a pill an sitting in a cold room is going to aid in the loss of excess bodyfat? Society is already doing too much sitting. Stop putting patients on diets and recommending ineffective exercise programs. Instead, get to the heart of the problem -the emotional issues, teach sound nutrition and get your patients in touch with a fitness professional that understands the roll of metabolically active lean tissue. All research on finding a “weight loss cure” in a pill is a waste of money, time and intelligence. I’m personally fed up with it all. Post from: Homeschool Fitness Coach
1 pound of pork fat1 pound of pork fat I read an interesting article today on brown fat versus white fat. I have not read the actual studies so I am using this article as a reference only. Apparently we have brown fat which is “good fat” that burns more calories than white fat which is the “bad fat”. This brown fat sits in the neck and collarbone area, women and lean individuals have more of it. It is metabolically active and is most active in infants or when an individual is sitting in a cold room. I certainly hope the general public does not fall for this next “exercise pill”. Please explain to me how popping a pill an sitting in a cold room is going to aid in the loss of excess bodyfat? Society is already doing too much sitting. Stop putting patients on diets and recommending ineffective exercise programs. Instead, get to the heart of the problem -the emotional issues, teach sound nutrition and get your patients in touch with a fitness professional that understands the roll of metabolically active lean tissue. All research on finding a “weight loss cure” in a pill is a waste of money, time and intelligence. I’m personally fed up with it all. Post from: Homeschool Fitness Coach
The CLEP US History 1 exam is a 3 credit Social Sciences and History exam that covers the early colonial period of North America though Reconstruction. This was our second CLEP test and overlaps material from CLEP American Government, especially the Constitution, Bill of Rights and Supreme Court cases. Students interested in history should be able to enjoy this exam and do well. Here are the materials we used, our study method and what you must know to pass.Available materials for this exam abound and many are good but our favorites were:InstantCert (invaluable for this exam, especially the feedback section of the forum) The CLEP History of the United States I w/CD (REA) - The Best Test Prep for the CLEP Official Study Guide 2010 (makes a great final exam) Peterson's online practice exams (harder than the actual exam but excellent for study)The History Channel Presents The Presidents For this exam we used a combination of texts, videos, flashcards and a few movies from the period. Making flashcards or a power point presentation of the presidents, the highlights of each administration, and the major supreme court cases were helpful to solidify the timeline and flow of the study. Reading through the text of the REA book, while taking notes was important for the first phase of study. Next we began practice testing, starting with REA's CD-ROM tests and moving to Peterson's online tests and finally ending with the CLEP Official exam. The practice testing phase showed us what we needed to study more and Wikipedia is a good source for this because it was so easy to search for the term or person we were unfamiliar with.The major "must knows" for this exam are:Women's issues of the period Reform Movements (both religious and political) Literature of the period Differences betwen the different British colonies Presidents, their administations (along with their scandals) The Constitution, Bill of Rights, Articles of Confederation Slavery and Indentured Servitude A more detailed exam description can be found here.A suprising component about this exam was the time spent on more minor players and issues and less on major figures like Washington. If you need any more Social Science credits and don't mind a challenge think about following this exam with DSST Civil War and Reconstruction. More on that one later...
When you have spent time studying for a CLEP or DSST exam the next step is to gather some practice tests and practice. It is a good idea to find 3-7 practice tests for your subject, if possible. But what is the best method for taking these tests and getting the most out of the process? Here is a detailed description of our method. 1. EvaluateTake a practice test, timed if possible. This lets you know how much you have retained from your study time or previous experience.2. Track incorrectMake a note of all your incorrect answers and those that were right only because of a total guess3. List true statementsMake a list of true statements from the answer explanations. These true statements are either the answer you guessed and its definition, or the question with the real answer, or both. This step really shows you the weak places in your studying.4. SortOrganize these true statements intoa. A list of definitions that don't fall into a categoryb. Big issue charts or sheets. Use one blank sheet of paper for each of these issues (for example, The Constitution or Southern Civil War losses with causes). IEW's Advanced note taking System works well for these charts.5. StorePlace these notes in a 3 ring binder and review them, focusing on weak areas and adding further research (like Google searching or Wikipedia)6. Test againRetake test or take another one7. Repeat until masteredRepeat steps 2-6 until you are scoring in the mid 60's consistently (though we prefer 70's)8. Real TestMake appointment and sit for test (unless your testing facility requires more than a few day's notice)9. Celebrate (hopefully)
