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Library of Congress: News for Teachers

Library of Congress: News for Teachers

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Looking for resources for Constitution Day activities? The Library of Congress has a variety of sources you can use. Explore the Creating the United States online exhibit and learn more about the impact of the Constitution, Bill of Rights and Declaration of Independence on U.S. history. Explore the interactive Constitution where students can learn more about the Constitution and origin of important parts of the Constitution. The Learn More will lead you to links for other exhibits, online resources, webcasts and lessons you can use to help students learn more about the Constitution.
Interested in learning strategies to teach about the Declaration of Independence, the Constitution and the Bill of Rights using Library of Congress primary sources? Register to attend the Library of Congress Creating the US Teacher Institute. Participants will leave with strategies and materials they can use in their schools. The institute uses the Library's exhibition Creating the United States as its foundation. Learn how to make this era in our country’s history “come alive” for student using images, manuscripts, letters, photographs, maps, and poetry.
HISTORY(tm), together with the Veterans History Project of the Library of Congress, will host a National Teach-In on Veterans History on Wednesday, October 21st, 2009 at 12pm EST. Educators and students nationwide can tune-in and view this LIVE webcast online at www.veterans.com. The webcast will be broadcast live from the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C. A panel of educators and veterans will answer questions from students via video, email, and a live audience. The teach-in will focus on the histories and stories of veterans, and will provide information on how communities nationwide can help preserve the stories of veterans and possibly submit them to the Library of Congress' Veterans History Project. This event is part of the Take A Veteran to School Day initiative created by HISTORY. The panel features Robert Patrick, Director of the Veterans History Project, Terry Shima, WWII veteran and Executive Director of the Japanese American Veterans Association, Professor Darlene Iskra, a US Navy veteran of Desert Storm and the first female commander of a US Navy ship, and Jonathan Bickel, a teacher from Eastern Lebanon County High School and part of a teaching-team on veterans history at his school. Dr. Libby O'Connell, Chief Historian for HISTORY, will moderate. This fall, HISTORY will air a 5-part special series presentation entitled WWII in HD premiering on November 15th. Each school or teacher that signs up for the October 21st webcast will receive a colorful WWII in HD poster and a field kit developed by the Veterans History Project of the Library of Congress. (These will be sent in early October and are available while supplies last.) To register for this webcast and the Take a Veteran to School program, visit us at http://www.history.com/content/veterans If you have any additional questions or feedback, contact us at veterans@aetn.com. There is no registration fee -- HISTORY has fully funded this event. Additional Library of Congress teacher resources relating to Veterans History can be found at http://www.loc.gov/vets/youth-resources.html
Thomas Jefferson’s library helped rebuild the collections of the Library of Congress. His thoughts about the kinds of books Congress might use in its work shaped the mission of the Library. As we think about the role that libraries play in supporting our democracy, the free flow of ideas and the creativity of the American spirit, learn more about the kinds of books Jefferson collected and how they shaped his thinking and his life.
The Library's site for Educators, loc.gov/teachers You’re familiar with the Library’s web site for K-12 educators, loc.gov/teachers. We’re proud of the classroom materials, professional development, and other resources we offer on the site. However, we know that there’s always room for improvement, and we know that those improvements start with your input.As we consider adjusting our site to better support the Library’s K-12 educator audience, we’d like to ask for your help. In the comments, please share any insights based on your experience with using the site. We’d love to know what we’re doing right, what we could do more of or do better, and what we could retire.What do you find invaluable about loc.gov/teachers?What functionality or content could we add?What could we safely remove?How else could we improve our online teacher resources?Please send comments to edoutreach@loc.gov. We look forward to hearing from you.
The deadline is rapidly approaching to apply for one of the five week-long Summer Teacher Institutes being held at the Library of Congress between June and August this year. Educators will have until March 17 at midnight Pacific Time to apply online.Held at the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C., these unique professional development opportunities provide educators of all disciplines with a host of resources and strategies to successfully use primary sources with their students. Each session will focus on practical teaching strategies, with an emphasis on supporting student engagement, critical thinking, and construction of knowledge.While practicing these core strategies, attendees will also explore some of the millions of digitized historical artifacts and documents available in the Library’s collections. They will meet library experts and conduct research to identify primary sources related to their teaching, with the goal of developing an activity to use with their students in the coming school year. See what some of our previous Institute’s participants have to say about their experience!Five week-long sessions will be offered this summer:General Focus – open to K-12 educators across all content areas:June 19-23June 26-30July 10-14Science, Technology, and Engineering Focus – recommended for K-12 educators who teach science, technology, or engineering, or collaborate with those who do:July 17-21World War I Focus – recommended for K-12 educators who teach some aspect of WWI as part of their curriculum, or collaborate with those who do:July 31-August 4Institute and course materials are provided at no cost. Participants will be responsible for transportation to and from Washington, D.C., and any required overnight accommodations.Apply by March 17! Note that a letter of recommendation will be required. Learn more about the program and fill out the application here.
