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Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers

Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers

Notices of new content, points of interest, use and reuse of our collection of digitized newspapers.
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In mid-December 1916, Germany suddenly and unexpectedly proposed peace to the Allied nations of Europe involved in “the Great War.” Newspapers across America, still neutral in the conflict, announced the offer with surprise and glaring headlines. From the optimistic “The Dawn of Peace” (Bryan Daily Eagle and Pilot; Bryan, TX) and “End of World-Wide Conflict Near” (Bemidji Daily Pioneer; Bemidji, MN) to the dismay of Britain’s immediate response “England Receives Proposal Coldly” (New York Tribune; New York, NY) and “Peace Move Not Taken Seriously” (The Daily Gate City and Constitution-Democrat; Keokuk, IA), America watched the war from afar with growing trepidation and debate…. Read more about it and follow us on Twitter @librarycongress #ChronAm!
On Jan. 8, 1790, beginning with "Fellow Citizens of the Senate and the House of Representatives, I embrace with great satisfaction the opportunity, which now presents itself, of congratulating you on the present favorable prospects of our public affairs...." President George Washington delivered the first State of the Union address to the joint session of Congress meeting in New York City, the U.S. capital at the time.... Read more about it and and follow us on Twitter @librarycongress #ChronAm!
First published in late January 1845, “The Raven” by Edgar A. Poe quickly caught the attention of readers far and wide with its dark and gothic imagery. It soon appeared in numerous newspapers and magazines across the country including the Feb. 4, 1845 issue of the New-York Daily Tribune (New York, NY). "Once upon a midnight dreary..." Read more about it and follow us on Twitter @librarycongress #ChronAm!
That’s a lotta barks! Judges line up as 1,612 canines make their way to Grand Central Palace for the Westminster Kennel Club’s exhibition. For a full re-pawt of the 44th annual show, look no fur-ther than the New-York Tribune (New York, NY) issue for February 8, 1920. Read more about it and follow us on Twitter @librarycongress #ChronAm!
55 African American newspapers from across the US, are available online in #ChronAm. Included among these titles are issues of Frederick Douglass’ newspaper the New National Era. In his first issue, Douglass writes “It has been a cherished hope of mine, since the abolition of slavery, that…some new man…thoroughly alive to the great interests of our newly enfranchised people, would arise and establish here in the Capital of the nation a large public journal, which should in some measure serve as a banner on the outer wall of our liberties…I believe the New National Era can be made such a journal…” #BlackHistoryMonth Read more about it and follow us on Twitter @librarycongress #ChronAm!
Known as “the Good Gray Poet,” Walt Whitman, author of Leaves of Grass and other poems, died peacefully in March 1892 in Camden, NJ, after a long illness. With a sorrowful tone, the Wilmington Daily Republican (Wilmington, DE) provided details along with reflections on his literary accomplishments and critics. “His critics ‘cut him up,’” according to the paper… Read more about it and follow us on Twitter @librarycongress #ChronAm!
After more than two years of remaining neutral in the conflict happening 'over there,' President Woodrow Wilson issues a proclamation on April 6, 1917 to the people of the country declaring a state of war exists between the United States and the Imperial Government of Germany. The first act of war was to seize all 91 German ships in American waters, weighing a total tonnage of 594,696, the news reports.... Read more about it and explore our Recommended Topics by Subject to learn about more about what newspapers reported during World War I! Follow us on Twitter @librarycongress #ChronAm!
We’re asking for your help to understand how you, the users, work with our online newspapers! The Library of Congress is investigating new approaches to providing access to the historic newspapers available from the Chronicling America Web site. We’re looking at adding new features and updating others, as well as integrating the historic newspapers with related materials from the Library’s overall collections like maps, photographs, handwritten letters and more!If you use historic digitized newspapers in Chronicling America, please take a few minutes and answer our simple anonymous survey (only 6 quick questions!) describing a few key features we’re thinking about.Please respond by COB Wednesday, May 17.We appreciate your feedback and thank you!
In the heart of San Francisco, CA, on May 12, 1903, President Theodore Roosevelt was greeted by throngs of spectators. The following day the San Francisco Call (San Francisco, CA) reported on the parade in detail, describing the military splendor, decorations on Market Street, bells pealing out and the roar of the crowd. In addition to coverage in historic newspapers, the Library of Congress also provides access to a rare early silent film of the parade, where you can see Roosevelt standing in his carriage and waving to the throngs… you can almost hear him say, as quoted in the Call, “This is magnificent.”….Read (and see!) more about it and follow us on Twitter @librarycongress #ChronAm!
Did you know that Memorial Day used to be known as Decoration Day? Or that the practice of honoring the war dead during spring first arose in the South as the Civil War ended? Featuring newspapers from around the country during the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, discover more about the fascinating history of this holiday….Read more about it and follow us on Twitter @NEH_PresAccess and @librarycongress #ChronAm!
