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Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers

Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers

Notices of new content, points of interest, use and reuse of our collection of digitized newspapers.
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After 59 days and an extra 3, 500 miles on the odometer, Alice Ramsey (“a plucky little woman”) with three sister motor-maids in tow arrived to San Francisco in a dust-covered Maxwell 30. The party was welcomed by a gathering of enthusiasts, most of whom had closely followed their transcontinental journey from Hell’s Gate, Manhattan in the press. Read more about it!
Heading to the shore this weekend? The July 19, 1903 edition of the St. Louis Republic offers some exercises to try while on your outing. Find out more unique ways to stay healthy in the summer months and follow us on Twitter @librarycongress #ChronAm! Click here for more information.
“It is our melancholy duty to announce the death of Gen. Zachary Taylor, President of the United States…His splendid military achievements won the admiration of his countrymen, - his simplicity of character a large measure of their confidence” reports the Southern Press (Washington, DC) on the July 9, 1850 death of President Taylor. Read more about it and follow us on Twitter @librarycongress #ChronAm!Click here for more information.
Highlighting the social movement towards calmer patriotic celebrations, this 1911 chewing gum ad graphically asks the reader “Why not spend the fireworks money for the mintleaf juice confection?” Find more articles about “Safe and Sane” 4th of July celebrations on this Topics Page (http://www.loc.gov/rr/news/topics/4july.html) and follow us on Twitter @librarycongress #ChronAm!Click here for more information.
100 Years Ago: “Move Clocks Up One Hour To Save Time” Rock Island Argus, May 20, 1916Two years before the US began its daylight savings time, Britain implemented a ‘daylight saving act’ which ran from May 20th -September 30th. “There is a small old fashioned section of people, who have derided the daylight saving scheme but they will practically be forced into line by its acceptance in all public institutions” including banks, trains, and factories which all conformed with the new time schedule. Read more about it and follow us on Twitter @librarycongress #ChronAm!Click here for more information.
Celebrate Earth Day and the final days of National Poetry Month with some tree poetry: “He who plants a tree,/He plants love;/Tents of coolness spreading out/ above./ Heaven and earth help him/ who plants a tree. /And his work its own reward shall be.” Read more about it and follow us on Twitter @librarycongress #ChronAm!Click here for more information.
President Wilson “…put the German issue, the Mexican problem, and all other dull cares in a pigeon-hole in the Executive Office for two hours…” and opened the 1916 baseball season for the Washington Nationals, who played against the New York Yankees at home. “Of course the Nationals won.” Read more about it and follow us on Twitter @librarycongress #ChronAm!Click here for more information.
100 Years Ago: "Special Operator Wards Off ‘April Fools’ Calls to Zoo,”Evening Public Ledger, April 1, 1916April 1, 1916 was certainly fool (pun intended) of All Fool’s Day gags and the Bell Telephone operator working in the Preston exchange took the brunt of many a jokester. When phony phone calls poured in (600 by noon!), the operator had to explain that Mr. Wolf, Mr. Bear, and Mr. Camel were not actually “bonafide human beings, but respectable animal residents of the Zoological Gardens,” writes the Evening Public Ledger. Read more about it and follow us on Twitter @librarycongress #ChronAm! Click here for more information.
The 1913 Armory Show, which introduced the American public to cubism and Modern Art, was unfavorably reviewed by the Evening World, saying “No words in the English language and no combination of words are adequate to describe these Cubist pictures, about which we have heard so much.” Read more about it and follow us on Twitter @librarycongress #ChronAm!Click here for more information.
On the centennial of Abraham Lincoln’s birthday in 1909, President Theodore Roosevelt issued a proclamation designating Feb. 12 “a special legal holiday” in honor of the former President. With illustrations and a biographical timeline, the Daily Missoulian (Missoula, MT) highlighted the new holiday…. Read more about it and follow us on Twitter @librarycongress #ChronAm! Click here for more information.
Although women’s right to vote would not be assured until 1920, in November 1872 Susan B. Anthony, along with others, “presented herself to the eighth ward [Rochester, NY] and insisted on being registered…” to vote in the U.S. presidential election, according to the Evening Star (Washington, DC). Ten days later she was arrested and eventually fined. Read more about it and follow us on Twitter @librarycongress #ChronAm!Click here for more information.
