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Library of Congress: News for Teachers

Library of Congress: News for Teachers

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Looking for resources for Constitution Day activities? The Library of Congress has a variety of sources you can use. Explore the Creating the United States online exhibit and learn more about the impact of the Constitution, Bill of Rights and Declaration of Independence on U.S. history. Explore the interactive Constitution where students can learn more about the Constitution and origin of important parts of the Constitution. The Learn More will lead you to links for other exhibits, online resources, webcasts and lessons you can use to help students learn more about the Constitution.
Interested in learning strategies to teach about the Declaration of Independence, the Constitution and the Bill of Rights using Library of Congress primary sources? Register to attend the Library of Congress Creating the US Teacher Institute. Participants will leave with strategies and materials they can use in their schools. The institute uses the Library's exhibition Creating the United States as its foundation. Learn how to make this era in our country’s history “come alive” for student using images, manuscripts, letters, photographs, maps, and poetry.
HISTORY(tm), together with the Veterans History Project of the Library of Congress, will host a National Teach-In on Veterans History on Wednesday, October 21st, 2009 at 12pm EST. Educators and students nationwide can tune-in and view this LIVE webcast online at www.veterans.com. The webcast will be broadcast live from the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C. A panel of educators and veterans will answer questions from students via video, email, and a live audience. The teach-in will focus on the histories and stories of veterans, and will provide information on how communities nationwide can help preserve the stories of veterans and possibly submit them to the Library of Congress' Veterans History Project. This event is part of the Take A Veteran to School Day initiative created by HISTORY. The panel features Robert Patrick, Director of the Veterans History Project, Terry Shima, WWII veteran and Executive Director of the Japanese American Veterans Association, Professor Darlene Iskra, a US Navy veteran of Desert Storm and the first female commander of a US Navy ship, and Jonathan Bickel, a teacher from Eastern Lebanon County High School and part of a teaching-team on veterans history at his school. Dr. Libby O'Connell, Chief Historian for HISTORY, will moderate. This fall, HISTORY will air a 5-part special series presentation entitled WWII in HD premiering on November 15th. Each school or teacher that signs up for the October 21st webcast will receive a colorful WWII in HD poster and a field kit developed by the Veterans History Project of the Library of Congress. (These will be sent in early October and are available while supplies last.) To register for this webcast and the Take a Veteran to School program, visit us at http://www.history.com/content/veterans If you have any additional questions or feedback, contact us at [email protected] There is no registration fee -- HISTORY has fully funded this event. Additional Library of Congress teacher resources relating to Veterans History can be found at http://www.loc.gov/vets/youth-resources.html
Thomas Jefferson’s library helped rebuild the collections of the Library of Congress. His thoughts about the kinds of books Congress might use in its work shaped the mission of the Library. As we think about the role that libraries play in supporting our democracy, the free flow of ideas and the creativity of the American spirit, learn more about the kinds of books Jefferson collected and how they shaped his thinking and his life.
For his second-year project, Juan Felipe Herrera—the 21st Poet Laureate Consultant in Poetry—invites you and your students to collaborate with him to write a story entitled, “The Technicolor Adventures of Catalina Neon.” If you are an elementary school librarian and love inspiring your students not only to read but also to write, we hope you—with your second and third graders—will participate in this exciting online project! The project launches with an introductory chapter and prompt written by Herrera and illustrated by artist Juana Medina. The prompt is posted on the Library of Congress Poetry and Literature Center’s www.read.gov website. We ask that you and your second or third grade students read the prompt, talk about it, imagine what could happen next, and collaboratively write the next chapter of Catalina’s adventure. You will be able to electronically submit your class’s chapter to the Library of Congress. From the chapters submitted, one will be selected, shared, and illustrated—and you and your class will again be invited to write the next chapter of the adventure. The narrative poem will contain six chapters, all guided by input from librarians and students. This process will continue five times until June 2017, when Herrera and Medina will post the final chapter.The Technicolor Adventures of Catalina Neon" is co-presented by the Library’s Educational Outreach Division and the Publishing Office. To view the project, visit www.read.gov/catalinaneon.
