Home » Library of Congress »

Library of Congress: What's New in Science Reference

Library of Congress: What's New in Science Reference

Subscribe to this feed to stay current with new products and services on the subject of science and technology from the Library's Science, Technology & Business Division. Find new Tracer Bullets, Everyday Mysteries, reference guides, upcoming speakers, Webcasts, etc.
News in this category: 30
Bookmark and share this category:  

News

Paul J. Baicich and Margaret A. Barker will present “The Surprising History of Bird Feeding,” based on their book (written with colleague Carrol L. Henderson), Feeding Wild Birds in America: Culture, Commerce and Conservation (Texas A&M University Press, 2015). Books will be for sale at the event, and the authors will sign them after their talk. The lecture will be held in the Mary Pickford Theater, on the third floor of the Library’s James Madison Building, Thursday, May 26, 2016, from 11:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.Click here for more information.
From the blog "Teaching with the Library of Congress": Two new primary source sets from the Library of Congress provide rich opportunities to explore the scope and nature of scientific endeavor.Click here for more information.
This guide lists books, organizations, websites, and other sources of information on the One Health concept, a worldwide strategy for expanding interdisciplinary collaborations and communications in all aspects of health care for humans, animals, and the environment.Click here for more information.
Jack Connerney will present a lecture on the Juno spacecraft mission, designed to improve our understanding of the solar system’s beginnings by revealing the origin and evolution of Jupiter. Dr. Connerney is the mission’s deputy principal investigator and head of the magnetometer team. The talk will be held in the Pickford Theater on the third floor of the Library’s James Madison Building on Thursday, June 23, from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.Click here for more information.
Lynnae Quick, a research scientist at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, discussed her research on using analytical methods to model volcanic and cryo-volcanic processes on the terrestrial planets and the icy moons of the outer solar system.Click here for more information.
A new Everyday Mystery explores the similarities and differences between the multi-legged arthropods millipedes and centipedes.Click here for more information.
Gong Ping Yeh, a physicist at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, U.S. Department of Energy, discussed his current research in sustainable energy including wind, solar, biofuels, electric vehicles and ocean energy.Click here for more information.
Jeremy Schnittman, an astrophysicist at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, discussed the "habitability zone" around supermassive black holes and discussed the Hollywood movie "Interstellar" in light of the physics governing accretion, relativity and astrobiology.Click here for more information.
Paul Baicich and Margaret Barker discussed their book, "Feeding Wild Birds in America: Culture, Commerce & Conservation," written with colleague Carrol Henderson. The book describes how the simple practice of bird feeding has become a multi-billion dollar business and helped change Americans’ attitudes toward the natural world.Click here for more information.
Dr. Bernadette Dunham, a visiting professor, Milken Institute School of Public Health, George Washington University, and former Director, Center for Veterinary Medicine, Food and Drug Administration, discussed interconnections of human and animal health with environmental health.Click here for more information.
Dr. C. Alex Young will present "A Space Weather Report: Preparing Space Explorers for Bad Weather Throughout the Solar System." Dr. Young is the Associate Director of Science for the Heliophysics Science Division at Goddard Space Flight Center and will discuss how NASA is dealing with the threats of bad weather in space to make sure that it will be safe for future travelers. The lecture will be held in the Mary Pickford Theater, on the third floor of the Library’s James Madison Building, Thursday, September 29, 2016, from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.Click here for more information.
On October 19, planetary geologist Dr. Kelsey Young will present “The Future of Planetary Surface Exploration,” where she will highlight the development of portable tools and technology that will accompany future astronauts. Dr. Young is a research scientist at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center whose research interests include using sites on Earth as testing grounds for advancing planetary field geology and developing the technology needed to carry out geologic and geochemical observations on other planetary surfaces. The lecture will be held in the Mary Pickford Theater, on the third floor of the Library’s James Madison Building, Wednesday, October 19, 2016, from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Click here for more information.
Ira Thorpe, astrophysicist at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, discusses instruments built to detect and observe gravitational waves in an effort to learn more about the cosmological events of our universe.Click here for more information.
