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Business majors have several core requirements and for most this is one of them. This 3 credit exam is fairly broad as it covers marketing, management, stocks, insurance and types of businesses. It is better to tackle this fact based exam after you have built a vocabulary in the above topics. On the exam you will find all the technical business lingo and a few simple scenarios. That being said, make sure you study for the updated refreshed version and not the one retired in August of 2009. Here are the materials we used to study for the older version, our method and a list of must knows for the exam. The best materials for this exam come from knowledge of marketing, management and business. We used the following:DSST Fact SheetStandard Deviants: Marketing(not the most wholesome material with some adult humor that was unnecessary)InstantCert (A++ for this exam)Our method was based on timing and crossover. My students took and passed CLEP Management and DSST Supervision prior to beginning this topic. Both said those exams prepared them for Business, possibly with no additional study. We took one week to prep for this test since it was being updated and our materials were for the older version. They also studied the Business cards on InstantCert until they were quite familiar with them. Here is what you must know for the older version:TQMMediation and ArbitrationNAFTATypes of BusinessesTypes of CorporationsFunctions of ManagersFranchise SystemForeign TradeTax PolicyTypes of Stocks & BondsInsurance, premiums, deductionComputing and Computer terminologyMarketing, demographic, geographicHere is a link to the new version. Make sure to compare the fact sheets and note the differences. I'll update this post if I hear of better materials for the new version.
It certainly is nice to have an easy time now and then. But if you are going for a college degree should you really expect any of it to be easy? What are the secrets to passing an exam? There are at least three:1. Good Study HabitsThese include:?- Focused study time. Limit distractions and set a time for study. You may need to turn of the iPod or Facebook to get yourself into the zone for study.?- Having clear goals. It can really help if you map out where you want to be in a year. Students achieve more with a good game plan. ?- Adequate rest. ?- Eating well. Watch the sugar and caffeine. Fuel your body for study. 2. Familiarity with the SubjectThis comes from:?- Interest. Find a topic that interests you. With so many CLEP and DSST exams you surely can find one that peaks your interest.?- Crossover. One of our biggest factors for success is finding exams that build on one another. So, Art follows Humanities, Government is followed by US History and English Lit comes after Analyzing Lit. The students on the InstantCert forum are expert on which exams to take in what order. 3. The Best ToolsDo your homework here. Find out:?- Which textbooks and sources other used sucessfully.?- Which textbooks and materials match the specifics of your exam. Don't spend time on Teddy Roosevelt for the US History 1 exam and make sure your course?description is of the most recent version of the test.A little work and effort makes testing much easier.Happy studying!!
So, how do CLEP exams stack up as to difficulty? It is hard to say with precision because College Board and Dantes do not publish their overall pass rates, but the military posts their pass rates online. Military testers can take CLEP or DSST (Dantes) exams for free which could influence their choice to take an exam “cold” or without a lot of preparation. That being said, here are the military pass rates, arranged easiest to most difficult.2008 Pass Rate for Computer-Based Military TestingCLEP/DSST Exam – Pass RateDSST Technical Writing – 94%CLEP Spanish Language – 88%DSST Introduction to Computing – 83% (or 53%)*DSST Introduction to Business – 81%DSST Ethics in America – 82% (or 30%)*CLEP Analyzing and Interpreting Literature – 71%DSST Here’s to Your Health – 70% (or 41%)*DSST Principles of Supervision – 69%CLEP Principles of Management – 67%DSST Business Mathematics – 66%DSST Human Resource Management – 65%CLEP Principles of Marketing – 64%CLEP German Language – 64%CLEP Freshman College Composition – 64%CLEP French Language – 63%DSST Introduction to Law Enforcement – 62%DSST Personal Finance – 61% (or 31%)*DSST Environment and Humanity – 60%DSST Management Information Systems – 58% (or 33%)*DSST Foundations of Education – 56%CLEP Western Civilization 1 – 55%DSST Fundamentals of Counseling – 55%DSST Organizational Behavior – 53%DSST Introduction to World Religions – 53% (or 30%)*DSST Astronomy – 52%DSST Principles of Physical Science 1 – 52%DSST Introduction to Modern Middle East – 49%DSST Business Law 2 – 48%CLEP Social Sciences and History – 47%CLEP Introductory Sociology – 45%CLEP Western Civilization 2 – 44%CLEP Introductory