Library Hosts Online Conference for EducatorsAs the new school year gets into full swing, the Library of Congress will bring teachers and education experts from across the nation together in its second annual online conference for educators. This free two-day event, “Discover and Explore with Library of Congress Primary Sources,” will be held October 25-26, from 4-8 p.m. EDT and will be open to K-12 educators from across all teaching disciplines. Last year’s event brought together more than 1,500 participants for the sessions.Over the course of two days, there will be 15 one-hour sessions facilitated by Library specialists, instructional experts from the Library’s Teaching with Primary Sources Consortium and other recognized K-12 leaders. Session topics will range from assessments and literacy to historical newspapers and kindergarten historians, and all sessions will focus on the effective use of Library of Congress primary-source documents.According to Lee Ann Potter, director of educational outreach at the Library, "Primary sources can capture student attention, and by analyzing them, students can engage with complex content, build their critical-thinking skills and create new knowledge. The Library’s online conference for educators will allow teachers to learn how to access Library of Congress resources and to discover new strategies for integrating primary sources into their instruction.”Highlights of the conference:The keynote speaker will be the award-winning author Tonya Bolden, who will discuss her process of research for writing children’s books about historical figures.Library experts will include specialists from the Chronicling America historical newspaper archives, the historian of the Library of Congress, professionals from the educational outreach division, and more.Other presenters will include Joel Breakstone from Stanford University, Dan Rothstein of the Right Question Institute, and Kelly Schrum of the Center of History and New Media.After the live online conference, the Library will make recordings of all sessions available to the public on its website for teachers, loc.gov/teachers/. Teachers will be able to earn up to 15 hours of CEU/PDU by participating or viewing online conference sessions, and certificates will be available for completing each session.Register for the conference: www.loc.gov/teachers/professionaldevelopment/webinar/online-conference-2016.html?rssloc=eanft Interested educators can follow the preparations for the conference on Twitter at @TeachingLC and by following #LCTeachConf.
For those who were unable to attend our January 15 webinar on a recording is now available here under January 15th.This webinar provides information on how using an inquiry-driven analysis of a primary source can engage students, pull out key science concepts, and build literacy skills.If you wish to listen to recordings from this and other webinars you can listen to them here.
Join us for a one day workshop for K-12 education that will provide educators with an opportunity to engage in discovery learning to develop strategies for teaching about the events that shaped the civil rights movement, as well as the far-reaching impact the act had on a changing society.Library of Congress education specialists will model strategies for using primary sources to engage students, build critical thinking skills, and construct knowledge. Participants will consider and discuss ways to apply the items and strategies with their students, in their classrooms and school libraries. Activities and primary sources will relate to the Civil Rights Act of 1964, events and conditions leading up to it, and the Library’s exhibition: “The Civil Rights Act of 1964: A Long Struggle for Freedom.” While the emphasis is on classroom teaching strategies, participants will have the opportunity for a docent-led tour of the exhibition. Participants will also be invited to join the Teaching with Primary Sources Teachers Network in order to connect with other educators to continue the conversation about teaching with primary sources. Participants will learn strategies using images, manuscripts, maps, and oral histories and will engage in activities that will help make this era in history “come alive” for students through hands-on activities. When:Select one sessionFriday, February 27, 2015; 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m.Saturday, February 28, 2015; 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m.Space is limited. Applications are available here. Questions? Contact us here!
The Library of Congress and Teaching Tolerance are collaborating on a series of one hour webinars around the Civil Rights Act of 1964. The recording of first of the series, “Civil Rights and Analyzing Images,” conducted on January 22nd is available to view (registration required).
The Library of Congress is now accepting applications for its week-long Summer Institutes for K-12 educators. Held at the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C., these professional development events provide educators with tools and resources to effectively integrate primary sources into K-12 classroom teaching, with an emphasis on student engagement, critical thinking, and construction of knowledge. The Library is offering five Institutes this summer. Three of the Institutes are open to teachers and librarians across the content areas, one focuses on civil rights, and one concentrates on primary sources for science education. Open Institutes Open to K-12 teachers and school librarians across the content areasInstitute Session 1: June 22-26Institute Session 2: July 6-10 Institute Session 3: July 27-31Civil Rights Institute Open to K-12 teachers and school librarians with teaching responsibilities related to the Institute focusCivil Rights Institute: August 3-7Science Institute Recommended for K-12 educators who teach science or collaborate with science teachersScience Institute: July 20-24Applications are due March 24th and require a letter of recommendation. Read more and apply now:http://www.loc.gov/teachers/professionaldevelopment/teacherinstitute/
