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Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers

Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers

Notices of new content, points of interest, use and reuse of our collection of digitized newspapers.
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"President Wilson's signing Thursday [June 15] of the act incorporating the Boy Scouts of America puts that organization on a proper basis, and makes it a national institution more definitely than before." Based on Robert Baden-Powell's international scouting movement, the Boy Scouts of America (BSA) was a remarkable institution that expanded rapidly following its introduction into America in 1910. Primary goals of the American movement were to help boys develop the skills, the knowledge, and the "character" required to better serve themselves and their country. Read more about it and follow us on Twitter @librarycongress #ChronAm! Click here for more information.
The comic cat and mouse team later known as Krazy and Ignatz make their brick-hurling debut together on July 26, 1910 in the “Dingbat Family Comic,” created by cartoonist George Herriman. Find more Krazy and Ignatz (and the Dingbats) in Chronicling America! Click here for more information.
Shark attack! Scientists say we have these brainy fishes to thank for our ears and moveable jaws but they are still at odds over whether the viviparous creatures are in fact, man-eating monsters. Read more about it!
FROM NEH: We are happy to announce the addition of four new partners to the National Digital Newspaper Program! NEH has made awards to digitize historic newspapers to the Alaska Division of Libraries, Archives, and Museums; the Colorado Historical Society; the Maine State Library, and Rutgers University in New Jersey.... Read more about it at http://www.neh.gov/divisions/preservation/featured-project/alaska-colorado-maine-and-new-jersey-join-the-national-digital-newspaper-program. Click here for more information on the National Digital Newspaper Program (NDNP) or explore the newspapers themselves at Chronicling America!
When a Congressional act is passed on August 25, 1916 establishing the National Park Service, the first order of business for Director Stephen T. Mather is: touring the parks. An avid promoter of nature and its preservation, Mather had previously led a campaign advocating for government oversight of parks in the United States. Read more about it!
During the summer of 1893 President Grover Cleveland informs reporters he is embarking upon a four-day cruise on a friend’s yacht to “do a little fishing.” But why is Dr. Joseph Bryant aboard? And what’s with the makeshift operating room they’ve installed? An innocent recreational cruise or does President Cleveland have a grave health issue to hide? Read more about it!
In September 1916, British military forces debut a new weapon of war on the battlefields of France – the "tank." One reporter describes the machines as "incredible as a nightmare or one of Jules Verne’s fantastic imaginings.” Read more about it!
After 59 days and an extra 3, 500 miles on the odometer, Alice Ramsey (“a plucky little woman”) with three sister motor-maids in tow arrived to San Francisco in a dust-covered Maxwell 30. The party was welcomed by a gathering of enthusiasts, most of whom had closely followed their transcontinental journey from Hell’s Gate, Manhattan in the press. Read more about it!
Heading to the shore this weekend? The July 19, 1903 edition of the St. Louis Republic offers some exercises to try while on your outing. Find out more unique ways to stay healthy in the summer months and follow us on Twitter @librarycongress #ChronAm! Click here for more information.
“It is our melancholy duty to announce the death of Gen. Zachary Taylor, President of the United States…His splendid military achievements won the admiration of his countrymen, - his simplicity of character a large measure of their confidence” reports the Southern Press (Washington, DC) on the July 9, 1850 death of President Taylor. Read more about it and follow us on Twitter @librarycongress #ChronAm!Click here for more information.
Highlighting the social movement towards calmer patriotic celebrations, this 1911 chewing gum ad graphically asks the reader “Why not spend the fireworks money for the mintleaf juice confection?” Find more articles about “Safe and Sane” 4th of July celebrations on this Topics Page (http://www.loc.gov/rr/news/topics/4july.html) and follow us on Twitter @librarycongress #ChronAm!Click here for more information.
100 Years Ago: “Move Clocks Up One Hour To Save Time” Rock Island Argus, May 20, 1916Two years before the US began its daylight savings time, Britain implemented a ‘daylight saving act’ which ran from May 20th -September 30th. “There is a small old fashioned section of people, who have derided the daylight saving scheme but they will practically be forced into line by its acceptance in all public institutions” including banks, trains, and factories which all conformed with the new time schedule. Read more about it and follow us on Twitter @librarycongress #ChronAm!Click here for more information.
Celebrate Earth Day and the final days of National Poetry Month with some tree poetry: “He who plants a tree,/He plants love;/Tents of coolness spreading out/ above./ Heaven and earth help him/ who plants a tree. /And his work its own reward shall be.” Read more about it and follow us on Twitter @librarycongress #ChronAm!Click here for more information.
President Wilson “…put the German issue, the Mexican problem, and all other dull cares in a pigeon-hole in the Executive Office for two hours…” and opened the 1916 baseball season for the Washington Nationals, who played against the New York Yankees at home. “Of course the Nationals won.” Read more about it and follow us on Twitter @librarycongress #ChronAm!Click here for more information.