Psychology – 42%DSST Lifespan Developmental Psychology – 42%DSST Human Cultural Geography – 40%CLEP College Mathematics – 40%DSST Criminal Justice – 40% (or 35%)*CLEP Natural Sciences – 40%CLEP Information Systems and Computer Applications – 40%CLEP English Composition with Essay – 39%CLEP Humanities – 37%DSST Rise and Fall of the Soviet Union – 37%DSST Substance Abuse – 37% (or 39%)*DSST Civil War and Reconstruction – 35%DSST Western Europe since 1945 – 35%DSST Art of the Western World – 34%CLEP English Literature – 33%DSST General Anthropology – 33%CLEP History of the United States 2 – 32%CLEP History of the United States 1 – 31%CLEP Biology – 31%CLEP English Composition – 31%CLEP Introduction into Educational Psychology – 29%CLEP Precal – 28%DSST A History of the Vietnam War – 27%CLEP American Government – 24%DSST Principles of Statistics – 24% (or 49%)*DSST Fundamentals of College Algebra – 23% (or 12%)*CLEP Principles of Macroeconomics – 22%DSST Principles of Financial Accounting – 22%CLEP Human Growth and Development – 22%CLEP Introductory Business Law – 21%CLEP Principles of Microeconomics – 20%CLEP American Literature – 18%CLEP College Algebra – 17%CLEP Calculus – 17%DSST Money and Banking – 16%DSST Principles of Finance – 11%CLEP Financial Accounting – 7%CLEP Chemistry – 4%DSST Physical Geology – 2%Bear in mind a few details. These pass rates are for 2008 military on base computer versions of these exams. Some have been modified since these results were compiled. The best way to make an exam easy is to work hard, use the best materials available and study for exams that interest you. And a sure fire edge is being a member of InstantCert.More later on what makes an exam easy.*New updated DSST exams
What if there was a way to jump start your student’s college degree, even during the high school years? What if a college degree could be earned along side your high school courses? CLEP and DSST exams provide exactly that opportunity. College credit is available to the high school student. There are many advantages to pursuing CLEP courses during high school. Many course are available that contain material your high school student already knows, thereby reducing the time on campus, lightening the college work load, reducing the cost of tuition, and saving time that can be used for work and ministry. Many students can finish High School with their college core degree requirements completed. Some students can even finish an associates or bachelors degree during their high school years. Starting on the journey of CLEP for High School can be intimidating. Here is a step by step plan:1. Pray. Make sure this is the path the Lord has for you. 2. Make sure your spouse is on board with a different approach to High School. 3. Check your state homeschooling laws. Many states have mandated curriculum while others provide more flexibility. Keep your state regulations in mind as you plan. 4. Acquire a government issued photo ID for your student. Don’t wait on this one as some federal regulations have increased the wait time for such identification. This, along with a Social Security number, is required to take a CLEP or DSST exam. 5. Consider going for a complete degree using credit by examination. Visit TESC's website and let your kids dream about possible degrees, starting with Associates degrees. This dreaming can give you insight into where the Lord may be leading your student.6. If your student has a particular college in mind, contact them and ask how many CLEP courses they accept, which ones and what score they require. Colleges differ as to which CLEP courses they accept and how many.7. Get copies of CLEP Official Study Guide 2010 and Cracking the CLEP, 5th Edition (College Test Preparation). There is nothing like having practice tests in your hands. These books have one of each of the possible CLEP exams and will be used later for practice tests.8. Determine interest. What areas interest your student? CLEP courses are available in 34 subject areas. Scan thru the possible CLEP courses on this site for courses your kids may be ready for already (or could be in a few weeks) or courses that interest them. 9. Consider putting aside ideas about covering multiple subjects at once. We go faster with only one or two courses at a time.10. Use the TESC website degree descriptions to build a template for the possible degree your student is interested it. Remember that you can customize your degree but you don't have to have the full plan to get started.11. Choose a course, or two. Confirm that the textbook or class your student is taking matches the CLEP exam content. Always refer to the exam description found at College Board.12. Search for a testing center near you. They can be found using the search at College Board. Try the nearby university or community college.Study. Take practice tests. Review. Make appointment. Take CLEP test.Post any questions. We’re here to help.
