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My name is Gage, I am 17 years old, and recently I went on a trip with my mom and both my brothers to Florence, Alabama. Florence is a city I had never heard of until I was told I was going on a trip there! We have traveled near this city multiple times on […]The post Escape Rooms Are Great for Homeschoolers appeared first on Hip Homeschool Moms.
Larry and Susan Kaseman are retiring from their Wisconsin Parents Association staff positions. Below is only part of their letter: Susan and I have had a long and rewarding experience serving WPA, Susan as Senior Program Specialist and I as Executive Director. It's been 32 years, and we find ourselves in our early 70's and wanting to spend more time with our grandchildren, do more gardening, take more photographs, and do more reading and writing. We will undoubtedly become involved in other projects. We will also see many of you at the WPA conference in May. Over the past two years, we have worked with the WPA Board to ensure a successful transfer of the WPA work we have been doing to others. We are pleased to say that this effort has been fruitful. Two very strong, capable, and committed women who are long-time and currently active homeschoolers and WPA supporters, will be doing the work that Susan and I have been doing. Beginning January 1, 2016, Pamela Roland will be WPA's President and Jen Lynch will be WPA's Executive Director. Pamela and Jen have worked very well with Susan and me in making this transition. It's also a good feeling to be leaving when WPA is on solid ground. Over the past two years, WPA membership has grown, the conference has increased to over 800 attendees, donations are up, and more homeschoolers are sharing their time and talents with WPA. We expect these increases to continue as homeschoolers continue to support WPA as the committed Wisconsin homeschoolers that we are.It's a testament to the strength of homeschoolers and WPA that this transition of work has not been done in haste, is working so smoothly, and that WPA work will continue to be done with a level of moral and ethical commitment to the principles WPA has established over the years. This feels very good to Susan and me, and our thanks go to Pamela and Jen.And thank you to all the homeschoolers who have supported WPA and Susan and me over the past 32 years. WPA is a grassroots organization and your commitments to your families, to homeschooling, and to WPA have given us strength, energy, and joy.Sincerely,Larry and Susan Kaseman
A brief description plus contact details of various high school homeschool options for South African Homeschoolers, including internationally recognised certifications.
Things to do in Eastern Cape for South African homeschoolers.
Things to do in Kwazulu Natal for South African Homeschoolers
Things to do in Gauteng for homeschoolers in South Africa
Things to do - Garden Route, for kids and adults, outings for homeschoolers in South Africa.
A GED homeschool matric plus SAT score or a letter of admission is an option for homeschoolers to obtain a recognized matric equivalent with university exemption. This page will explain the process.
Top Homeschoolers in World Education Games 2013 My son, Sean aged 12 participated in the World Education Games online this year. He was thrilled to be
In an effort to reduce truancy in Brown County, Wisconsin, police officers are enforcing the county's 1998 daytime curfew ordinance. You will find WPA's information helpful should you be approached by anyone asking questions.If a police officer questions you, WPA suggests you follow these general principles:• Stay calm and be polite.• Know and exercise your legal rights.• To protect your homeschooling freedoms, civil rights, and privacy, do only the minimum that is required to avoid having the situation become more serious.• Make sure any young people who will not be accompanied by an adult while they are out in public in the Green Bay area during conventional school hours are prepared to talk with police officers. Consider practicing with them.• For adults only: Explain that children who are accompanied by their parents are exempt from the Daytime Curfew ordinance. If necessary, show them a copy of the ordinance (see below).• For both adults and unaccompanied young people: Explain that you are a homeschooler and homeschoolers have the legal right to set their own calendars and schedules. If necessary, show the officer your PI-1206 form, including the information you have printed on the back (see below).• Don't volunteer any additional information. Don't outline the schedule your homeschool follows. Don't try to explain that whatever you were doing is part of your curriculum. Volunteering such information may lead the police officer to ask you more questions or report you to a school official or social service worker for more investigation.• In addition, WPA does not advise homeschooled parents to provide their children with written proof that their child has been excused from attending school at a particular time for two reasons. First, using the PI-1206 form to establish that the child is a homeschooler should be sufficient to prevent the child or parent from being arrested. Second, providing such excuses invites more questions.