The famous and gay poet Walt Whitman often wrote stories for newspapers. His recently rediscovered serial novel, “Life and Adventures of Jack Engle,” a purported first-person autobiography, appeared anonymously in the Sunday Dispatch (New York , NY), March 14 through April 18, 1852. A front page ad in the New-York Daily Tribune of March 13, 1852 promised “A RICH REVELATION.” Whitman’s sensational tale of a poor orphan’s true heritage slipped into obscurity until 2016, when researcher Zachary Turpin connected the Whitman-esque style of the ad and the name “Jack Engle” to an 1852 Whitman notebook in the Library of Congress' Manuscript Division. Whitman had jotted down plot lines, characters, and scenes he used in the story. The only full set of newspaper issues in which Whitman’s “lost” novel was originally printed is now available digitally in Chronicling America and this weekend (June 8-10), the originals are on display at the Library’s “Pride in the Library” pop-up exhibit. In addition to newspapers, this exhibition features a range of items from the Library’s extensive LGBTQ+ collections…. Read more about it, learn more about Walt Whitman through newspapers, and follow us on Twitter @librarycongress #ChronAm and @Events_LOC #LCPride!
“Some years ago a gentle, inoffensive stranger landed on this terrestrial sphere with no luggage but a book….This was Mr. Skygack from Mars,” wrote Fred Schaefer, author of the comic “Mr. Skygack, from Mars” in the Day Book (Chicago, IL) in 1912. This early comic strip first began appearing in newspapers associated with the Scripps publishing conglomerate in 1907. Explore Mr. Skygack’s wry observations of human behavior through our Recommended Topics page and, this week (June 14-17), join us at LC for our “Library of Awesome” pop-up exhibit highlighting gems from our extensive collection of comic books. This exhibition features famous comic-book issues, drawings, original comic strips and related items…. Read more about it, learn more about comics in historic newspapers, and follow us on Twitter @librarycongress #ChronAm and @Events_LOC #LCcomics!
For the past 6 years, in the little town of Whitesbog, New Jersey, a "remarkable woman" has been doing remarkable work in the quietest sort of way. By applying eugenic principles, Elizabeth White produces the first crop of cultivated “super-blueberries.” Read more about it in Philadelphia's Evening Public Ledger and follow us on Twitter @librarycongress #ChronAm!
Attempting what only a handful of daredevil flyers would dream of, “birdman” Harry N. Atwood made a record-breaking 14-day multi-leg trip from Boston to Washington, DC, at the helm of a Moth biplane. Several days after his arrival, "the biplane scudded and clipped over the Tidal Basin, its wings all a-quiver," as he landed on the White House grounds just in time for a luncheon held in his honor. For the “strength of his exploits”, he was presented the gold medal of the Washington Aero Club by President Taft himself. Read more about the adventurous airman and follow us on Twitter @librarycongress #ChronAm!
Telework – 1912 style! “All parts of vacation land…are within easy ‘commuting distance’…” With the services provided by the New York Telephone Company “…the busy man can enjoy his summer vacation…and yet not neglect his affairs in town.“ Read more about it and follow us on Twitter @librarycongress #ChronAm!
from the National Endowment for the Humanities:We are happy to announce the addition of two new partners to the National Digital Newspaper Program: Arkansas and Georgia. NEH recently made awards to the Arkansas State Archives and the University of Georgia to digitize their historic newspapers and contribute to the Chronicling America web site....Read more about it and follow us on Twitter @NEH_PresAccess and @librarycongress #ChronAm!
What did we know about the how’s and why’s of a total eclipse of the sun in 1869? Having experienced a total eclipse in North America just a few years prior in 1860, newspaper readers of 1869 were eager for information. The Evening Telegraph (Philadelphia, PA) presented that and more just before the August 7 event, providing a combination of science, story and conjecture to describe the phenomena, declaring “No approach to totality can give the slightest conception of the effect produced the instant that the last ray of light is extinguished.” On Monday, August 21, 2017 millions across America will make their own observations of this rare occurrence. Read more about it and follow us on Twitter @librarycongress #ChronAm #Eclipse2017!