Who should go for this exam? Those seeking a degree in the Arts or History, fans of classic literature, Janeites, or students who have been successful with CLEP Humanities or CLEP Analyzing Literature. This 6 credit examination is similar in content to a two semester college English course, covering Beowulf to the present and analysis of literary passages. It comes with an optional essay so check with your college to see if the essay is required. My student is going for a degree from TESC and we have been told the essay is not necessary. Here you will find our favorite materials, the method of study we utilized and what you must know to pass. There are many materials available for Literature students but not as many that are specific to this CLEP exam so we went to homeschool sources, Amazon and the library. We found: Introduction to English Literature : English Literature I (Classics for Christians, Volume 5) (A+ text) Spark Notes Literature Guides (free online, including quizzes) InstantCert (IC provides no flashcards for this exam but they have priceless feedback on the forum) English Literature (Barron's Ez-101 Study Keys) (for reference) Barron's AP English Literature and Composition (Barron's How to Prepare for the Ap English Literature and Composition Advanced Placement Examination) (for some of the best practice in analysis of passages) CLEP Official Study Guide 2010 (for the final exam)Movies from the Library:Hamlet - Mel Gibson versionKing Lear All Jane Austin films Jane Eyre Wuthering Heights Any DickensThe method of study for this test was led by my student. She was already an avid reader, especially of Jane Austin's so she had a lot to build on. She used Introduction to English Literature : English Literature I (Classics for Christians, Volume 5) as a framework, reading books, watching films and reading Spark Notes outlines to fill in gaps in her knowledge. The CLEP Humanities exam had prepared her somewhat and she continued to add information on authors, genres and works. I gathered feedback from the InstantCert forum and we quizzed daily. She used the Barron's book for reference in the final days and took the CLEP Official Study Guide 2010 exam to gauge readiness. After her previous success on the Analyzing Literature exam all she did to prepare for the analysis portion was to practice this skill with Barron's AP English Literature and Composition (Barron's How to Prepare for the Ap English Literature and Composition Advanced Placement Examination). The result was a good score and another 6 credits toward her degree.What you must be familiar with:Literary TermsBeowulfBronte SistersCanterbury TalesCavalier PoetsCharles LambChristina RossettiDaniel DefoeDickensE.M. ForsterGerard Manley HopkinsHamletJane AustenJohn Stuart MillJonathan SwiftKatherine MansfieldKing ArthurMacbethOthelloParadise LostPilgrim’s ProgressRomeo and JulietRudyard KiplingTale of Ancient MarinerThomas HardyVirginia WolfWilliam BlakeA complete exam description can be found here.Have fun. Rent a movie. Read a poem and dig in. Work hard and you may find yourself 6 credits richer.
