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Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers

Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers

Notices of new content, points of interest, use and reuse of our collection of digitized newspapers.
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Today at Chronicling America, we’re celebrating the start of Summer with articles talking about options for a #VintageVacation from our historical newspapers, selected and tweeted by institutions participating in the National Digital Newspaper Program. Join us today and share your own discoveries! Follow us every 3rd Tuesday of the month on Twitter for a #ChronAmParty!
Happy Flag Day! The flag of the United States was first adopted on June 14, 1777. Read a poem printed in the Harrisburg Telegraph newspaper here and follow us on twitter @librarycongress #ChronAm!
Attention subscriber to bulletin services from the Library of Congress:As you may be aware, on May 25, 2018, the EU General Data Protection Regulation EU (2016)/679 (GDPR) came into force in all EU member states. The GDPR applies to “personal data,” meaning any information relating to an identifiable person who can be directly or indirectly identified by reference to an identifier. It requires that personal data be processed lawfully, fairly and in a transparent manner, and that personal data be collected for specified and legitimate purposes.For those who subscribe to the Library’s email and RSS bulletins, the Library of Congress collects email addresses which can include personal data. The Library of Congress relies on its legitimate interests to process this data so that we can keep you up to date with developments for the topics to which you subscribe. The Library does not make any other use of this data.The Library respects your personal data and takes care to maintain its confidentiality. You have the right to unsubscribe from the Library’s e-mail newsletters and alerts at any time. You can manage your subscriptions by clicking “Subscriber Preferences” in the box at the bottom of this email.If you have any questions about the Library’s data privacy policy, please email the Library: ogc@loc.gov
While Memorial Day originally commemorated those who died in the US Civil War, during the Great War (World War I) focus began to shift to honoring all those killed during military service in all wars. The National Endowment for the Humanities' Division of Preservation and Access blog this week explores the Evolution of Memorial Day and tips for learning more about the topic in Chronicling America. As mentioned in the post, the Library also provides search tips and examples of articles from Chronicling America describing public celebrations and how the holiday developed over time, including the "Memorial Day--Its Origin" in the May 29, 1919 issue of the Jasper News (Jasper, MO). Check out these useful resources for searching the holiday’s history in Chronicling America's historic newspapers, and be sure follow us on Twitter @librarycongress #ChronAm!
Where did the term "flapper" come from? What did she look like? Find out more about flapper lingo and the "It" girl of the 1920s in our new blog, Headlines and Heroes: Newspaper, Comics & More Fine Print! Sponsored by the Library's Serial and Government Publications Division, the blog will feature stories and highlights from the Library's extensive collections of newspapers, including Chronicling America, as well as our comic book collection and other highlights.In addition to the millions of pages of newspapers selected and digitized by other libraries for Chronicling America, did you know the Library of Congress has more than 29 miles of shelves of its own newspapers? Read more about it and keep following us on Twitter @librarycongress #ChronAm!
Babe Ruth began his career as a baseball pitcher, but quickly became one of the most prolific hitters in the history of the sport. His sheer power earned him comparisons to Thor and Hercules and the awe-inspired appellations: the “Sultan of Swat,” the “Battering Bambino,” the “Mighty Mauler,” and the “Home Run King,” among others. Read more about Babe Ruth in our online guide and learn how to search for related articles in the Chronicling America: American Historic Newspapers digital collection (http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/). Don't forget to follow us on Twitter @librarycongress #ChronAm!
The Washington Times reports that “the Japenese [sic] cherry trees which were presented to the United States by the government of Japan a year ago….are blooming here for the first time…..” This second donation of trees sent by Japan to Washington DC were initially planted in Potomac Park, which has since become a popular destination to see these beautiful blossoms! Read more about the history of the cherry trees in Washington DC here and follow us on Twitter @librarycongress #ChronAm!
Check out Twitter today to find stories from Chronicling America, selected and tweeted by libraries participating in the National Digital Newspaper Program. Discover more about #LoveBeforeTinder including Romance, Courtship and Terrible Relationship Advice! Follow us every 3rd Tuesday of the month on Twitter at #ChronAmParty!
“SKATERS WILL TAKE PART IN THE INAUGURAL EVENTS” declares the January 25, 1924 issue of the Evening Star – clearing up any potential drama that the US might not participate! The first event of the first Winter Olympics, held in Chamonix, France January 25-February 5, 1924, was the 500m speed skating race – which was won by American Charles Jewtraw! Read more about the first Winter Olympics here and follow us on Twitter @librarycongress #ChronAM!