The CLEP US History 1 exam is a 3 credit Social Sciences and History exam that covers the early colonial period of North America though Reconstruction. This was our second CLEP test and overlaps material from CLEP American Government, especially the Constitution, Bill of Rights and Supreme Court cases. Students interested in history should be able to enjoy this exam and do well. Here are the materials we used, our study method and what you must know to pass.Available materials for this exam abound and many are good but our favorites were:InstantCert (invaluable for this exam, especially the feedback section of the forum) The CLEP History of the United States I w/CD (REA) - The Best Test Prep for the CLEP Official Study Guide 2010 (makes a great final exam) Peterson's online practice exams (harder than the actual exam but excellent for study)The History Channel Presents The Presidents For this exam we used a combination of texts, videos, flashcards and a few movies from the period. Making flashcards or a power point presentation of the presidents, the highlights of each administration, and the major supreme court cases were helpful to solidify the timeline and flow of the study. Reading through the text of the REA book, while taking notes was important for the first phase of study. Next we began practice testing, starting with REA's CD-ROM tests and moving to Peterson's online tests and finally ending with the CLEP Official exam. The practice testing phase showed us what we needed to study more and Wikipedia is a good source for this because it was so easy to search for the term or person we were unfamiliar with.The major "must knows" for this exam are:Women's issues of the period Reform Movements (both religious and political) Literature of the period Differences betwen the different British colonies Presidents, their administations (along with their scandals) The Constitution, Bill of Rights, Articles of Confederation Slavery and Indentured Servitude A more detailed exam description can be found here.A suprising component about this exam was the time spent on more minor players and issues and less on major figures like Washington. If you need any more Social Science credits and don't mind a challenge think about following this exam with DSST Civil War and Reconstruction. More on that one later...
When you have spent time studying for a CLEP or DSST exam the next step is to gather some practice tests and practice. It is a good idea to find 3-7 practice tests for your subject, if possible. But what is the best method for taking these tests and getting the most out of the process? Here is a detailed description of our method. 1. EvaluateTake a practice test, timed if possible. This lets you know how much you have retained from your study time or previous experience.2. Track incorrectMake a note of all your incorrect answers and those that were right only because of a total guess3. List true statementsMake a list of true statements from the answer explanations. These true statements are either the answer you guessed and its definition, or the question with the real answer, or both. This step really shows you the weak places in your studying.4. SortOrganize these true statements intoa. A list of definitions that don't fall into a categoryb. Big issue charts or sheets. Use one blank sheet of paper for each of these issues (for example, The Constitution or Southern Civil War losses with causes). IEW's Advanced note taking System works well for these charts.5. StorePlace these notes in a 3 ring binder and review them, focusing on weak areas and adding further research (like Google searching or Wikipedia)6. Test againRetake test or take another one7. Repeat until masteredRepeat steps 2-6 until you are scoring in the mid 60's consistently (though we prefer 70's)8. Real TestMake appointment and sit for test (unless your testing facility requires more than a few day's notice)9. Celebrate (hopefully)
Ocala, Florida - Wells Pharmacy Network ("WPN") is voluntarily recalling all sterile human and veterinary products prepared between February 22, 2016 and September 14, 2016, and that remain within expiry due to the Food and Drug Administration's ("FDA") concern over a lack of sterility assurance.
MS Bionic, Inc. announced today that it is conducting a voluntary nationwide recall of all lots of Megajex Natural Male Sex Enhancer capsules. FDA analysis has found the product to contain Tadalafil and Sildenafil.
High Point, NC, Ultimate Body-Tox is voluntarily recalling all lots of Ultimate Body Tox PRO capsules to the consumer level. FDA analyses of this product found it to contain undeclared sibutramine. Sibutramine is a controlled substance that was removed from the U.S. market in October 2010 for safety reasons.
Intermountain Farmers Association (IFA) of Draper, UT, is recalling its 50 lbs. bags of rabbit pellets (item #1220) manufactured between March 14, 2016 and September 15, 2016, because the product may contain higher than acceptable levels of vitamin D, which may cause health problems to rabbits.
55 African American newspapers from across the US, are available online in #ChronAm. Included among these titles are issues of Frederick Douglass’ newspaper the New National Era. In his first issue, Douglass writes “It has been a cherished hope of mine, since the abolition of slavery, that…some new man…thoroughly alive to the great interests of our newly enfranchised people, would arise and establish here in the Capital of the nation a large public journal, which should in some measure serve as a banner on the outer wall of our liberties…I believe the New National Era can be made such a journal…” #BlackHistoryMonth Read more about it and follow us on Twitter @librarycongress #ChronAm!