The Educational Outreach Division of the Library of Congress is seeking applications from current teachers or library/media specialists for an Early Elementary Teacher-in-Residence position during the 2016-17 school year:Educational Outreach develops and delivers teaching materials and programs to make the Library’s unparalleled collections of primary sources visible, accessible, and easy for K-12 teachers to integrate into the classroom. Previous Teachers-in-Residence have led professional development workshops, developed teaching materials, conducted research in the Library’s collections, and led and supported projects to reach a diverse audience of educators nationwide. The Library is seeking applications from early elementary (K-2) teachers in order to better understand the unique needs of young learners when working with primary source materials.Qualifications of successful candidates include:Knowledge of the Library’s digitized primary sources with experience using them in instruction with early learners,Leadership experience, especially in designing and delivering professional development,An innovative, flexible and collaborative work style, able to work on a team in an office environment,Excellent communication skills,The ability to live and work in the Washington, DC, metro area for the duration of the school year.Deadline: Applications Due Tuesday, April 12th.Additional information can be found here.
Primary sources support the study of many disciplines, including both history and geography. One way to help students think about primary sources geographically is to focus them on the five themes of geography: location, place, movement, region, and human-environmental interaction. The latest edition of The TPS Journal, an online publication created by the Library of Congress Educational Outreach Division in collaboration with the TPS Educational Consortium, explores how the five themes of geography can be applied to analyzing primary sources, providing students with multiple perspectives and contributing to greater understanding of a topic.The TPS Journal: Historical and Geographic Thinking contains a full discussion of primary source analysis focused on the five themes of geography, as well as sample lesson plans, additional resources from the Library of Congress, current research on the topic, and more.Want to see previous issues of the Journal? You can read them in the Journal Archives.
In this one-day workshop for K-2 educators, Library of Congress education staff and our current Teacher in Residence, will model a variety of strategies for using primary sources to engage young learners, build critical thinking skills, and construct knowledge. This hands-on, collaborative session will feature maps, prints and photographs, historic audio and film recordings, and other resources from the Library’s collections, all of which are digitized and readily available to teachers after the session. Participants will learn about unique children’s books from the past and ways the Library is making them more accessible. In addition, a specialist from the Young Readers Center will explain resources and non-fiction books that support the K-2 learner. Attendees will receive a personalized certificate for professional development hours. Audience: K- 2 educators interested in incorporating primary sources into their classroom instruction.When: Saturday, May 6, 2017, from 9:00 am – 1:00 pm. Where: Room 119 in the Thomas Jefferson Building, Library of Congress, 10 First St. SE, Washington, DC 20540. (For directions, go here: https://www.loc.gov/visit/directions/) Deadline to apply: April 28, 2017Questions? Please contact: teachinglcsummer@loc.gov Interested in attending? Please fill out the registration form on the page following and email it to teachinglcsummer@loc.govK-2+Workshop+-+Application.docx
The Library of Congress invites you and your students to join in a virtual program to celebrate El día de los niños/El día de los libros (Children’s Day/Book Day), an official literacy celebration of the American Library Association.Author, illustrator Lulu Delacre, will lead this bilingual celebration by reading and presenting her award-winning book, “Olinguito From A- Z !” in both English and Spanish.“Olinguito From A- Z !” will take place on Thursday, April 27 at 10:30 AM EDT, and will be streamed live at this URL: https://youtu.be/vvSRinFRAQ8We hope you enjoy the program!
Free One-Day Teacher Workshops at The Library of Congress Inspired by the Exhibition, Jacob Riis: Revealing “How the Other Half Lives”Join Library of Congress education specialists on Thursday, July 7, or Friday, August 5, for a one-day workshop inspired by the exhibition, Jacob Riis: Revealing “How the Other Half Lives.” Through collaborative onsite activities, discover teaching strategies for using digitized primary sources—including historic newspapers, photographs, and maps—related to themes of communication and social reform from the Gilded Age to the dawn of the Progressive Era.Click here for details and to register. Space is limited.