The application deadline for homeschoolers has been extended. Applications must be mailed by Wednesday, November 26, 2014. (Homeschoolers can use this deadline regardless of the date printed on the application form.)The application form for homeschoolers is almost the same as that for other students with only minor changes because of the way homeschools are constituted. It requires several short essays, one 300-500 word essay, three letters of recommendation, and a high school transcript. The application must be typed.
• Tell other homeschoolers: You are required to file form PI-1206 even if you begin homeschooling after the third Friday in September. (An organization based outside Wisconsin says on its website that families who begin homeschooling after the third Friday in September do not have to file the form.) • Tell other homeschoolers: You are required to file form PI-1206 ONLINE each year you are homeschooling. (The organization based outside Wisconsin states on its website that filing a paper version of the form is an “option.”)An organization based outside Wisconsin has posted inaccurate information about homeschooling in Wisconsin on their website. If homeschoolers take action based on this information, critics and opponents of homeschooling will be able to claim that homeschoolers are not obeying the law. This could easily lead to increased state regulation of homeschooling in Wisconsin, which since 1984 has had one of the best homeschooling laws in the country. Wisconsin homeschoolers are NOT required to take state-mandated tests, are NOT required to submit their curriculums for review and approval, are NOT required to report to school officials, etc. Homeschoolers in most other states are required to do one or more of these. Let's work together through WPA to maintain our freedoms. Let's not allow dangerous and inaccurate information from outside Wisconsin to rob us of our freedoms.
Donna C, the author of Homeschooling Only One, explains the challenges of homeschooling only one child, whether it's homeschooling the last one, the first one, the grandchild or only having one child. Great insight for all homeschoolers.
Tim Lambert from THSC and Valerie Swanson, a homeschool Mom, talk about their decisions as Chrisitans to be involved in politics
MTV is currently producing a documentary for its "True Life" series about young people who are homeschooled.
If you have been considering homeschooling, let that public school indoctrinated peer pressure kick in... From WND:  A homeschooling movement is sweeping the nation – with 1.5 million children now learning at home, an increase of 75 percent since 1999. The Department of Education's National Center for Education Statistics reported homeschooling has risen by 36 percent in just the last five years. "There's no reason to believe it would not keep going up," NCES statistician Gail Mulligan told USA Today. A 2007 survey asked parents why they choose to homeschool and allowed them to provide several reasons. The following are the most popular responses: Concern about the school environment, including reasons such as safety, drugs or negative peer pressure – 88 percent A desire to provide religious or moral instruction – 83 percent A dissatisfaction with academic instruction at other schools – 73 percent Nontraditional approach to children's education – or "unschoolers" who consider typical curriculums and standardized testing as counterproductive to quality education – 65 percent Other reasons, such as family time, finances, travel and distance – 32 percent Child has special needs (other than physical or mental health problems) that schools cannot or will not meet – 21 percent Child has a physical or mental health problem – 11 percent Parents who report that they homeschool to provide religious or moral instruction increased from 72 percent to 83 percent from 2003 to 2007. Above all other responses, parents cited providing religious and moral instruction as the most important factor in the decision to teach their children at home (36 percent). The second most important issue was concern about the school environment (21 percent), while the third reason was dissatisfaction with academic instruction at other schools (17 percent). Research has shown the positive effects of homeschooling through the years. While some critics say teaching children at home may stunt their social growth, studies indicate homeschooled students fare well or better than public and private school students in terms of social, emotional and psychological development. Additionally, homeschoolers earn higher marks than peers who attend public schools. Academic Leadership, an online journal, cites findings from at least three nationwide studies across the United States and two nationwide studies in Canada. "The home educated in grades K to 12 have scored, on average, at the 65th to 80th percentile on standardized academic achievement tests in the United States and Canada, compared to the public school average of the 50th percentile," it states. Three studies also show that demographics, income and education level of homeschooling parents are generally irrelevant with regard to quality of education in a home setting. On average, homeschoolers in low-income families with less formal education still score higher than state-school averages.