Taking inspiration from Jules Verne's fictional book, Around the World in Eighty Days, fearless journalist Nellie Bly sets out to girdle the globe "without escort." She arrives in Jersey City, New Jersey January 25, 1890 "with but a little hand-bag of neccessaries and the one plain navy gown she wore on the bright morning of November 14 when she sailed away on the steamship Augusta Victoria" 72 days prior. Click here for more details of her triumphal record-breaking journey in The Evening World's Nellie Bly Extra and don’t forget to follow us on Twitter @librarycongress #ChronAm!
library of congressNews from the Library of CongressDecember 27, 2017Collage of Library-related imagesMake Your Gift Before the End of 2017The Library's resolution for 2018 is to offer moreopportunities to engage lifelong learners like you with our unique treasuresand programs. Makeyour gift before we close the books on 2017! Your gift can: Inspire curiosity in children like Daliyah—our firstLibrarian of the Day—to read more books, and students—like our A Book That Shaped Me contest winners—to reflect on the power of books to change their livesIgnite thoughtful conversation among current and future generations ofstudents and scholars Illuminate the minds of people like you who use the resources of the nation's Library here in Washington or via the Internet in their own homes and communitiesWith the help of supporters like you, we can spark theimagination of people of all ages with programs that open the Library's doorswide to all.Join us TODAY by making your2017 tax-deductible donation, and together we'll spark a lifelongadventure of learning. Thank you!SusanK. SiegelDirectorof Development DONATE NOW
Did you know that even just a century ago “The belief that animals have the gift of speech on Christmas Eve ha[d] not entirely died out in Europe” or that “Christmas Eve up to the eighteenth century was a time for auguries.” The Bridgeport Evening Farmer explored these less well known – and some more well-known - Christmas Eve traditions in their issue from January 13, 1917. Read more about Mummers, special blessings, and supernatural events from “Christmas Eve of Long Ago” here and follow us on twitter @librarycongress #ChronAM!Click here for more information.
Gifting teddy bears this holiday season? Did you know that they have a close tie to Presidential history? In November 1902, then President Theodore Roosevelt refused to kill a bear while hunting, inspiring cartoonist Clifford Berryman to create a political cartoon featuring the President and a bear cub, which ran in the Washington Post. Berryman’s bears made frequent appearances in his cartoons during Roosevelt’s presidency, closely linking the image of the Teddy Bear with the President. This link initially lead people to declare the Teddy Bear a fad that would end with the Roosevelt presidency. The Teddy Bear, however, lived on, becoming a classic American toy! Read about its presidential history in #ChronAm!Click here for more information.
On this day 150 years ago in Boston, Charles Dickens gave a public reading of "A Christmas Carol" and other stories, his first public reading in the United States. “Hardly a notable man in Boston, or fifty miles about, but was there, and we doubt if in London itself Mr. Dickens ever read before such an assemblage," reported the Evening Telegraph. The assemblage included fellow authors and poets such as Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, James Russel Lowell, and Richard Henry Dana Sr. Read more about it here and follow us on twitter @librarycongress #ChronAM!
@NEH Tweets: Apply by January 11th for the NDNP grant program, which helps create a national digital resource of historically significant newspapers published between 1690 and 1963, from all the states and U.S. territories. http://ow.ly/yHHM30grGvL . The National Digital Newspaper Program, jointly sponsored by the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Library of Congress, supports digitization of historic newspapers across the country for inclusion in the Chronicling America Web site, hosted by the Library. Read more about it at or http://www.loc.gov/ndnp/ and follow us on Twitter @librarycongress #ChronAm!