This exam makes a nice end to a 9 credit trilogy of American Government, US History 1 & US History 2. With lots of crossover a high school or college student can earn those 9 credits as each exam builds on the others. US History 2 covers material from the end of the Civil War to Reagan with a few mentions of material of Bush 1 & 2. Here is the material we liked and used, the method that worked for us and what you must know to do well.As with any US History exam there are so many materials available but these rose to the top:CLEP History of the United States II w/CD (REA) - The Best Test Prep for the CLE (Test Preps) (A+ material, very helpful)American History, 1877 to the Present (Barron's EZ-101 Study Keys)American History (Minipedia) The History Channel Presents The Presidents (the same ones we recommend for US History 1)CLEP Official Study Guide 2010 (for the final practice test)My eldest is the one who tackled this exam. Her method began with a practice test, just to see where she was with the material. Then she read the REA text, taking notes. Now to another practice test to see how prepared she was. Here she used the Barron's and Minipedia books to fill in holes in her knowledge. Finally, she took practice tests and filled in holes until she had mastered the material. During the entire study time she watched the Presidents DVD, at least 3 or 4 times, to solidify the timeline in her mind. Here is what you must know:Cross over material from American Government (civil rights legislation, civil liberties, Supreme Court cases of the period)Civil War ActsWomen's Rights MovementSuffrageCivil rights and Race RelationsPolitical StructuresTimeline of the Presidents (especially noting their scandals & troubles)Political Scandals (like Watergate and the Grant Administration corruption)Roosevelts (both FDR & Theodore)NOT WW1 & WW2 (this is not a foreign policy test as much as you might expect)Footnotes of US History, like US History 1 A detailed exam description can be found here.This test was her third Social Sciences exam and was a nice capstone for her study of America. She recommends taking all three of these American CLEP exams for a high school student, studying your regular High School text if you like, and then spending a few weeks on the REA book. The next could be the Civil War DSST exam for a more advanced student. Bottom line best resource:CLEP History of the United States II w/CD (REA) - The Best Test Prep for the CLE (Test Preps)
This 3 credit, upper level history exam is exactly what it claims to be, upper level and specific to the Civil war and Reconstruction. If your college requires a certain number of upper level exams, you are a student of the Civil War already or if you are an advanced student 17 or older this is an enjoyable study of a difficult period in US History. The materials are plentiful and interesting, the study guide is wonderfully accurate and what you learn will stay with you. Get ready for a powerful topic.Finding materials for this test is not difficult as the library and bookstore shelves are full of biographies and literature from or about this period. Here are the materials we found most helpful or enjoyable: The Civil War - A Film by Ken Burns The Complete Idiot's Guide to the Civil War, 2nd Edition (a good read) Sparks Notes Civil War and Sparks Notes Reconstruction (Small, concise, inexpensive and including short tests in the back) InstantCert Wikipedia - The American Civil War (we used Wikipedia more for this exam than any so far) The Dantes Official Fact Sheet (more on this great source later) Civil War Flash Cards Gettysburg (Widescreen Edition) (optional, but so helpful to put the pieces of this battle together) Gods & Generals (optional but wonderful, Lee and Jackson are must knows as are their impacts) Our method for this exam was new. As we had few official practice tests to gauge readiness we created a question sheet from the InstantCert forum feedback and started researching. Daily we searched for answers to questions from causes of the war to reconstruction policies. The students watched the Ken Burns Videos 2-5 times to get the most out of the visuals. Daily they used the InstantCert flashcards and did assignments from me based on the DSST Fact sheet. If a student knows the what, who, where and why of the DSST fact sheet they should be able to do well on this one. I broke the sections into 6 or so assignments with them filling in the outline percentage sections with research and answers. We spent evenings with Gettysburg and Gods and Generals DVDs.What you must know:Andersonville Battles, major and secondary (outcomes, stats, first, last, bloodiest, political and tactical impacts, Generals of each side) Government structure on each side, weakness of each Lifestyles of each side (women, poor, slaves, soldiers, POWs) Foreign affairs Slavery (conditions, abolitionists, emancipation) Literature of the time (Uncle Tom's Cabin and more)Weapons and their impacts Political Parties Reconstruction plans and failures Dred Scott decision, impact and implication A detailed exam description can be found here.My students recommend this test for an older student as it is very deep and detailed. Not many years are covered so each takes on more importance. This one is a challenge but my students were able to concentrate on this one subject (day and night some days) and do quite well. The 4 option multiple choice of a DSST exam is another blessing. If you choose this one we are sure you will discover much about a difficult time in our nation's history.