Primary sources support the study of many disciplines, including both history and geography. One way to help students think about primary sources geographically is to focus them on the five themes of geography: location, place, movement, region, and human-environmental interaction. The latest edition of The TPS Journal, an online publication created by the Library of Congress Educational Outreach Division in collaboration with the TPS Educational Consortium, explores how the five themes of geography can be applied to analyzing primary sources, providing students with multiple perspectives and contributing to greater understanding of a topic.The TPS Journal: Historical and Geographic Thinking contains a full discussion of primary source analysis focused on the five themes of geography, as well as sample lesson plans, additional resources from the Library of Congress, current research on the topic, and more.Want to see previous issues of the Journal? You can read them in the Journal Archives.
The papers of Millard Fillmore (1800-1874), educator, U.S. representative from New York, vice president, and thirteenth president of the United States, contain approximately thirty-five items spanning the years 1839-1925, with the bulk dating from 1839 to 1870. The collection includes correspondence relating primarily to political issues such as slavery, Compromise of 1850, Fugitive Slave Law of 1850, Kansas-Nebraska Act, John Brown's 1859 raid on Harpers Ferry, West Virginia, and congressional politics. Individuals mentioned in the correspondence include Thomas Hart Benton, John C. Calhoun, and William Henry Harrison. Fillmore's correspondents include Philip Ricard Fendall, Solomon G. Haven, and Humphrey Marshall.Click here for more information.
A&H Focal Inc. is voluntarily recalling all lots of the following products because many of these products have been historically tested by the FDA and found to contain PDE-5 Inhibitors (i.e. sildenafil, tadalafil, vardenafil, etc.) which is the active ingredient in an FDA-approved drug for erectile dysfunction (ED) making these tainted dietary supplements unapproved drugs.
After more than two years of remaining neutral in the conflict happening 'over there,' President Woodrow Wilson issues a proclamation on April 6, 1917 to the people of the country declaring a state of war exists between the United States and the Imperial Government of Germany. The first act of war was to seize all 91 German ships in American waters, weighing a total tonnage of 594,696, the news reports.... Read more about it and explore our Recommended Topics by Subject to learn about more about what newspapers reported during World War I! Follow us on Twitter @librarycongress #ChronAm!
It is a nice family movie showing what can be accomplished with hard work and determination. There are no language issues, no worldview issues, and no
Organic Herbal Supply, Inc. announced today that it is conducting a voluntary nationwide recall of all lots of Uproar, Cummor, Zrect, Monkey Business, Xrect, Rectalis, Tornado, Zdaily, BigNHard, Enhancerol Natural Male Enhancement capsules. FDA analysis has found the products to contain Tadalafil. Tadalafil is a FDA-approved drug used as treatment for male Erectile Dysfunction (ED), the presence of tadalafil in these male enhancement products renders it an unapproved drug for which safety and efficacy have not been established and, therefore, subject to recall. Organic Herbal Supply is also recalling Zrect for Women and LabidaMAX. FDA analysis has found these two products contain Flibanserin, an FDA-approved prescription drug for Hypoactive Sexual Desire Disorder (HSDD) in women. There have been no reports of illness to date.
Bellmawr, New Jersey, C.O. Truxton, Inc. is voluntarily recalling lot 70952A of Phenobarbital Tablets, USP, 15 mg, to the consumer/user level. The manufacturer received a confirmed customer complaint that a bottle labeled as phenobarbital 15 mg was found to contain phenobarbital 30 mg tablets.
Genetic Edge Compounds is voluntarily recalling all lot codes distributed between February 2, 2015- May 2, 2017 of GEC Laxoplex dietary supplement capsules, packaged in a white plastic bottle containing 60 capsules to the retail level and consumer level. Food and Drug Administration (“FDA”) analysis has found GEC Laxoplex to be tainted with anabolic steroids and steroid like substances.
Bellmawr, New Jersey, C.O. Truxton, Inc. is expanding their 04/21/2017 voluntary recall, as a precaution to include the following C.O. Truxton, Inc. products, registered NDC numbers and corresponding lot numbers, to the consumer/user level. C.O. Truxton has not received any complaints for the products listed below. however, due to the initial recall resulting from a label mix-up error, out of an abundance of caution, we are recalling all products that were repackaged into a Truxton Incorporated label.
Genetic Edge Compounds is voluntarily recalling all lot codes distributed between February 2, 2015- May 2, 2017 of GEC Laxoplex dietary supplement capsules, packaged in a white plastic bottle containing 60 capsules to the retail level and consumer level. Food and Drug Administration (“FDA”) analysis has found GEC Laxoplex to be tainted with anabolic steroids and steroid like substances.