Dear Fellow Educators,Knowing that you are making plans for the coming school year now, we wanted to tell you about an exciting opportunity that you may want to include—a project that the Library of Congress will officially be announcing in a few weeks.For his second-year project, Juan Felipe Herrera—the 21st Poet Laureate Consultant in Poetry—wishes to write a story in collaboration with you and your students entitled, “The Technicolor Adventures of Catalina Neon.”If you are an elementary school librarian and love inspiring your students not only to read but also to write, we hope you—with your second and third graders—will participate in this exciting online project!In September 2016, Herrera and artist Juana Medina will post an illustrated prompt which will introduce the fictitious character, Catalina Neon. The prompt will be posted on the Library of Congress Poetry and Literature Center’s website. We ask that you and your second or third grade students read the prompt, talk about it, imagine what could happen next, and collaboratively write the next chapter of Catalina’s adventure.You will be able to electronically submit your class’s chapter to the Library of Congress. From the chapters submitted, one will be selected, shared, and illustrated—and you and your class will again be invited to write the next chapter of the adventure. This process will continue five times until June 2017, when Herrera and Medina will post the final chapter.About the project, Juan Felipe Herrera said, “I am so super-thrilled to be working with you in the Neon near future and your amazing Neoni students (yes, that's their new name once they join up with Catalina Neon!).” Herrera went on to say, “Imagine a Neoni-writing nation creating an original children's book, together with Juana Medina's art downloads and you at the center of the Neon table (really!). All this is my dream: to write with the new sparkly word-artists of our time and to have it all online for the whole planet! Become part of the creative heart of our incredible Library of Congress. I just can't wait to Neon with you.”During the course of this adventure, you and your students may get really excited about writing chapters that follow the ones that are selected and posted by the Library—but you may also be inspired to keep writing the story that you begin with your first chapter. That’s okay too! This initiative is intended to inspire writing and collaboration, creativity and sharing.Stay tuned for more details to come and enjoy the rest of your summer!Sincerely,Lee Ann PotterDirector of Educational Outreach
We are excited to announce that on Monday, August 1, 2016, the Library of Congress will host a STEM Challenge Teacher Workshop from 8:30-12:30, in room 100 of the Library’s Adams Building. Presented by the Joan Ganz Cooney Center at Sesame Workshop and E-Line Media, this workshop is designed to help teachers spark interest in STEM learning among their students by tapping into their natural passion for playing and making video games. Use this link to register for this free workshop. 160222.STEM+Challenge+Teacher+Workshops.pdf
For his second-year project, Juan Felipe Herrera—the 21st Poet Laureate Consultant in Poetry—invites you and your students to collaborate with him to write a story entitled, “The Technicolor Adventures of Catalina Neon.” If you are an elementary school librarian and love inspiring your students not only to read but also to write, we hope you—with your second and third graders—will participate in this exciting online project! The project launches with an introductory chapter and prompt written by Herrera and illustrated by artist Juana Medina. The prompt is posted on the Library of Congress Poetry and Literature Center’s www.read.gov website. We ask that you and your second or third grade students read the prompt, talk about it, imagine what could happen next, and collaboratively write the next chapter of Catalina’s adventure. You will be able to electronically submit your class’s chapter to the Library of Congress. From the chapters submitted, one will be selected, shared, and illustrated—and you and your class will again be invited to write the next chapter of the adventure. The narrative poem will contain six chapters, all guided by input from librarians and students. This process will continue five times until June 2017, when Herrera and Medina will post the final chapter.The Technicolor Adventures of Catalina Neon" is co-presented by the Library’s Educational Outreach Division and the Publishing Office. To view the project, visit www.read.gov/catalinaneon.