This course will set you apart from the workforce, give you an edge. It will teach you how and give you the credentials to boss others around. Develop your organizational skills. Prepare yourself for management positions. DSST Principles of Supervision is a course for you.The DSST Principles of Supervision exam is a 3 credit Business exam that covers material taught in a college level introductory course in management and organizations. It includes the roles of a supervisor, management functions and organizational environment. A complete course description can be found here. This was our second business exam and we recommend taking it after CLEP Principles of Management. Here are the materials we used, our study method and what you must know to pass. Materials abound for this exam but the good news is that most of them are low cost and there is so much cross over from CLEP Management that you are most of the way there.Here is what we used: Peterson's online exams DSST Principles of Supervision (DANTES series) (Dantes Subject Standardized Tests (Dantes)) InstantCert (both the cards and the forum feedback)Our method for this exam was quick and intense. We studied the Peterson's tests, using the wrong answer study method from another post, paying special attention to the explanations of each question. One of my students said, "Test yourself silly". Study and memorize the feedback from the InstantCert forum. Take the official practice test and when you are scoring in the 60's you should be good to go. This test was updated this summer and we took the new version. Pay special attention to the details. Another student said, "They hound you on the details".You must know the core material from CLEP Management. Focus on:Leadership StylesSupervisor's RolesTheories of Supervision in practiceMake sure you can match theory to theorist, theorist to name, theory to its definition, definition to theory, theory to real lifeInternational and Domestic TradeInternational and Domestic EconomicsEmbargosTariffsBusiness LawUnionsLots of employee hiring proceduresHuman Resource ManagementHave fun with this one. Some of the questions were unfamiliar, but with logic and a little background in Team Policy debate or in the business world you may do well.
Are you pursuing a business degree? Do you see yourself as an entrepreneur? Do you need to set yourself apart from other entry-level employees at work? If you said yes to any of these, maybe CLEP Principles of Management is a course for you.The CLEP Principles of Management exam is a 3 credit Business exam that covers material taught in a college level introductory course in management and organizations. It includes operational and functional aspects of business and human resources. This was our first business exam and it proved to be a good place to start. Here are the materials we used, our study method and what you must know to pass.Many materials are available for this course but the good news for the cost conscious collegiate is our favorites were almost all free or low cost. We purchased the REA Principles of Management Guide with the CD-ROM practice tests but found other materials we preferred. We used:Principles of Management (Cliffs Quick Review) Peterson's Online Practice examsInstantCert ($20 a month) plus the feedback on the InstantCert forum (priceless)CLEP Official Study Guide 2009 A good study method always works in phases and this course was no exception. First we read through the Cliff's Notes Management text, made flash cards and took notes from it and the InstantCert forum and studied the InstantCert material. Next we began the practice test phase, beginning with the Peterson's tests (see the post on studying wrong answers for more details on this process) and ending with the CLEP Official test for a final exam. As soon as both students were scoring in the 60's or 70's on their practice tests we made the appointment with our local testing center. We are pleased to report that they both passed but not with the scores they would have liked. Here is their advice:Peterson's test were by far the most helpful of all the materials. We were glad to have taken them each twice, at least.CLEP Official was good but it was not a true indication of what would be on the test.Be ready for 20 or more names of management theorists and their theories, some we had not encountered in our practice materials.InstantCert was great.Find another source, like Wikipedia or another textbook for more of the theorists.Take notes at the testing facility during your test (they provide paper for this). Sometimes this helps with eliminating incorrect answers.Make sure you know and understand:1. Types of Power (reward, legitimate, coercive, expert and referent)2. Authority (functional, line, staff)3. Types of management structure (formal, functional, mechanistic, network, organic, team)4. Types of teams (functional, cross-functional, self-directed)A complete exam description can be found at College Board.Sometimes the best part of an exam is when you are finished, and while this is partly true we learned so much about the evolution of management here in the United States, how we manage our homes, how the church is managed, how employees respond to different types of managers and how unions affect business. Having spent time in a large hospital we have new insight into how the staff was organized. I pray that the Lord uses this insight for His glory in the lives of my children.