I keep seeing stories about homeschooled college football star and Heisman Trophy winner Tim Tebow.  The prospect of competing in high school sports, scouting, and having a professional sports career are not concerns for our family.  But, sports are a consideration for many families considering homeschooling, especially as families consider homeschooling high school. In some states, homeschoolers are able to play on local public school teams.  In other states certain homeschoolers are fighting to change laws to allow homeschoolers to play.  The public school bureaucrats, of course, don't want private homeschoolers playing on their teams.  My personal opinion is that I don't want anything the government schools have to offer.  With "free" goodies comes control and government control of my home school would be an anathema.  The good news is that the options for private sports training are many and varied.  Private and amateur leagues abound in most metro areas. For example, the Oklahoma Christian Home Educated Football Association is a nonprofit Christian athletic organization established to serve homeschool families in Oklahoma City and the surrounding areas.  Although the public schools may have larger programs for traditional team sports, we live in a new world order of sporting.  Baseball and American football are not Olympic sports.  (Baseball and softball was voted off the 2012 Summer Olympic Games in London.)  The internet provides a medium for acquiring the best training information regardless of your locale.  So, if it’s the training, discipline, team experience, or personal confidence that you are hoping sports will help provide your children, homeschooling is still the best option... if your children love the Lord, sports is just another avenue where these positive character traits can be a good witness. Let's pray that Tim Tebow can continue to be a good witness for the Lord and homeschoolers.  Here is some Tim Tebow biography from Wikipedia: Timothy "Tim" Richard Tebow (born August 14, 1987) is an American football quarterback for the Florida Gators. He was the first college football player to both rush and pass for 20 touchdowns in a season and was the first sophomore to win the Heisman Trophy. Tebow played quarterback for Nease High School in Ponte Vedra Beach, Florida, where he became a Division I-A recruit and ranked among the top quarterback prospects in the nation as a senior. After a tight recruiting battle, he chose to attend the University of Florida over the University of Alabama. Tebow, being a dual threat quarterback adept at rushing and passing the football, was used in his freshman season largely as a change of pace to the Gators' more traditional quarterback, Chris Leak. His contribution in the 2006 college football season was as a key reserve who helped the Gators win college football's national championship game for the first time since 1996. As a sophomore in the 2007 season, he became the Gators' starting quarterback and broke the Southeastern Conference records for both rushing touchdowns and total touchdowns accounted for in a single season. In addition to the Heisman Trophy, his performance in 2007 also earned him the Maxwell Award as the nation's top football player, the Davey O'Brien Award as the nation's best quarterback, and the James E. Sullivan Award as the nation's most outstanding amateur athlete in any sport. Tebow was born on August 14, 1987 in the Philippines to Bob and Pam Tebow, who were serving as Christian missionaries at the time. While pregnant Pam suffered a life-threatening infection with a pathogenic amoeba. Because of extremely strong drugs used to bring her out of a coma and to relieve her dysentery, the fetus had experienced a severe placental abruption. Expecting a stillbirth, doctors recommended an abortion to protect her own life. She carried the baby to term, and both mother and child survived. All of the Tebow children were homeschooled by their mother, who worked to instill the family’s deep Christian beliefs along the way. In 1996, legislation was passed in Florida allowing homeschooled students to compete in local high school sporting events. The law specifies that homeschooled students may participate on the team of the local school in the school district in which they live. The Tebows lived in Jacksonville, Florida, and Tim played linebacker and tight end at the local Trinity Christian Academy for one season. Tebow's preferred position was quarterback, but Trinity football team's offense did not rely on passing the football, so he began to explore his options to play for a new high school. He decided to attend Nease High School, which under head coach Craig Howard was known for having a passing offense. With the rest of his family living on a farm in Duval County, Tim and his mother moved into an apartment in nearby St. Johns County, making him eligible to play for the football team at Nease. His performance soon began to turn some heads, and led to a minor controversy over him being a homeschooled student that chose for which school he wanted to play. As a junior at Nease, Tebow’s stock rose as he became a major college football quarterback prospect and was named the state of Florida's Player of the Year. He would repeat as Player of the Year in his senior season. One of his