Can you help identify illustrations and transcribe captions in World War One-era newspapers from Chronicling America? As announced this week by the Library of Congress, one of the first features of the new labs.loc.gov is Beyond Words, a website that invites the public to identify cartoons and photographs in historic newspapers and provide captions that will turn images into searchable data. This fun crowdsourcing program grows the data set of text available for researchers who use visualization, text analysis and other digital humanities methodologies to discover new knowledge from Chronicling America—the Library’s large collection of historic American newspapers. Beyond Words is available as a pilot project to help the Library of Congress learn more about what subsets of Library data researchers are interested in and to grow the Library’s capacity for crowdsourcing.“What I like about crowdsourcing is it gives people a chance to discover hidden gems in the collection. You never know what you’ll find poking through old newspapers,” said Tong Wang, the IT specialist who created Beyond Words during a three-month pilot innovator-in-residence program.Beyond Words will also generate public domain image galleries for scholarship and creative play. As this data set grows, educators, researchers and artists will be able to group image collections by time frame, such as identifying all historic cartoons appearing in World War I-era newspapers.Try the Beyond Words pilot crowdsourcing application ...Read more about it and follow us on Twitter @librarycongress #ChronAm!
On October 1, 1903, the Boston Americans play the Pittsburgh Pirates in the 1st game of the modern World Series. In the month before the game, a compromise known as the National Agreement resolved the conflict between the rival American and National Leagues and laid the foundation for the World Series that continues to this day. Check out this article for more and don't forget to follow us on Twitter @libraryofcongress #ChronAm!
Is it your lucky or unlucky day? For some Friday the 13th just a date on the calendar. But if you're superstitious, you might want to "put that rabbit's foot in your pocket 'till the evenin sun goes down" or travel the "straight and narrow, unless it takes you underneath a ladder." Check out this article for more Friday the 13th suggestions and don't forget to follow us on Twitter @libraryofcongress #ChronAm!
Sloths slurp soup upside-down?! So suggests the 1916 Day Book (Chicago, IL) in a brief (and illustrated) article highlighting attributes and behaviors of “the toe-nail sloth” in modern society. Read more about it and celebrate International Sloth Day (October 20)! Don’t forget to follow us on Twitter @librarycongress #ChronAm!
The Library of Congress has made some significant updates and additions to the Chronicling America web site recently:Newspapers selected and digitized by the Alaska State Library and History Colorado began to be added to the more than 12 million pages from 41 other states and territories and the District of ColumbiaExpanded coverage of the twentieth-century newspapers, with some newspapers published up to 1943 now available (and more in process, up to 1963) - see http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/newspapers/ and sort by Latest Issue Available to see the most recentAdding to non-English newspapers already available published in French, German, and Spanish, Chronicling America now includes newspapers published by and for U. S. ethnic and immigrant communities in Croatian, Czech, Danish, Finnish, Italian, Icelandic, Polish, Slovenian and Swedish with more on the way. (Newspapers in these languages are now accessible from the site through browsing with the Ethnicity filter on http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/#tab=tab_newspapers and general keyword search - additional language-specific search filters will be added shortly.)Updated software (github.com/LibraryOfCongress/chronam) and server architecture to improve performance and redundancy of resources.Now more than 12.4 million pages available, published 1789-1943, from 2361 titles, contributed by 43 states and territories and the Library of CongressExplore Chronicling America and point your RSS feed reader to http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/newspapers/feed/ for details on Recent Additions. Follow us on Twitter @librarycongress #ChronAm!
library of congressNews from the Library of CongressNovember 21, 2017Patrons examining Library of Congress collectionsSpark a Lifelong Adventure of LearningThis year, for the first time, the Library of Congress isparticipating in #GivingTuesday—a global giving movement. On Tuesday, November28, we are asking you to make a gift to spark a lifelong adventure of learning. Here's more information.The Library of Congress is your library, your gateway tounderstanding the world. There is so much to discover, not only the nation'smemory, but the world's—information from all corners of the earth, in more than470 languages. With millions of items available online, you can access theLibrary's treasures from anywhere.Save the Date to Make Your Gift!Celebratedon the Tuesday following Thanksgiving (in the U.S.) and the widely recognizedshopping events Black Friday and Cyber Monday, #GivingTuesday kicks off thecharitable season, when many focus on their holiday and end-of-year giving. DONATE NOW
@NEH Tweets: Apply by January 11th for the NDNP grant program, which helps create a national digital resource of historically significant newspapers published between 1690 and 1963, from all the states and U.S. territories. http://ow.ly/yHHM30grGvL . The National Digital Newspaper Program, jointly sponsored by the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Library of Congress, supports digitization of historic newspapers across the country for inclusion in the Chronicling America Web site, hosted by the Library. Read more about it at or http://www.loc.gov/ndnp/ and follow us on Twitter @librarycongress #ChronAm!
On this day 150 years ago in Boston, Charles Dickens gave a public reading of "A Christmas Carol" and other stories, his first public reading in the United States. “Hardly a notable man in Boston, or fifty miles about, but was there, and we doubt if in London itself Mr. Dickens ever read before such an assemblage," reported the Evening Telegraph. The assemblage included fellow authors and poets such as Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, James Russel Lowell, and Richard Henry Dana Sr. Read more about it here and follow us on twitter @librarycongress #ChronAM!