College at Home? Sounds like a scam or too good to be true. Neither is the case. You can receive nationally recognized college level credit for a fraction of the cost, at your own pace and mostly from the comfort of your home. There are several reasons to consider this option. Three of them are cost, time and flexibility.Pursing college credit or a complete degree using the Credit by Examination method can be a huge money saver. Studying at home eliminates the cost of room, board and commuting to a college campus as it is only necessary to go on a campus for the final exam. Also, many of the materials used are low or no cost. Each 3-6 credit exam can be completed, including the final test, for around $125.This method also saves time. In the case of an adult learner this type of credit can be earned while working, raising children or pursuing ministry. Depending on the student, study time, skill, age and schedule some of these exams can be passed in as little as two weeks, although we usually are ready to pass one a month. Students still in high school may use this as a kind of dual credit by studying their regular high school materials and then spending a few weeks with the CLEP or DSST specific materials, taking practice tests and sitting for the exam. How amazing to earn college credit during high school and at a fraction of the cost. It is like getting a scholarship before you even are ready to apply to a college.One of the best reasons to use the CBE (Credit by Examination) method is flexibility. A student can study subjects of interest, in the order of their choice and on their time schedule. They can transfer these credits to many accredited colleges and universities. They can also live at home, stay connected with family and their local support system, work, raise a family, the options are endless. If the student is interested in a complete degree from home there are at least three regionally accredited colleges that are making this option a reality.Are you interested? Does this sound like something you or your student would like to pursue? Post a comment. Read about the exams we have passed and pray. This may be just what you need.
Years ago my family met a young man who was ready to graduate High School and College simultaneously at the impressive age of 17 for about $5,000. What has followed has been an interesting and challenging journey into the world of "out of the box", Credit by Examination collegiate homeschooling.The beginning was bumpy, as we had no experience and had not discovered many of the invaluable resources we utilize today. My students studied for months for the first test, CLEP American Government, and passed with fair scores, although we wasted time studying some less than ideal materials. God showed favor on our efforts and the kids have been richer for what they learned from that course.The next year we hit a bit of a bump in the road as my husband spent several months in the hospital. As he began to rehab close to home we got back in the CLEP game and began to study for the Humanities exam. This was followed by literature courses and a few more history/social science courses. During this time we found some of the resources we use all the time, like InstantCert and REA study guides with the CD-ROM that simulates the actual testing experience. My dd, having graduated from her homeschool high school studies, moved at a faster pace than my ds#1 who was still in high school and competing in Lincoln Douglas debate.These days, now that both are graduated and we are finished with debate, we are really focused on getting their degrees ASAP. Dd is going for a Communications Bachelor and ds#1 is pursuing an Associates in Business, followed by a communications degree, Lord willing.This road is a bit off the beaten path but it is a good road, full of adventure, creativity, flexibility and family time. More on the "why" of college at home later......
The CLEP American Government test is a 3 credit exam Social Sciences and History exam. This was our first CLEP exam and it makes a great starting point for students who love history, are interested in government and politics or are competing in debate.Here is a list of materials we used, our method of study and what you must know to pass.....Materials available for this exam can be pretty overwhelming. I used any text available at the library covering CLEP American Government or AP US Government and Politics, includingKaplan AP U.S. Government & Politics 2009 (Kaplan Ap Us Government and Politics) Barron's AP U.S. Government and Politics CLEP Official Study Guide 2010 American Government (Cliffs Quick Review) Peterson's online practice examsBy far my favorite was the Cliffs guide. You can access it free here.Be sure to study the glossary (we memorized it) and take good notes. The other sources were used for test practice and "out loud" question. Other materials may be just as good. We would have used InstanCert but we had not discovered it yet.REA just released their CLEP American Government w/CD-ROM (REA) (Best Test Preparation for the CLEP). Consider using it as your main textbook and supplementing with the Cliffs Guide.Prior to this exam we had little experience in dealing with multiple choice questions at the college level. Together we learned to reason through choices and narrow down to the best answer. Daily I read aloud from the Cliffs guide while they took notes. We spent a lot of time chasing rabbits and creating analogies to help reinforce difficult concepts. This was followed by lots of drill with flashcards made from the Cliffs glossary. The last phase of study was practice tests and as soon as they were scoring in the 60's (according to the CLEP scoring method) we made the appointment for the exam. Other methods may be just as good but this served us pretty well.In order to pass this exam you must know the following concepts well:The Constitution, ammendments and articles Articles of Confederation Major supreme court cases Civil rights acts and their impacts Civil Liberties Types of Federalism The job of the Senate, President, VP, ect Congressional Procedures and committees (differences between committees) A more extensive list of topics covered and percentages is covered at College Board.I highly recommend this CLEP for any student in NCFCA Team Policy debate, both for the knowledge gained but also because policy debate prepares the student for parts of this exam. Your student will learn so much about the government and be able to apply this to negative and affirmative argumentation. For those not in debate this still makes a good starting point as it can be a good foundation for the US History 1 & 2 exams.