highlights as a high school athlete was finishing a game on a broken leg. During his senior season he led the Nease Panthers to a state title, earned All-State honors, was named Florida's Mr. Football and a Parade All-American. Tebow finished his high school career with 9,810 passing yards, 3,186 rushing yards, 95 passing touchdowns and 62 rushing touchdowns. He played in the U.S. Army All-American Bowl Game in San Antonio, Texas which features the top 78 senior high school football players in the nation and is shown nationally on NBC television. Tebow was considered one of the nation’s top recruits and was the subject of an ESPN “Faces in Sports” documentary. The segment was titled "Tim Tebow: The Chosen One", and focused on Tim’s homeschool controversy and missionary work in the Philippines, as well as his exploits on the field of play and the college recruiting process. Tim Tebow was also featured in Sports Illustrated on the “Faces in the Crowd” page. In 2007 he was named to FHSAA's All-Century Team that listed the Top 33 football players in the state of Florida's 100 year history of high school football. Despite having family ties to the University of Florida, where his parents first met as students, he remained open-minded during the recruiting process and became very close to Alabama coach Mike Shula. After careful consideration he decided to play for Urban Meyer's Florida Gators. One of the reasons he chose Florida was because of Meyer's spread option offense, an offense for which Tebow was deemed a prototypical quarterback. Tebow spent the last three summers before enrolling at the University of Florida in the Philippines, assisting with his father's orphanage and missionary work.
This weekend, I was at in a quandary at the library -- I had reached the 100 book limit on my card again, and this did not reflect the other books we had out on another card. The librarian, with a knowing smile exclaimed, "you must be a homeschooler!" We then got into a conversation about why homeschoolers are noted for reading a lot more than their schooled counterparts (as an aside – I do screen the books I get from the library for inappropriate content. There are still wholesome fiction books and accurate non-fiction to be found in libraries, if you know what you are looking for, and if your library has not been totally taken over by liberals). Why is it that home educated children are known for reading a great deal more than typical children? Looking at our own home, I can see several reasons. First, homeschooled children do not come in after a hard day of traveling to and from school and have to tackle a load of take home assignments. They do their reinforcement work as they learn their subjects and so their nights are not plagued with the burden of homework. And, since a homeschooler’s day is usually shorter in duration than a brick and mortar school day, homeschoolers naturally have more free time to read.  In our home we are building what we call a "generational library" -- stocking our shelves with classic and quality Christian books found at garage sales, on-line, etc. that cannot be found in the secular libraries. The library we have in our home is brimming with all kinds of edifying gems our children love to read again and again. In addition, our church has an expanding family resource room that is brimming with God-centered reading materials. And, we go to the library, on average, twice a week. Most homeschool families I know have unplugged the TV and are not engaged in the entertainment gamer craze. It is no wonder, then, that no one has to force anyone to read in our home -- whenever they get a free moment, our children grab a good book and that they are several grade levels ahead in reading. We are not anti-technology -- far from it -- my husband is a computer programmer, and our children will hopefully reach his level of expertise one day. But, technology can replace book reading in the lives of modern day children. I am convinced there are a multitude of skills such as vocabulary accumulation which are gained by old fashioned book reading that just cannot be obtained elsewhere. Here is an article in this regard that caught my eye today. Note that is states that among the children surveyed "almost a third take a games console to bed rather than a book, while a quarter never read in their own time". I guess we homeschoolers should be happy when we catch that child with the flashlight, trying to read under the covers!
Are your kids on MySpace or Facebook?  Then they may be facing the same dangers that they might in public school.   According to the New York Times and Washington Post, MySpace has deleted 29,000 registered sexual predators from its membership and Facebook is not far behind... and those are just the sexual predators that they found out about! The good news is that there is a full featured, parent driven social networking site on the way just for Christian homeschoolers.  I can't divulge too much right now as the project is still in development, but the principals are interested in finding likeminded Christian homeschoolers as investors and ministry partners for this new online community. If you are interested in becoming an investor or ministry partner in this ground floor opportunity, please email homeschoolspace@gmail.com.