Applications are now being accepted for the Library of Congress Summer Teacher Institute for Primary Sources in Science Education. The week-long professional development opportunity, taking place July 20-24, is designed for K-12 educators who teach science or collaborate with science teachers. Selected educators will spend a week in Washington, D.C., immersed in the institution that holds papers of the Wright Brothers, Alexander Graham Bell, Carl Sagan, Benjamin Franklin, J. Robert Oppenheimer, Margaret Mead, and many others. In the Institute sessions, we will investigate strategies for using primary sources in the science classroom and build participants’ skills in teaching effectively with photographs, manuscripts, drawings, maps, and other formats from the Library’s collections.The program will include model classroom activities, as well as opportunities to conduct original research, learn from peers, and work side by side with Library curators, experts and education specialists. By the end of the week, each participant will have drafted a primary-source learning activity, with a focus on analyzing historical primary sources to meet a variety of learning goals, particularly around the nature of science, the practices of scientists, and how science, technology and society interact.Tuition and materials are provided at no cost. Participants will be responsible for transportation to and from Washington, D.C., and any required overnight accommodations. Applications are due March 24th and require a letter of recommendation.Read more about the Library of Congress Summer Teacher Institutes and apply now: http://www.loc.gov/teachers/professionaldevelopment/teacherinstitute/
The Library of Congress is now accepting applications for a Summer Teacher Institute for K-12 educators to be held in conjunction with its exhibit focusing on the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the recent deposit of the Rosa Parks collection. The week-long program will focus on strategies for teaching with primary sources—photographs, manuscripts, oral histories, songs, and more from the Library’s collections. Taking place August 3-7 at the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C., this professional development event will provide educators with tools and resources to effectively integrate primary sources into K-12 classroom teaching, with an emphasis on student engagement, critical thinking, and construction of knowledge. The Institute is open to teachers and school librarians across grade and content areas with teaching responsibilities related to civil rights. (Previous participants in a Library of Congress Summer Institute are not eligible.)Tuition and materials are provided at no cost. Selected participants are responsible for transportation to and from Washington, D.C. and any required overnight accommodations. However, through a special grant from the Howard G. Buffett Foundation, Civil Rights Institute participants may be eligible for partial funding to support personal expenses incurred as a result of attending. Selected participants will be notified of the availability of funds at the time they are notified of their acceptance to the Institute.Applications are due March 24th and require a letter of recommendation. Read more about the Library of Congress Summer Teacher Institutes and apply now!
If you were unable to join us for the free webinar “Building Literacy Skills and Teaching about the Civil Rights Movement with Primary Sources” from the Library of Congress and Teaching Tolerance the recording is now available. During this webinar participants analyzed a map and explored the map’s context—the world in which it was created and not just the world that it shows. Education experts discussed the significance of maps, model thinking routines and highlighted items from the exhibition, “The Civil Rights Act of 1964: A Long Struggle for Freedom.”Recordings of previous webinars and information about upcoming webinars from the Library of Congress and Teaching Tolerance can be found on our webinar page.
If you were unable to join us for the Library of Congress free webinar “Primary Sources from the World Digital Library” the recording is now available. Participants engaged in a model primary source analysis, discussed strategies for incorporating primary sources into projects, and heard from Library experts about what the World Digital Library has to offer.Recordings of previous webinars and information about upcoming webinars from the Library of Congress and can be found here.
Apply Now! Library of Congress 2015 Summer Teacher Institutes —Teaching with Primary Sources The Library of Congress is now accepting applications for its week-long Summer Institutes for K-12 educators. Held at the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C., these professional development events provide educators with tools and resources to effectively integrate primary sources into K-12 classroom teaching, with an emphasis on student engagement, critical thinking, and construction of knowledge. The Library is offering five Institutes this summer. Three of the Institutes are open to teachers and librarians across the content areas, one focuses on civil rights, and one concentrates on primary sources for science education. Open Institutes Open to K-12 teachers and school librarians across the content areasInstitute Session 1: June 22-26Institute Session 2: July 6-10 Institute Session 3: July 27-31Civil Rights Institute Open to K-12 teachers and school librarians with teaching responsibilities related to the Institute focusCivil Rights Institute: August 3-7Science Institute Recommended for K-12 educators who teach science or collaborate with science teachersScience Institute: July 20-24Applications are due March 24th and require a letter of recommendation. Read more and apply now:http://www.loc.gov/teachers/professionaldevelopment/teacherinstitute/
The LCPA What If… Science Fiction and Fantasy Forum and the Educational Outreach Team present:Fascinating and Immersive: Strategies, Spaces, and Science Fiction“Fascinating and immersive” are terms that both the Museum of Science Fiction and the Library’s Educational Outreach Team use to describe their approaches to Education. The team creating the Museum believes that science fiction presents an ideal device for sparking interest and spurring proficiency in STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math)and STEAM (including the arts) academic areas.The Library’s Educational Outreach Team agrees—and believes that primary sources related to science and science fiction can inspire students and teachers to embark on lifelong journeys of discovery. Come learn how these two groups are working with science educators and students in compelling ways!Come join us on Tuesday, May 12, 2015, 12:00 Noon in the Mumford Room, 6th Floor, Library of Congress Madison Building and learn how to use science fiction to spark kids' interest in science.Contact Hope O’Keeffe at loke[at]loc.gov for more information.