The National Digital Newspaper Program (NDNP) grant guidelines for 2017 are now available at http://www.neh.gov/grants/preservation/national-digital-newspaper-program. The deadline for submitting proposals is January 12, 2017. Program awardees participate in the creation of a national, digital resource of historically-significant public domain newspapers published in U.S. states and territories. This program is jointly sponsored by the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) and the Library of Congress (LC). Each award supports a 2-year project to digitally convert 100,000 newspaper pages from that state's collections for contribution to the Chronicling America website, maintained by the LC. For a list of current participants, see http://www.loc.gov/ndnp/awards/.For more program information, please visit the NEH's program page at http://www.neh.gov/grants/preservation/national-digital-newspaper-program or for technical information, visit the LC site at http://www.loc.gov/ndnp/ .... Read more about it and follow us on Twitter @librarycongress #ChronAm!See NEH 2017 Grant Application Guidelines
For non-meat eaters and the frugal, a century ago the Perrysburg Journal (Perrysburg, OH) shared suggestions for a feast of Thanksgiving dishes fit for the most discerning vegetarian palate. Including such delectables as Cream of Chestnut Soup, Vegetable Turkey (2 kinds!), and Nesselrode Pudding (a frozen custard dessert), the result is a choice menu for any celebration... Read more about it!
In mid-December 1916, Germany suddenly and unexpectedly proposed peace to the Allied nations of Europe involved in “the Great War.” Newspapers across America, still neutral in the conflict, announced the offer with surprise and glaring headlines. From the optimistic “The Dawn of Peace” (Bryan Daily Eagle and Pilot; Bryan, TX) and “End of World-Wide Conflict Near” (Bemidji Daily Pioneer; Bemidji, MN) to the dismay of Britain’s immediate response “England Receives Proposal Coldly” (New York Tribune; New York, NY) and “Peace Move Not Taken Seriously” (The Daily Gate City and Constitution-Democrat; Keokuk, IA), America watched the war from afar with growing trepidation and debate…. Read more about it and follow us on Twitter @librarycongress #ChronAm!
On Jan. 8, 1790, beginning with "Fellow Citizens of the Senate and the House of Representatives, I embrace with great satisfaction the opportunity, which now presents itself, of congratulating you on the present favorable prospects of our public affairs...." President George Washington delivered the first State of the Union address to the joint session of Congress meeting in New York City, the U.S. capital at the time.... Read more about it and and follow us on Twitter @librarycongress #ChronAm!
First published in late January 1845, “The Raven” by Edgar A. Poe quickly caught the attention of readers far and wide with its dark and gothic imagery. It soon appeared in numerous newspapers and magazines across the country including the Feb. 4, 1845 issue of the New-York Daily Tribune (New York, NY). "Once upon a midnight dreary..." Read more about it and follow us on Twitter @librarycongress #ChronAm!
That’s a lotta barks! Judges line up as 1,612 canines make their way to Grand Central Palace for the Westminster Kennel Club’s exhibition. For a full re-pawt of the 44th annual show, look no fur-ther than the New-York Tribune (New York, NY) issue for February 8, 1920. Read more about it and follow us on Twitter @librarycongress #ChronAm!
55 African American newspapers from across the US, are available online in #ChronAm. Included among these titles are issues of Frederick Douglass’ newspaper the New National Era. In his first issue, Douglass writes “It has been a cherished hope of mine, since the abolition of slavery, that…some new man…thoroughly alive to the great interests of our newly enfranchised people, would arise and establish here in the Capital of the nation a large public journal, which should in some measure serve as a banner on the outer wall of our liberties…I believe the New National Era can be made such a journal…” #BlackHistoryMonth Read more about it and follow us on Twitter @librarycongress #ChronAm!