Venessa Mills is fighting a legal battle for the heart and soul of homeschooling in North Carolina. As reported on World Net Daily, on Friday, March 6, Judge Ned W. Mangum stripped her of the right to homeschool, and ordered her three children to enter public school.  Mills was forced to defend her right to homeschool during divorce proceedings brought on by her husband's unfaithfulness. Mr. Mills admitted, under oath, to repeatedly committing adultery. Even with abundant evidence showing the Mills children are well adjusted and well educated, Judge Mangum ruled overwhelmingly against Mrs. Mills on every point. He stated the children would do better in public school despite the fact that they are currently at or beyond their grade level. Evidence showed two children tested several grades ahead. When issuing his verdict Judge Mangum stated his decision was not ideologically or religiously motivated. However, he told Mrs. Mills public school will "challenge the ideas you've taught them." What has emerged is a picture of a clearly liberal judge imposing his beliefs and striking down traditional values. Mangum, a Democrat appointee, disregarded the facts of the case in favor of his own agenda. Such anti-conservative prejudice is increasingly legislated from the bench, and appears to be encouraged by the Democratic Obama administration. Robyn Williams, friend and homeschool mother of four was present at the proceeding. "I have never seen such injustice and such a direct attack against homeschooling," said Williams. "This judge clearly took personal issue with Venessa's stance on education and faith, even though her children are doing great. If her right to homeschool can be taken away so easily, what will this mean for homeschoolers state wide, or even nationally?" On March 24th lawmakers in North Carolina will be reminded of the sheer numbers of homeschoolers in their state. As students and their parents descend on the capitol, organizers of the Capital Fest 2009 field trip will show they have a voice in North Carolina legislation regarding education. Williams is rallying homeschoolers from across the nation to fight back to defend their rights as Americans to educate their children. She feels the judge has been given a free hand to impose his personal opinions and needs to reexamine his decisions. Please subscribe to Robyn's blog and join the fight for protecting everyone's homeschool rights (www.hsinjustice.com). For more information or to schedule an interview contact Adam Cothes at acothes.publicity@gmail.com or call 253-797-6194. The public is being encouraged to take these action steps: 1. Forward this message to every person on your contact list, and all those interested in protecting basic American rights. After the right to educate is gone, property and other basic rights will follow. 2. Read the blog at www.hsinjustice.com 3. Contact three officials to express your outrage at Venessa Mills' right to homeschool being taken away and the prejudicial orders of this judge. Three or four short emails or phone calls could be the difference for these kids, and many more like them. You can reference the case number: #08CVD17753 Judge's Supervisor Judicial Standards Commission P.O. Box 1122 Raleigh, North Carolina 27602 919-831-3630 State Legislators NC Senate--Neal Hunt (R) 919-733-5850 Neal.Hunt@ncleg.net NC House--Ty Harrell (D) 919-733-5602 Ty.Harrell@ncleg.net North Carolina Governor Governor Bev Perdue Office of the Governor 20301 Mail Service Center Raleigh, NC 27699-0301 Phone: (919)733-4240
Posted by: Considering Homeschooling The North Dakota Home School Association (NDHSA) 2009 Home School Convention is March 19-21, 2009 in Jamestown, ND.  Workshops and guest speakers include: Michael P. Farris is Chairman of the Home School Legal Defense Association and Chancellor of Patrick Henry College. George Escobar is the founder of Advent Film Group (AFG) and has over 20 years experience in film, television and interactive media. He has worked for top executives in the industry including Sony CEO, Fox Network and TELE-TV SVP. Prior to AFG, Escobar was VP of Product Development for Discovery, Executive Director for AOL/Time Warner and is former producing Fellow from the American Film Institute Conservatory. He holds seven U.S. patents in technology and user-interface design. Most recently, George co-produced, directed, and scripted COME WHAT MAY in association with Patrick Henry College (PHC). Mike Farris, founder and chancellor of PHC, plays the moot court coach in the movie. COME WHAT MAY was made by and stars homeschooled students. George acknowledges, “When I was in Hollywood I was a marginal Christian. I knew Christ, but I didn’t live for Him. Now, as a more mature Christian, I can clearly see and appreciate why the Lord literally pulled me away from Hollywood. I might have grown to become a successful filmmaker, but I would have been an