Immerse yourself in the practice of teaching with primary sources from the unparalleled collections of the Library of Congress this summer. Apply to attend one of the following week-long professional development programs for K-12 educators in the nation's capital:June 20-24 (Science, Technology, and Engineering Focus)June 27 - July 1July 11-15July 18-22July 25-29Each five-day institute provides educators with tools, resources, and strategies to effectively integrate primary sources into K-12 classrooms. Teachers and school librarians of all grade levels and curriculum areas are encouraged to apply to the open sessions, and educators who focus on science, technology, or engineering are invited to apply to the special focus week.Tuition and materials are provided at no cost to participants. However, participants are responsible for transportation to and from the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C., and any required overnight accommodations. Interested participants have the option of completing additional requirements (and paying a fee) to earn three graduate credits from George Mason University.The deadline to submit an application is February 29, 2016.Additional information and the application form can be found here!Insert your message here and repeat the URL from the Header and from the Custom RSS Link in the linked text below.Click here for more information.
Library of Congress 2016 Summer Teacher Institutes –Teaching with Primary SourcesThe Library of Congress is now accepting applications for its week-long summer institutes for K-12 educators. Held at the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C., this professional development opportunity provides educators with tools and resources to effectively integrate primary sources into K-12 classroom teaching, with an emphasis on student engagement, critical thinking, and construction of knowledge. The Library is offering five programs this summer. Four of the programs are open to teachers and librarians across all content areas. One focuses on primary sources in science, technology and engineering. During each five-day institute, participants work with Library education specialists and subject-matter experts to learn effective practices for using primary sources in the classroom, while exploring some of the millions of digitized historical artifacts and documents available on the Library’s website.General Institutes – open to K-12 educators across all content areas: June 27-July 1 July 11-15 July 18-22 July 25-29Science, Technology, and Engineering Institute – recommended for K-12 educators who teach science, technology, or engineering, or collaborate with those who do: June 20-24Tuition and materials are provided at no cost. Participants will be responsible for transportation to and from Washington, D.C., and any required overnight accommodations.Applications are due February 29 and require a letter of recommendation. Read more and apply now !
On December 10, 2016, the Library of Congress will host a free, one-day workshop for K-12 educators interested in incorporating music-related primary sources into their classroom instruction. In this hands-on, collaborative session, education and music specialists from the Library will model a variety of strategies for using music-related primary sources to engage students, build critical thinking skills, and construct knowledge. Through a series of inquiry-based classroom activities, educators will engage with historic audio files, sheet music, song sheets, prints and photographs, and other resources from the Library’s collections. Most of these items are digitized and will be freely available online for teachers to use with their students. In addition to these activities, a reference specialist from the Library’s Music Division will lead a special program on using the Library’s music resources with K-12 students. Certificates are available for teachers completing the workshop. Additional Information: Audience: K-12 music educators and teachers of other disciplines interested in incorporating music-related primary sources into their classroom instruction. When: Saturday, December 10, 2016, from 9 am – 4:30 pm. Where: Whittall Pavilion, Ground Floor, Thomas Jefferson Building, Library of Congress, 10 First St. SE, Washington, DC 20540 Directions here. The room will be open at 8:30 am. Attendees are encouraged to leave plenty of time for travel and to process through security. How to register: Register online here! Apply now, as space is limited.Questions? Please contact: teachinglcsummer@loc.gov
Today’s Thanksgiving holiday has roots in a number of celebrations that occurred centuries ago in different regions of North America. Over time, the United States has come to observe a holiday that has taken many forms and has been observed in many different ways. Students can broaden their perspectives on Thanksgiving – a holiday that is “peculiar to the nation” – with our recently-updated Thanksgiving Primary Source Set.In addition to exploring a variety of holiday traditions, students can also explore Thanksgiving proclamations and read Sarah Hale’s letter to President Lincoln lobbying for the day to become an official national holiday.As with all of the Library’s Primary Source Sets, a Teacher’s Guide is available with background information, teaching ideas and additional resources.Please direct questions to the Resources for Teachers Ask a Librarian page.