100 Years Ago: "Special Operator Wards Off ‘April Fools’ Calls to Zoo,”Evening Public Ledger, April 1, 1916April 1, 1916 was certainly fool (pun intended) of All Fool’s Day gags and the Bell Telephone operator working in the Preston exchange took the brunt of many a jokester. When phony phone calls poured in (600 by noon!), the operator had to explain that Mr. Wolf, Mr. Bear, and Mr. Camel were not actually “bonafide human beings, but respectable animal residents of the Zoological Gardens,” writes the Evening Public Ledger. Read more about it and follow us on Twitter @librarycongress #ChronAm! Click here for more information.
The 1913 Armory Show, which introduced the American public to cubism and Modern Art, was unfavorably reviewed by the Evening World, saying “No words in the English language and no combination of words are adequate to describe these Cubist pictures, about which we have heard so much.” Read more about it and follow us on Twitter @librarycongress #ChronAm!Click here for more information.
On the centennial of Abraham Lincoln’s birthday in 1909, President Theodore Roosevelt issued a proclamation designating Feb. 12 “a special legal holiday” in honor of the former President. With illustrations and a biographical timeline, the Daily Missoulian (Missoula, MT) highlighted the new holiday…. Read more about it and follow us on Twitter @librarycongress #ChronAm! Click here for more information.
Although women’s right to vote would not be assured until 1920, in November 1872 Susan B. Anthony, along with others, “presented herself to the eighth ward [Rochester, NY] and insisted on being registered…” to vote in the U.S. presidential election, according to the Evening Star (Washington, DC). Ten days later she was arrested and eventually fined. Read more about it and follow us on Twitter @librarycongress #ChronAm!Click here for more information.
The National Digital Newspaper Program (NDNP) grant guidelines for 2017 are now available at http://www.neh.gov/grants/preservation/national-digital-newspaper-program. The deadline for submitting proposals is January 12, 2017. Program awardees participate in the creation of a national, digital resource of historically-significant public domain newspapers published in U.S. states and territories. This program is jointly sponsored by the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) and the Library of Congress (LC). Each award supports a 2-year project to digitally convert 100,000 newspaper pages from that state's collections for contribution to the Chronicling America website, maintained by the LC. For a list of current participants, see http://www.loc.gov/ndnp/awards/.For more program information, please visit the NEH's program page at http://www.neh.gov/grants/preservation/national-digital-newspaper-program or for technical information, visit the LC site at http://www.loc.gov/ndnp/ .... Read more about it and follow us on Twitter @librarycongress #ChronAm!See NEH 2017 Grant Application Guidelines
For non-meat eaters and the frugal, a century ago the Perrysburg Journal (Perrysburg, OH) shared suggestions for a feast of Thanksgiving dishes fit for the most discerning vegetarian palate. Including such delectables as Cream of Chestnut Soup, Vegetable Turkey (2 kinds!), and Nesselrode Pudding (a frozen custard dessert), the result is a choice menu for any celebration... Read more about it!
In mid-December 1916, Germany suddenly and unexpectedly proposed peace to the Allied nations of Europe involved in “the Great War.” Newspapers across America, still neutral in the conflict, announced the offer with surprise and glaring headlines. From the optimistic “The Dawn of Peace” (Bryan Daily Eagle and Pilot; Bryan, TX) and “End of World-Wide Conflict Near” (Bemidji Daily Pioneer; Bemidji, MN) to the dismay of Britain’s immediate response “England Receives Proposal Coldly” (New York Tribune; New York, NY) and “Peace Move Not Taken Seriously” (The Daily Gate City and Constitution-Democrat; Keokuk, IA), America watched the war from afar with growing trepidation and debate…. Read more about it and follow us on Twitter @librarycongress #ChronAm!
On Jan. 8, 1790, beginning with "Fellow Citizens of the Senate and the House of Representatives, I embrace with great satisfaction the opportunity, which now presents itself, of congratulating you on the present favorable prospects of our public affairs...." President George Washington delivered the first State of the Union address to the joint session of Congress meeting in New York City, the U.S. capital at the time.... Read more about it and and follow us on Twitter @librarycongress #ChronAm!
First published in late January 1845, “The Raven” by Edgar A. Poe quickly caught the attention of readers far and wide with its dark and gothic imagery. It soon appeared in numerous newspapers and magazines across the country including the Feb. 4, 1845 issue of the New-York Daily Tribune (New York, NY). "Once upon a midnight dreary..." Read more about it and follow us on Twitter @librarycongress #ChronAm!
That’s a lotta barks! Judges line up as 1,612 canines make their way to Grand Central Palace for the Westminster Kennel Club’s exhibition. For a full re-pawt of the 44th annual show, look no fur-ther than the New-York Tribune (New York, NY) issue for February 8, 1920. Read more about it and follow us on Twitter @librarycongress #ChronAm!
55 African American newspapers from across the US, are available online in #ChronAm. Included among these titles are issues of Frederick Douglass’ newspaper the New National Era. In his first issue, Douglass writes “It has been a cherished hope of mine, since the abolition of slavery, that…some new man…thoroughly alive to the great interests of our newly enfranchised people, would arise and establish here in the Capital of the nation a large public journal, which should in some measure serve as a banner on the outer wall of our liberties…I believe the New National Era can be made such a journal…” #BlackHistoryMonth Read more about it and follow us on Twitter @librarycongress #ChronAm!