On November 16, Professor Virginia Murray, public health physician and consultant at Global Disaster Risk Reduction, Public Health England, will speak at the Library of Congress about disaster risk reduction and management from a public health point of view.¬ Using the Fukushima nuclear power plant disaster in Japan and examples from many other countries, Professor Murray will address how the implementation of the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction may be used to construct a comprehensive, multidimensional approach to reduce disaster risk over the next 15 years.¬ The lecture will be held on Wednesday, November 16, 2016, from 1:00 p.m. to 2:00 p.m. in the Mary Pickford Theater, on the third floor of the Library's James Madison Building.Click¬ here for more information.
Dr. Elizabeth Platz,¬ cancer epidemiologist and a professor in the Bloomberg School of Public Health at Johns Hopkins University, discusses the current state of research and treatment of prostate cancer as part of Prostate Cancer Awareness Month.Click¬ here for more information.
The last time humans walked on the surface of the Moon was during the final Apollo mission, Apollo 17, launched in December 1972.¬ The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) was launched in June 2009 and has been gathering data on the lunar environment that will help pave the way for humans to return to the Moon and for future human exploration of our solar system.¬ Noah Petro, NASA lunar geologist and Deputy Project Scientist for the¬ Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) mission, will talk about LRO's observations of the Apollo 17 landing site, and what new things we have learned about what happened on the Moon 44 years ago.¬ The lecture will be held in the Mary Pickford Theater, on the 3rd floor of the Library's James Madison Building, Tuesday, December 6, 2016 from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.Click¬ here for more information.
On Tuesday, May 3, Dr. Jeremy Schnittman, a research astrophysicist at NASA‚Äôs Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, will present a lecture called "The Science of Interstellar: Life on Planets Around Black Holes" in the Pickford Theater on the third floor of the Library's James Madison Building from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. His presentation will address the ‚Äúhabitability zone‚ÄĚ around supermassive black holes and will discuss the Hollywood movie in light of the physics governing accretion, relativity, and astrobiology.Click¬ here for more information.
Dr. Gong Ping (G.P.) Yeh, world renowned high energy physicist, will present a lecture in the Pickford Theater on the third floor of the Library's James Madison Building on Thursday, May 5, 2016 from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.¬ His lecture, World Energy Transformation: Asia and Beyond, will address sustainable energy and improving energy efficiencies. This lecture is co-sponsored by the Science, Technology & Business Division and the LC Asian American Association in honor of Asian-Pacific American Heritage month.Click¬ here for more information.
Joanna Lewis, professor in the School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University, discusses China's role in developing clean energy technology.Click¬ here for more information.
A panel discussion on the Cancer Moonshot Initiative and the patient's role in advancing cancer research and participation in clinical trials will be held in Dining Room A on the 6th floor of the Library's James Madison Building on Thursday, December 15, 2016, from 11:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.¬ The White House Cancer Moonshot Task Force was established in January 2016 by President Barack Obama and is chaired by Vice President Joe Biden.¬ Panel participants will include representatives of the White House Cancer Moonshot Task Force and other organizations interested in advancing cancer research.Click¬ here for more information.
Jason P. Dworkin, chief of the Astrochemistry Laboratory at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, discussed OSIRIS-REx, the first U.S. space mission that will return samples from an asteroid to Earth.¬ ¬ The sample will be shared with and studied by scientists all over the world and will help them understand the formation of our solar system.¬ Click¬ here to view the webcast.
C. Alex Young, heliophysicist and coordinator for education and public outreach at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, discussed the challenges of dealing with the harshness of space and making sure travelers can safely reach their destination as they reach for the planets and beyond.Click¬ here for more information.
Presidential Food: Selected Resource Guide has been revised and updated.¬ This reference guide highlights White House cookbooks, resources on entertaining at the White House, and general histories of presidential food, as well as books detailing food favorites of individual presidents.¬ A sample bibliography of magazine and newspaper articles and websites is also included.Click¬ here for more information.
A new post from the Teaching with the Library of Congress blog highlights some primary sources for teaching and learning about the science of snow and snowflakes.Click¬ here for more information.
A new Everyday Mystery explains the concept of biomimicry and presents examples of its use in innovation and engineering design.Click¬ here for more information.