The Library's site for Educators, loc.gov/teachers You’re familiar with the Library’s web site for K-12 educators, loc.gov/teachers. We’re proud of the classroom materials, professional development, and other resources we offer on the site. However, we know that there’s always room for improvement, and we know that those improvements start with your input.As we consider adjusting our site to better support the Library’s K-12 educator audience, we’d like to ask for your help. In the comments, please share any insights based on your experience with using the site. We’d love to know what we’re doing right, what we could do more of or do better, and what we could retire.What do you find invaluable about loc.gov/teachers?What functionality or content could we add?What could we safely remove?How else could we improve our online teacher resources?Please send comments to [email protected] We look forward to hearing from you.
The deadline is rapidly approaching to apply for one of the five week-long Summer Teacher Institutes being held at the Library of Congress between June and August this year. Educators will have until March 17 at midnight Pacific Time to apply online.Held at the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C., these unique professional development opportunities provide educators of all disciplines with a host of resources and strategies to successfully use primary sources with their students. Each session will focus on practical teaching strategies, with an emphasis on supporting student engagement, critical thinking, and construction of knowledge.While practicing these core strategies, attendees will also explore some of the millions of digitized historical artifacts and documents available in the Library’s collections. They will meet library experts and conduct research to identify primary sources related to their teaching, with the goal of developing an activity to use with their students in the coming school year. See what some of our previous Institute’s participants have to say about their experience!Five week-long sessions will be offered this summer:General Focus – open to K-12 educators across all content areas:June 19-23June 26-30July 10-14Science, Technology, and Engineering Focus – recommended for K-12 educators who teach science, technology, or engineering, or collaborate with those who do:July 17-21World War I Focus – recommended for K-12 educators who teach some aspect of WWI as part of their curriculum, or collaborate with those who do:July 31-August 4Institute and course materials are provided at no cost. Participants will be responsible for transportation to and from Washington, D.C., and any required overnight accommodations.Apply by March 17! Note that a letter of recommendation will be required. Learn more about the program and fill out the application here.
The Educational Outreach Division of the Library of Congress is seeking applications from current teachers or library/media specialists for an Early Elementary Teacher-in-Residence position during the 2016-17 school year:Educational Outreach develops and delivers teaching materials and programs to make the Library’s unparalleled collections of primary sources visible, accessible, and easy for K-12 teachers to integrate into the classroom. Previous Teachers-in-Residence have led professional development workshops, developed teaching materials, conducted research in the Library’s collections, and led and supported projects to reach a diverse audience of educators nationwide. The Library is seeking applications from early elementary (K-2) teachers in order to better understand the unique needs of young learners when working with primary source materials.Qualifications of successful candidates include:Knowledge of the Library’s digitized primary sources with experience using them in instruction with early learners,Leadership experience, especially in designing and delivering professional development,An innovative, flexible and collaborative work style, able to work on a team in an office environment,Excellent communication skills,The ability to live and work in the Washington, DC, metro area for the duration of the school year.Deadline: Applications Due Tuesday, April 12th.Additional information can be found here.
Primary sources support the study of many disciplines, including both history and geography. One way to help students think about primary sources geographically is to focus them on the five themes of geography: location, place, movement, region, and human-environmental interaction. The latest edition of The TPS Journal, an online publication created by the Library of Congress Educational Outreach Division in collaboration with the TPS Educational Consortium, explores how the five themes of geography can be applied to analyzing primary sources, providing students with multiple perspectives and contributing to greater understanding of a topic.The TPS Journal: Historical and Geographic Thinking contains a full discussion of primary source analysis focused on the five themes of geography, as well as sample lesson plans, additional resources from the Library of Congress, current research on the topic, and more.Want to see previous issues of the Journal? You can read them in the Journal Archives.
In this one-day workshop for K-2 educators, Library of Congress education staff and our current Teacher in Residence, will model a variety of strategies for using primary sources to engage young learners, build critical thinking skills, and construct knowledge. This hands-on, collaborative session will feature maps, prints and photographs, historic audio and film recordings, and other resources from the Library’s collections, all of which are digitized and readily available to teachers after the session. Participants will learn about unique children’s books from the past and ways the Library is making them more accessible. In addition, a specialist from the Young Readers Center will explain resources and non-fiction books that support the K-2 learner. Attendees will receive a personalized certificate for professional development hours. Audience: K- 2 educators interested in incorporating primary sources into their classroom instruction.When: Saturday, May 6, 2017, from 9:00 am – 1:00 pm. Where: Room 119 in the Thomas Jefferson Building, Library of Congress, 10 First St. SE, Washington, DC 20540. (For directions, go here: https://www.loc.gov/visit/directions/) Deadline to apply: April 28, 2017Questions? Please contact: [email protected] Interested in attending? Please fill out the registration form on the page following and email it to [email protected]+Workshop+-+Application.docx