ineffective ambassador for Christ. The Lord first had to mold and remake me as a homeschool dad of three sons and a devoted husband to my wife, Claire, for 20 years. More importantly, I needed to learn that the Lord comes first in everything I do. That includes my family, church, education, world view, my craft as a filmmaker, the people I work with and the organizations I support.” Theresa Deckert lives in Devils Lake, ND with her husband Jeff. They have been homeschooling in the state of North Dakota for 24 years. Their two oldest children have graduated from their homeschool and are married. Theresa is currently homeschooling a senior and a 2nd grader. She and her husband serve on the board of the North Dakota Homeschool Association. She is also part of the legislative team working toward a better law for our state and the Lake Region Area Homeschoolers. Her passion as a board member and a workshop leader is to represent and help those who are just beginning this amazing journey called homeschooling. Steve Demme and his wife Sandra have been married for over 29 years. They have been blessed with four boys: Isaac, 28; Ethan, 26; Joseph, 23; and Johnny, 21. With God’s help, they have all been home educated. Steve addresses a variety of topics at homeschool conferences to encourage parents in their God-given responsibilities of raising and training their children for His glory. He and Sandra have created the Math•U•See Foundation, a nonprofit corporation to assist and encourage parents and families with cassettes, booklets, and other helpful resources. Steve is the author and founder of Math•U•See. He served in full or part time pastoral ministry for many years after graduating from Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary. www.stevedemme.com Lois Walfrid Johnson believes that an important part of her call as an author is to restore the spiritual dimension to our understanding of history and religious and political freedoms. Her 29 books and 17 updated editions include three historical series and 21 novels: the Adventures of the Northwoods (1906-07, transition years in MN, WI, and upper MI) and Riverboat Adventures (1857, immigrant, steamboat, and Underground Railroad history). In her Viking Quest series (approximate year 1000) Lois shows a world view in which Vikings came to raid and encountered Christianity. When enough of them became Christians the raids stopped, and courageous sailors changed world history. In the fifth novel, The Raider’s Promise, Lois’ characters join Leif Erikson in founding the only authenticated Viking site in North America. For a partial list of awards received see www.loiswalfridjohnson.com and click the “about Lois” tab. Peggy Ployhar serves as the MACHE (Minnesota Association of Christian Home Educators) Special Needs Coordinator with the goal of “Empowering parents to love homeschooling the special needs children God has chosen for their homes.” She says that homeschooling was God’s chosen blessing for their family, an adventure that started almost 6 years ago when her oldest son was diagnosed with Asperger Syndrome. Peggy’s passion to serve God where He calls and motivate others through her speaking and counseling to do the same, has given countless individuals the courage to step out in faith and trust. She believes that being in the will of God is the cornerstone of the Christian walk and therefore her lessons, lectures and retreats all center around bringing individuals back to truth in all life circumstances. Peggy is the former MOPS (Mothers of Preschoolers) Area Coordinator for MN, ND and SD, and she is certified by the American Association of Christian Counselors. Peggy lives in Apple Valley, MN with her husband Doug and their three children, two cats and one dog. Victor Storkel is founder and president of Virtue in Knowledge Publications. He is first a disciple of the Lord Jesus Christ and has committed his life to follow and apply the teaching of the Bible in all areas of life and to follow the example of Jesus Christ under the leading and empowerment of the Holy Spirit. He is also a national speaker and author on the topics of education and critical thinking skill development. He has been a featured speaker at National Home Education Conventions across the country for the last 10 years. He and his wife Gail have 3 children, Crystal, James and Collette. In his spare time he enjoys studying God’s Priceless Word, travel, golf and soccer. www.virtueinknowledge.com Allen Wold is a former farmer from Wheaton, Minnesota. He has been married to his wife Beth for thirty-two years, and together they have three children and one grandchild. He farmed for twenty-seven years before God led him to enroll at Oak Brook College of Law, a Christian college. He graduated in October 2007. Since the school was online, he homeschooled himself in law while continuing to homeschool his two youngest children.