library of congressNews from the Library of CongressNovember 21, 2017Patrons examining Library of Congress collectionsSpark a Lifelong Adventure of LearningThis year, for the first time, the Library of Congress isparticipating in #GivingTuesday—a global giving movement. On Tuesday, November28, we are asking you to make a gift to spark a lifelong adventure of learning. Here's more information.The Library of Congress is your library, your gateway tounderstanding the world. There is so much to discover, not only the nation'smemory, but the world's—information from all corners of the earth, in more than470 languages. With millions of items available online, you can access theLibrary's treasures from anywhere.Save the Date to Make Your Gift!Celebratedon the Tuesday following Thanksgiving (in the U.S.) and the widely recognizedshopping events Black Friday and Cyber Monday, #GivingTuesday kicks off thecharitable season, when many focus on their holiday and end-of-year giving. DONATE NOW
The Library of Congress has made some significant updates and additions to the Chronicling America web site recently:Newspapers selected and digitized by the Alaska State Library and History Colorado began to be added to the more than 12 million pages from 41 other states and territories and the District of ColumbiaExpanded coverage of the twentieth-century newspapers, with some newspapers published up to 1943 now available (and more in process, up to 1963) - see http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/newspapers/ and sort by Latest Issue Available to see the most recentAdding to non-English newspapers already available published in French, German, and Spanish, Chronicling America now includes newspapers published by and for U. S. ethnic and immigrant communities in Croatian, Czech, Danish, Finnish, Italian, Icelandic, Polish, Slovenian and Swedish with more on the way. (Newspapers in these languages are now accessible from the site through browsing with the Ethnicity filter on http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/#tab=tab_newspapers and general keyword search - additional language-specific search filters will be added shortly.)Updated software (github.com/LibraryOfCongress/chronam) and server architecture to improve performance and redundancy of resources.Now more than 12.4 million pages available, published 1789-1943, from 2361 titles, contributed by 43 states and territories and the Library of CongressExplore Chronicling America and point your RSS feed reader to http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/newspapers/feed/ for details on Recent Additions. Follow us on Twitter @librarycongress #ChronAm!
Sloths slurp soup upside-down?! So suggests the 1916 Day Book (Chicago, IL) in a brief (and illustrated) article highlighting attributes and behaviors of “the toe-nail sloth” in modern society. Read more about it and celebrate International Sloth Day (October 20)! Don’t forget to follow us on Twitter @librarycongress #ChronAm!
Is it your lucky or unlucky day? For some Friday the 13th just a date on the calendar. But if you're superstitious, you might want to "put that rabbit's foot in your pocket 'till the evenin sun goes down" or travel the "straight and narrow, unless it takes you underneath a ladder." Check out this article for more Friday the 13th suggestions and don't forget to follow us on Twitter @libraryofcongress #ChronAm!
On October 1, 1903, the Boston Americans play the Pittsburgh Pirates in the 1st game of the modern World Series. In the month before the game, a compromise known as the National Agreement resolved the conflict between the rival American and National Leagues and laid the foundation for the World Series that continues to this day. Check out this article for more and don't forget to follow us on Twitter @libraryofcongress #ChronAm!
Can you help identify illustrations and transcribe captions in World War One-era newspapers from Chronicling America? As announced this week by the Library of Congress, one of the first features of the new labs.loc.gov is Beyond Words, a website that invites the public to identify cartoons and photographs in historic newspapers and provide captions that will turn images into searchable data. This fun crowdsourcing program grows the data set of text available for researchers who use visualization, text analysis and other digital humanities methodologies to discover new knowledge from Chronicling America—the Library’s large collection of historic American newspapers. Beyond Words is available as a pilot project to help the Library of Congress learn more about what subsets of Library data researchers are interested in and to grow the Library’s capacity for crowdsourcing.“What I like about crowdsourcing is it gives people a chance to discover hidden gems in the collection. You never know what you’ll find poking through old newspapers,” said Tong Wang, the IT specialist who created Beyond Words during a three-month pilot innovator-in-residence program.Beyond Words will also generate public domain image galleries for scholarship and creative play. As this data set grows, educators, researchers and artists will be able to group image collections by time frame, such as identifying all historic cartoons appearing in World War I-era newspapers.Try the Beyond Words pilot crowdsourcing application ...Read more about it and follow us on Twitter @librarycongress #ChronAm!
What did we know about the how’s and why’s of a total eclipse of the sun in 1869? Having experienced a total eclipse in North America just a few years prior in 1860, newspaper readers of 1869 were eager for information. The Evening Telegraph (Philadelphia, PA) presented that and more just before the August 7 event, providing a combination of science, story and conjecture to describe the phenomena, declaring “No approach to totality can give the slightest conception of the effect produced the instant that the last ray of light is extinguished.” On Monday, August 21, 2017 millions across America will make their own observations of this rare occurrence. Read more about it and follow us on Twitter @librarycongress #ChronAm #Eclipse2017!