Known as “the Good Gray Poet,” Walt Whitman, author of Leaves of Grass and other poems, died peacefully in March 1892 in Camden, NJ, after a long illness. With a sorrowful tone, the Wilmington Daily Republican (Wilmington, DE) provided details along with reflections on his literary accomplishments and critics. “His critics ‘cut him up,’” according to the paper… Read more about it and follow us on Twitter @librarycongress #ChronAm!
After more than two years of remaining neutral in the conflict happening 'over there,' President Woodrow Wilson issues a proclamation on April 6, 1917 to the people of the country declaring a state of war exists between the United States and the Imperial Government of Germany. The first act of war was to seize all 91 German ships in American waters, weighing a total tonnage of 594,696, the news reports.... Read more about it and explore our Recommended Topics by Subject to learn about more about what newspapers reported during World War I! Follow us on Twitter @librarycongress #ChronAm!
We’re asking for your help to understand how you, the users, work with our online newspapers! The Library of Congress is investigating new approaches to providing access to the historic newspapers available from the Chronicling America Web site. We’re looking at adding new features and updating others, as well as integrating the historic newspapers with related materials from the Library’s overall collections like maps, photographs, handwritten letters and more!If you use historic digitized newspapers in Chronicling America, please take a few minutes and answer our simple anonymous survey (only 6 quick questions!) describing a few key features we’re thinking about.Please respond by COB Wednesday, May 17.We appreciate your feedback and thank you!
In the heart of San Francisco, CA, on May 12, 1903, President Theodore Roosevelt was greeted by throngs of spectators. The following day the San Francisco Call (San Francisco, CA) reported on the parade in detail, describing the military splendor, decorations on Market Street, bells pealing out and the roar of the crowd. In addition to coverage in historic newspapers, the Library of Congress also provides access to a rare early silent film of the parade, where you can see Roosevelt standing in his carriage and waving to the throngs… you can almost hear him say, as quoted in the Call, “This is magnificent.”….Read (and see!) more about it and follow us on Twitter @librarycongress #ChronAm!
Did you know that Memorial Day used to be known as Decoration Day? Or that the practice of honoring the war dead during spring first arose in the South as the Civil War ended? Featuring newspapers from around the country during the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, discover more about the fascinating history of this holiday….Read more about it and follow us on Twitter @NEH_PresAccess and @librarycongress #ChronAm!
The famous and gay poet Walt Whitman often wrote stories for newspapers. His recently rediscovered serial novel, “Life and Adventures of Jack Engle,” a purported first-person autobiography, appeared anonymously in the Sunday Dispatch (New York , NY), March 14 through April 18, 1852. A front page ad in the New-York Daily Tribune of March 13, 1852 promised “A RICH REVELATION.” Whitman’s sensational tale of a poor orphan’s true heritage slipped into obscurity until 2016, when researcher Zachary Turpin connected the Whitman-esque style of the ad and the name “Jack Engle” to an 1852 Whitman notebook in the Library of Congress' Manuscript Division. Whitman had jotted down plot lines, characters, and scenes he used in the story. The only full set of newspaper issues in which Whitman’s “lost” novel was originally printed is now available digitally in Chronicling America and this weekend (June 8-10), the originals are on display at the Library’s “Pride in the Library” pop-up exhibit. In addition to newspapers, this exhibition features a range of items from the Library’s extensive LGBTQ+ collections…. Read more about it, learn more about Walt Whitman through newspapers, and follow us on Twitter @librarycongress #ChronAm and @Events_LOC #LCPride!
“Some years ago a gentle, inoffensive stranger landed on this terrestrial sphere with no luggage but a book….This was Mr. Skygack from Mars,” wrote Fred Schaefer, author of the comic “Mr. Skygack, from Mars” in the Day Book (Chicago, IL) in 1912. This early comic strip first began appearing in newspapers associated with the Scripps publishing conglomerate in 1907. Explore Mr. Skygack’s wry observations of human behavior through our Recommended Topics page and, this week (June 14-17), join us at LC for our “Library of Awesome” pop-up exhibit highlighting gems from our extensive collection of comic books. This exhibition features famous comic-book issues, drawings, original comic strips and related items…. Read more about it, learn more about comics in historic newspapers, and follow us on Twitter @librarycongress #ChronAm and @Events_LOC #LCcomics!