On Saturday, May 2, Exploring Homeschooling will be hosting a Homeschool Information Night featuring a panel of homeschool support group leaders.  The panel will include: Janice Henry is currently a member of the Regional Advisory Board of the statewide organization, Christian Home Educators of California (CHEA). In 1992 she and her husband, Kirk, entered homeschool leadership, in spite of the fact that they had just begun to homeschool themselves.  The initial group of people, who were simply interested in getting information about homeschooling, developed into a CHEA Support Group and Independent Student Program.  With members in Los Angeles, Orange, and surrounding counties, Southern California Christian Academy (SCCA) continues to help families homeschool with joy and excellence. Janice's warm yet thought provoking messages encourage parents to build strong children and youth for the Kingdom of God through private Christian education in the home. Debe Haller, wife to Danny for 35 years, and mother of four home-schooled graduates, has been a respected leader in home education for over twenty years.  With truth and humor she shares Biblical principles and practical applications she has learned by the grace of God in the areas of being a wife, creative ways to get children to cooperate, teaching techniques, and home school organization.  The Haller family own and operate Hope Country Schoolhouse Homeschool Book Store and Hope Christian Academy PSP in Garden Grove. Debe is the author of The Challenge of Raising Cain and Mrs. Mom: Agonized or Organized? Rebecca Kocsis, is a veteran homeschooling mother, Support Network Director for the Christian Home Educators Association of California.  Along with her husband, Ed, she graduated all five of her children from their homeschool and is proud to say that her grandchildren are now being homeschooled, as well.  Rebecca serves as the Director of Olive Tree Christian School, a PSP serving Riverside County and much of the surrounding Southland. Terri Bonstrom and husband Greg recently celebrated their 20th wedding anniversary. They have one son, Jimmy, who will be 16 in May of this year.  Jimmy has been homeschooled since birth.  Greg and Terri currently lead a support group for families, South Orange County Christian hOmeschoolers (SOCCO), which offers a private website for members to share their homeschool trials and triumphs, and to volunteer their God-given resources with each other to support one another in their homeschool journey. For more information on SOCCO, please visit the public website: www.socco-online.com Toni Muus and her husband Jerry have been married for 33 years and have homeschooled their three children since 1988.  Their youngest son will be graduating in 2010.  Along with homeschooling Toni has been in some form of leadership with Whittier Christian Schools PSP and has been its Director since 1999. Posted by Considering Homeschooling.
Classic considering homeschooling...  from Homeschool Family: Will your children believe in Jesus when they graduate from high school? Homeschooled: 94% Public Schooled: 15% 94% of homeschoolers keep the faith and 93% continue to attend church after the high school years. But a shocking 75% to 85% of Christian children sent to public school drop out of church, and do not hold a Christian worldview after high school graduation. There has never been a better time to homeschool... Never before have parents had access to such a wealth of educational resources and technology for home education. And, Christian homeschool support groups abound, offering parents a helping hand in homeschooling. There is an abundance of extra-curricula activities for homeschoolers to participate in, with opportunities for wholesome friendships and real-life learning experiences. Homeschoolers avoid harmful school environments where God is mocked, where destructive peer influence is the norm, where drugs, alcohol, promiscuity and homosexuality are promoted, and where school violence is on the rise. By grade eight, the average homeschooled student performs four grade levels above their public and private school counterparts. A background in teaching is not necessary; in fact, "home educated students' test scores remained between the 80th and 90th percentiles, whether their mothers had a college degree or did not complete high school." How to get started homeschooling... It is natural to feel uncertain when you begin. Pray and trust God for the confidence you need. Get the support of other believers by contacting the homeschool organization listed on the back of this brochure. Research homeschooling by attending Christian homeschool conventions and reading books like Home Schooling: The Right Choice by Christopher Klicka. Keep your young ones home and out of preschool which disrupts family bonding, teaches inconsistent discipline, and exposes children to harmful peer behavior. Avoid government homeschooling programs such as "charter schools" and