Library Hosts Online Conference for EducatorsAs the new school year gets into full swing, the Library of Congress will bring teachers and education experts from across the nation together in its second annual online conference for educators. This free two-day event, “Discover and Explore with Library of Congress Primary Sources,” will be held October 25-26, from 4-8 p.m. EDT and will be open to K-12 educators from across all teaching disciplines. Last year’s event brought together more than 1,500 participants for the sessions.Over the course of two days, there will be 15 one-hour sessions facilitated by Library specialists, instructional experts from the Library’s Teaching with Primary Sources Consortium and other recognized K-12 leaders. Session topics will range from assessments and literacy to historical newspapers and kindergarten historians, and all sessions will focus on the effective use of Library of Congress primary-source documents.According to Lee Ann Potter, director of educational outreach at the Library, "Primary sources can capture student attention, and by analyzing them, students can engage with complex content, build their critical-thinking skills and create new knowledge. The Library’s online conference for educators will allow teachers to learn how to access Library of Congress resources and to discover new strategies for integrating primary sources into their instruction.”Highlights of the conference:The keynote speaker will be the award-winning author Tonya Bolden, who will discuss her process of research for writing children’s books about historical figures.Library experts will include specialists from the Chronicling America historical newspaper archives, the historian of the Library of Congress, professionals from the educational outreach division, and more.Other presenters will include Joel Breakstone from Stanford University, Dan Rothstein of the Right Question Institute, and Kelly Schrum of the Center of History and New Media.After the live online conference, the Library will make recordings of all sessions available to the public on its website for teachers, loc.gov/teachers/. Teachers will be able to earn up to 15 hours of CEU/PDU by participating or viewing online conference sessions, and certificates will be available for completing each session.Register for the conference: www.loc.gov/teachers/professionaldevelopment/webinar/online-conference-2016.html?rssloc=eanft Interested educators can follow the preparations for the conference on Twitter at @TeachingLC and by following #LCTeachConf.
Boys playing warAt your computer, sit and observe this picture for 60 seconds. Now describe what you see. What do you notice first? What do you think is happening? Who do you suppose took the picture and for what purpose? Is there anything you wonder about?Asking and responding to such questions is the cornerstone of students’ learning to think critically and construct their own knowledge. It is also the cornerstone of the Library of Congress’ Summer Teacher Institutes, where educators from across the United States learn how to use primary sources with their students, building skills in observing, reflecting, questioning, determining point of view and more.The image you’ve just inspected is captioned: “A small French boy sitting next to his plan for a trench sector, constructed in miniature form. A U.S. soldier is touching an American flag sticking out of miniature sandbags.” It is one of the thousands of primary sources resources in the Library’s collections related to WWI. From July 31-August 4, the Library of Congress will host a special 5-day WWI-themed Summer Teacher Institute. The session is open to any K-12 educator interested in teaching with primary sources. Tuition and materials for this special event are provided at no cost to participants; participants are responsible for transportation and housing. Applications are due on March 17, 2017. For more information and to apply, go here.The WWI-themed Summer Teacher Institute coincides with a major new exhibit scheduled to open at the Library of Congress this spring: Echoes of the Great War: American Experiences of World War I. 2017 is the 100 year anniversary of the United States’ entry into World War I. As such, WWI Summer Teacher Institute attendees will receive a special tour of this exhibit, viewing hundreds of WWI artifacts, and talk with Library experts to bring them to life. The WWI Summer Teacher institute is one of five Summer Teacher Institutes being offered this summer, between June 19 and August 4. Three of those institutes will be general for all educators, one will be on science, and the final one will focus on WWI. If you are an educator interested in using primary sources with your students, we invite you to apply today!
There are still a few slots available for the Teaching with Primary Sources Face to Face workshop, scheduled for November 4, from 9 am – 4 pm, in the Library’s Thomas Jefferson Building.In this free workshop for K-12 educators of all disciplines, Library of Congress education specialists will model a variety of strategies for using music-related primary sources to engage students, build critical thinking skills, and construct knowledge. Additional activities and presentations will also be led by staff from the National Association for Music Education (NAfME), as well as reference specialists from the Library’s Music Division. For more information and to apply, visit: http://www.loc.gov/teachers/professionaldevelopment/webinar/musicworkshop/?rssloc=eanftRegister TODAY!!!
Today’s Thanksgiving holiday has roots in a number of celebrations that occurred centuries ago in different regions of North America. Over time, the United States has come to observe a holiday that has taken many forms and has been observed in many different ways. Students can broaden their perspectives on Thanksgiving – a holiday that is “peculiar to the nation” – with our recently-updated Thanksgiving Primary Source Set.In addition to exploring a variety of holiday traditions, students can also explore Thanksgiving proclamations and read Sarah Hale’s letter to President Lincoln lobbying for the day to become an official national holiday.As with all of the Library’s Primary Source Sets, a Teacher’s Guide is available with background information, teaching ideas and additional resources.Please direct questions to the Resources for Teachers Ask a Librarian page.