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Library of Congress: What's New in Science Reference

Library of Congress: What's New in Science Reference

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Dr. Elizabeth Platz,¬ cancer epidemiologist and a professor in the Bloomberg School of Public Health at Johns Hopkins University, discusses the current state of research and treatment of prostate cancer as part of Prostate Cancer Awareness Month.Click¬ here for more information.
The last time humans walked on the surface of the Moon was during the final Apollo mission, Apollo 17, launched in December 1972.¬ The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) was launched in June 2009 and has been gathering data on the lunar environment that will help pave the way for humans to return to the Moon and for future human exploration of our solar system.¬ Noah Petro, NASA lunar geologist and Deputy Project Scientist for the¬ Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) mission, will talk about LRO's observations of the Apollo 17 landing site, and what new things we have learned about what happened on the Moon 44 years ago.¬ The lecture will be held in the Mary Pickford Theater, on the 3rd floor of the Library's James Madison Building, Tuesday, December 6, 2016 from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.Click¬ here for more information.
On Tuesday, May 3, Dr. Jeremy Schnittman, a research astrophysicist at NASA‚Äôs Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, will present a lecture called "The Science of Interstellar: Life on Planets Around Black Holes" in the Pickford Theater on the third floor of the Library's James Madison Building from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. His presentation will address the ‚Äúhabitability zone‚ÄĚ around supermassive black holes and will discuss the Hollywood movie in light of the physics governing accretion, relativity, and astrobiology.Click¬ here for more information.
Dr. Gong Ping (G.P.) Yeh, world renowned high energy physicist, will present a lecture in the Pickford Theater on the third floor of the Library's James Madison Building on Thursday, May 5, 2016 from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.¬ His lecture, World Energy Transformation: Asia and Beyond, will address sustainable energy and improving energy efficiencies. This lecture is co-sponsored by the Science, Technology & Business Division and the LC Asian American Association in honor of Asian-Pacific American Heritage month.Click¬ here for more information.
Joanna Lewis, professor in the School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University, discusses China's role in developing clean energy technology.Click¬ here for more information.
A panel discussion on the Cancer Moonshot Initiative and the patient's role in advancing cancer research and participation in clinical trials will be held in Dining Room A on the 6th floor of the Library's James Madison Building on Thursday, December 15, 2016, from 11:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.¬ The White House Cancer Moonshot Task Force was established in January 2016 by President Barack Obama and is chaired by Vice President Joe Biden.¬ Panel participants will include representatives of the White House Cancer Moonshot Task Force and other organizations interested in advancing cancer research.Click¬ here for more information.
Jason P. Dworkin, chief of the Astrochemistry Laboratory at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, discussed OSIRIS-REx, the first U.S. space mission that will return samples from an asteroid to Earth.¬ ¬ The sample will be shared with and studied by scientists all over the world and will help them understand the formation of our solar system.¬ Click¬ here to view the webcast.
C. Alex Young, heliophysicist and coordinator for education and public outreach at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, discussed the challenges of dealing with the harshness of space and making sure travelers can safely reach their destination as they reach for the planets and beyond.Click¬ here for more information.
Presidential Food: Selected Resource Guide has been revised and updated.¬ This reference guide highlights White House cookbooks, resources on entertaining at the White House, and general histories of presidential food, as well as books detailing food favorites of individual presidents.¬ A sample bibliography of magazine and newspaper articles and websites is also included.Click¬ here for more information.
A new post from the Teaching with the Library of Congress blog highlights some primary sources for teaching and learning about the science of snow and snowflakes.Click¬ here for more information.
A new Everyday Mystery explains the concept of biomimicry and presents examples of its use in innovation and engineering design.Click¬ here for more information.
NASA planetary geologist Kelsey Young discusses her work designing new tools and technologies to collect and interpret geochemical and geophysical data.¬ These technologies will need to have the flexibility to be used in different capacities during spaceflight and will need to be incorporated into astronaut extravehicular activities.Click¬ here for more information.
Ilya Zaslavsky, director of the Spatial Information Systems Lab at the San Diego Supercomputer Center, University of California San Diego, will be speaking at the Library of Congress about online systems for visual analysis, sharing of surveys and image collections, and applications for analyzing indicators of sustainable development goals.¬ Dr. Zaslavsky's research focuses on distributed information management systems and spatial and temporal data integration.¬ The talk will take place on Thursday, February 23, 2017, in the Montpelier Room, James Madison Building, 11:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.Click¬ here for more information.
A new Everyday Mystery explores the concept of measuring ingredients by weight to make a better cookie.Click¬ here for more information.
Lance B. Price, Ph.D., professor of environmental and occupational health at George Washington University's Milken Institute School of Public Health, discussed the science and politics behind the use of antibiotics in hospitals and farming.Click¬ here to view the webcast.