public school independent study programs. These government programs usurp the father’s God-given headship over the family and focus the homeschool on humanist goals and curriculum. Discover the blessings of private Christian homeschooling – your children will appreciate your caring efforts. In fact, a recent study found that 95% of the homeschool graduates surveyed were glad that they were homeschooled. What does God say about education? Homeschooling is the most Biblical form of education. God addresses parents, not government employees, as the educators of their own children: "And these words which I command you today shall be in your heart. You shall teach them diligently to your children, and shall talk of them when you sit in your house, when you walk by the way, when you lie down, and when you rise up." - Deuteronomy 6:6-7 "All your children shall be taught by the Lord, and great shall be the peace of your children." - Isaiah 54:13 "Train up a child in the way he should go, and when he is old he will not depart from it." - Proverbs 22:6 Jesus said: "Can a blind man lead a blind man? Will they not both fall into a pit? A student is not above his teacher, but everyone who is fully trained will be like his teacher." - Luke 6:39, 40 "Learn not the way of the heathen." - Jeremiah 10:2 "He who walks with the wise grows wise, but a companion of fools suffers harm." - Proverbs 13:20
Classic considering homeschooling...  from Considering Homeschooling: Will your children believe in Jesus when they graduate from high school? Homeschooled: 94% Public Schooled: 15% 94% of homeschoolers keep the faith and 93% continue to attend church after the high school years. But a shocking 75% to 85% of Christian children sent to public school drop out of church, and do not hold a Christian worldview after high school graduation. There has never been a better time to homeschool... Never before have parents had access to such a wealth of educational resources and technology for home education. And, Christian homeschool support groups abound, offering parents a helping hand in homeschooling. There is an abundance of extra-curricula activities for homeschoolers to participate in, with opportunities for wholesome friendships and real-life learning experiences. Homeschoolers avoid harmful school environments where God is mocked, where destructive peer influence is the norm, where drugs, alcohol, promiscuity and homosexuality are promoted, and where school violence is on the rise. By grade eight, the average homeschooled student performs four grade levels above their public and private school counterparts. A background in teaching is not necessary; in fact, "home educated students' test scores remained between the 80th and 90th percentiles, whether their mothers had a college degree or did not complete high school." How to get started homeschooling... It is natural to feel uncertain when you begin. Pray and trust God for the confidence you need. Get the support of other believers by contacting the homeschool organization listed on the back of this brochure. Research homeschooling by attending Christian homeschool conventions and reading books like Home Schooling: The Right Choice by Christopher Klicka. Keep your young ones home and out of preschool which disrupts family bonding, teaches inconsistent discipline, and exposes children to harmful peer behavior. Avoid government homeschooling programs such as "charter schools" and public school independent study programs. These government programs usurp the father’s God-given headship over the family and focus the homeschool on humanist goals and curriculum. Discover the blessings of private Christian homeschooling – your children will appreciate your caring efforts. In fact, a recent study found that 95% of the homeschool graduates surveyed were glad that they were homeschooled. What does God say about education? Homeschooling is the most Biblical form of education. God addresses parents, not government employees, as the educators of their own children: "And these words which I command you today shall be in your heart. You shall teach them diligently to your children, and shall talk of them when you sit in your house, when you walk by the way, when you lie down, and when you rise up." - Deuteronomy 6:6-7 "All your children shall be taught by the Lord, and great shall be the peace of your children." - Isaiah 54:13 "Train up a child in the way he should go, and when he is old he will not depart from it." - Proverbs 22:6 Jesus said: "Can a blind man lead a blind man? Will they not both fall into a pit? A student is not above his teacher, but everyone who is fully trained will be like his teacher." - Luke 6:39, 40 "Learn not the way of the heathen." - Jeremiah 10:2 "He who walks with the wise grows wise, but a companion of fools suffers harm." - Proverbs 13:20
Many homeschoolers have expressed unusual weariness at the end of this year, feeling like we've run into the proverbial brick wall.