The CLEP US History 1 exam is a 3 credit Social Sciences and History exam that covers the early colonial period of North America though Reconstruction. This was our second CLEP test and overlaps material from CLEP American Government, especially the Constitution, Bill of Rights and Supreme Court cases. Students interested in history should be able to enjoy this exam and do well. Here are the materials we used, our study method and what you must know to pass.Available materials for this exam abound and many are good but our favorites were:InstantCert (invaluable for this exam, especially the feedback section of the forum) The CLEP History of the United States I w/CD (REA) - The Best Test Prep for the CLEP Official Study Guide 2010 (makes a great final exam) Peterson's online practice exams (harder than the actual exam but excellent for study)The History Channel Presents The Presidents For this exam we used a combination of texts, videos, flashcards and a few movies from the period. Making flashcards or a power point presentation of the presidents, the highlights of each administration, and the major supreme court cases were helpful to solidify the timeline and flow of the study. Reading through the text of the REA book, while taking notes was important for the first phase of study. Next we began practice testing, starting with REA's CD-ROM tests and moving to Peterson's online tests and finally ending with the CLEP Official exam. The practice testing phase showed us what we needed to study more and Wikipedia is a good source for this because it was so easy to search for the term or person we were unfamiliar with.The major "must knows" for this exam are:Women's issues of the period Reform Movements (both religious and political) Literature of the period Differences betwen the different British colonies Presidents, their administations (along with their scandals) The Constitution, Bill of Rights, Articles of Confederation Slavery and Indentured Servitude A more detailed exam description can be found here.A suprising component about this exam was the time spent on more minor players and issues and less on major figures like Washington. If you need any more Social Science credits and don't mind a challenge think about following this exam with DSST Civil War and Reconstruction. More on that one later...
When you have spent time studying for a CLEP or DSST exam the next step is to gather some practice tests and practice. It is a good idea to find 3-7 practice tests for your subject, if possible. But what is the best method for taking these tests and getting the most out of the process? Here is a detailed description of our method. 1. EvaluateTake a practice test, timed if possible. This lets you know how much you have retained from your study time or previous experience.2. Track incorrectMake a note of all your incorrect answers and those that were right only because of a total guess3. List true statementsMake a list of true statements from the answer explanations. These true statements are either the answer you guessed and its definition, or the question with the real answer, or both. This step really shows you the weak places in your studying.4. SortOrganize these true statements intoa. A list of definitions that don't fall into a categoryb. Big issue charts or sheets. Use one blank sheet of paper for each of these issues (for example, The Constitution or Southern Civil War losses with causes). IEW's Advanced note taking System works well for these charts.5. StorePlace these notes in a 3 ring binder and review them, focusing on weak areas and adding further research (like Google searching or Wikipedia)6. Test againRetake test or take another one7. Repeat until masteredRepeat steps 2-6 until you are scoring in the mid 60's consistently (though we prefer 70's)8. Real TestMake appointment and sit for test (unless your testing facility requires more than a few day's notice)9. Celebrate (hopefully)