Geneticist and evolutionary biologist Adam Wilkins will discuss his book, Making Faces: the Evolutionary Origins of the Human Face, on Wednesday, March 29, 2017 in the Library's Pickford Theater from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.¬ Dr. Wilkins' lecture will identify distinctive features of the human face, explore how and why our unique facial features evolved, and detail the critical role facial expression plays in human society.Click¬ here for more information.
A panel discussion with representatives of the White House Cancer Moonshot Task Force and other organizations interested in cancer research.¬ Participants include Ellen V. Sigal, founder and chairperson of Friends of Cancer Research; Dinah S. Singer, director of cancer biology at the National Cancer Institute and co-chair of the White House Cancer Moonshot Task Force; Douglas Lowy, director of the National Cancer Institute; and Louis Weiner, director of the Georgetown Lombardi Cancer Center.Click¬ here to view the webcast.
The 2017 lineup of the Earth and Space Science lecture series at the Library of Congress has been announced.¬ The lecture series is a partnership between the Library's Science, Technology & Business Division and the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center.¬ Starting on April 18th and ending on December 7th, the series of eight lectures will be held in the Library's Mary Pickford Theater from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.Click¬ here for more information.
In the opening program of the 2017 season of the Science, Technology and Business Division’s NASA Goddard lecture series, Julie McEnery will take the audience on a journey of the energetic Universe - a dramatic new view of the celestial sky. Dr. McEnery is the Fermi Project Scientist and an astrophysicist in the Astroparticle Physics Laboratory at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center. Launched in June 2008, the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (FGST) is an international multi-agency space observatory with two main instruments: the Large Area Telescope (LAT), the primary instrument which surveys the entire sky every three hours; and the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM), a complementary instrument which studies gamma-ray bursts. The lecture will be held in the Mary Pickford Theater, on the 3rd floor of the Library's James Madison Building, Tuesday, April 18, 2017 from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Click here for more information.
Surfer, sailor, and marine conservationist Jonathan White will discuss his latest book, Tides: The Science and Spirit of the Ocean, at noon on Thursday, April 20, 2017, in the Mary Pickford Theater, 3rd floor of the Library's James Madison Building. Mr. White takes readers on a tour across the world’s oceans to discover the science and lore of ocean tides, examining and exploring the largest, fastest, scariest, and most amazing tides in the world. This Books & Beyond event is co-sponsored with the Library’s Center for the Book. Mr. White will sign copies of his book following the presentation. Click here for more information.
The last time humans walked on the surface of the Moon was during the final Apollo mission, Apollo 17, launched in December 1972.¬ The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) was launched in June 2009 and has been gathering data on the lunar environment that will help pave the way for humans to return to the Moon and for future human exploration of our solar system.¬ Noah Petro, NASA lunar geologist and Deputy Project Scientist for the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) mission, discussed LRO's observations of the Apollo 17 landing site, and what new things we have learned about what happened on the Moon 44 years ago.Click¬ here to view the video.
A new Everyday Mystery presents interesting facts about the octopus and answers the question "Can an octopus get to know you?"Click¬ here for more information.
NASA research scientist Kelsey Young will present ‚ÄúNASA Extreme Environment Mission Operations (NEEMO): Preparing Astronauts for Space Exploration‚ÄĚ in the Pickford Theater, third floor, Madison Building, Library of Congress, on Thursday, May 4, 2017, from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.¬ NEEMO is a NASA mission which began in 2001 and sends groups of astronauts, engineers and scientists from many countries to live and work for up to three weeks at a time in Aquarius, the world‚Äôs only undersea research station, which functions as an analog for space exploration.¬ Dr. Young will talk about the results of the NEEMO 21 mission and plans for the upcoming NEEMO 22 mission, and how these tests fit into plans to once again send humans beyond low-Earth orbit.Click¬ here for more information.
On Wednesday, May 10, 2017, Christopher Ketcham will discuss the need to balance the economic value of commercial space ventures with safety and ethical concerns for life on Earth and in space. In addition to the problem of possible interplanetary contamination, Earth’s outer atmosphere is littered with human-generated debris, and spacecraft and satellites are vulnerable to collision with this debris. Safety and ethical concerns are particularly important as commercial space travel becomes a reality. Dr. Ketcham will explore what kinds of safeguards are in place to ensure that these problems do not intensify and will discuss whether we are prepared for the risks of accidents occurring in space. The lecture will be held in the Library's Pickford Theater, third floor of the Madison Building, Wednesday, May 10, 2017, from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.Click here for more information.
C. Alex Young, solar astrophysicist and Associate Director of Science for the Heliophysics Science Division at Goddard Space Flight Center, will speak about the science and wonder of total solar eclipses. He will explain the celestial mechanics of the total solar eclipse on August 21, 2017, viewing opportunities, and will discuss how NASA will be studying the sun and Earth during this rare event.¬ This lecture will be held on Thursday June 15 in the Library's Pickford Theater, from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Click¬ here for more information.