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Library of Congress: New Webcasts

Library of Congress: New Webcasts

New webcasts of events, lectures and performances from the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C.
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Jonathan Gardner discussed some of the most important astronomical discoveries of the last 20 years, the Hubble Space Telescope's greatest accomplishments and the promise of its successor, the James Webb Space Telescope.Click here to watch the video.
Pianist Solungga Liu performed the music of Charles Griffes, Amy Beach, Claude Debussy and Csar Franck. Selections were drawn largely from manuscript holdings at the Library of Congress.Prior to the concert, David Plylar discussed the Library's collection of holograph manuscripts by composer Charles Griffes. This includes a "rediscovered" transcription by Griffes of "Les parfums de la nuit" from the Iberia section of "Images" by Claude Debussy; Solungga Liu's performance at the Library of November 4, 2017, is believed to be the world premiere of this transcription. Click here to watch the concert.Click here to watch the pre-concert lecture.
The Library of Congress showcased a display of Colombian treasures from our vast Latin American collections, including the papers Simn Bolivar and Francisco de Paula Santander, rare literary audio recordings of Colombian writers and poets, and unique prints and photographs.Click here to watch the video.
Sarah Jones discussed two of NASA's newest missions, GOLD (Global-scale Observations of the Limb and Disk) and ICON (Ionospheric Connections Explorer), which will determine how weather shapes the Earth's interface to space.Click here to watch the video.
The Center for the Book in the Library of Congress sponsored a daylong conference on literacy called "Reading Promotion and the Battle to Keep People Reading." There were two morning and three afternoon sessions. This conference can be viewed across three webcasts.Watch: Morning Sessions: "A Nation of Readers: America's Reading Habits" and "Reading Promotion: What Works, What Doesn't and Opportunities for Innovation"Watch: Afternoon Session 1: "Developing and Sustaining Readers Across the Lifespan"Watch: Afternoon Sessions 2 & 3: "Accessibility Matters: Readers with Disabilities" and "Diverse Books: Current State and the Future."
Best-selling author Becky Albertalli talks about the impact of her young adult novel "Simon vs. The Homo Sapiens Agenda" that was adapted to film as "Love, Simon.Click here to watch the video.
From daguerreotype plates to silver gelatin papers, 19th-century manufacturers supplied photographers with materials to produce photographic images. But because so few of these papers are identifiable, the history of these manufacturers and their materials are untraceable and virtually unknown. Within the Library of Congress' vast holdings of photographic technology manuals, original 19th-century samples of identified photographic papers survive. Senior Photographic Conservator Adrienne Lundgren discusses this project and how a rich history documenting the first century of photography reveals new lines of inquiry for photographic history scholars.Click here to watch the video.
The Library of Congress celebrated the 1,000th issue of seminal DC comic book series, "Action Comics" and commemorated 80 years of Superman with an interview featuring personnel of DC Comics. Former publisher and president Paul Levitz joined DC writer and artist Dan Jurgens (known for his work on the Superman series "The Death of Superman") for a conversation about the history of superhero comics, the writers and artists who create comics and the legacy of the Superman character.Click here to watch the video.
Pianists Louis Lortie & Hlne Mercier perform the two-piano music of Arensky, Rachmaninoff and Medtner, alongside a four-hand work by Ravel. This concert celebrated the acquisition by the Library of Congress of the holograph manuscript of Rachmaninoff's Symphonic Dances for two pianos.Click here to watch the video.
Jason Farman will delivered a talk entitled "Marks of Uncertainty: Bodily Traces and Temporality in Message Exchange."Click here to watch the video.
Walter Frisch speaks about the music of Arnold Schoenberg and Milton Babbitt.Click here to watch the video.
Patricia A. Sullivan discussed Robert F. Kennedy, the law, and the struggle for racial justice, in conjunction with the Library's exhibition, "The Civil Rights Act of 1964: A Long Struggle for Freedom."Click here to watch the video.
Best-selling author Andr Aciman discusses his critically acclaimed novel, "Call Me By Your Name." Set in Italy during the 1980s, the novel and film follow the coming-of-age love story of 17-year-old Elio and 24-year-old graduate student Oliver.Click here to watch the video.
Singer-songwriter Dolly Parton discusses her Imagination Library children's literacy program and her new partnership with the Library of Congress.Click here to watch the video.
Anne McLean interviews composer and clarinetist Jrg Widmann and Sibbi Bernhardsson of the Pacifica Quartet.Click here to watch the video.
Kenneth Breisch discussed his book "American Libraries 1730-1950," which celebrates the history of library architecture in America, from ultra-modern buildings to classical temples of knowledge such as the Library's Jefferson Building, considered one of the most beautiful buildings in the United States.Click here to watch the video.
Sarah Cowan discusses the cut and sewn paintings of 1970s artist Howardena Pindell in the context of aesthetic debates engendered by the Black Arts Movement, the women's art movement and shifts in modernist criticism. Pindell's paintings used texture as a strategy for conveying her affinities for African culture, administrative and craft labor, feminine adornment and modernist art.Click here to watch the video.
Laura Benedetti of Georgetown University and Peter Lukehart of the National Gallery of Art discuss 16th Century Italian poet Torquato Tasso in a program co-sponsored by the Embassy of Italy and the Italian Cultural Institute in Washington.Click here to watch the video.
Author Amardeep Singh will discuss the past and present of Pakistani Sikhs as told through his travels in Sindh, Baluchistan, Pakistan Administered Kashmir, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa and Punjab.Click here to watch the video.
Carolyn Brown discussed her just-published book "Reading Lu Xun Through Carl Jung," which offers a unique approach to the short stories of the most famous modern Chinese writer, Lu Xun (1881-1936). Click here to watch the video.
Pedram Partovi discusses popular Iranian cinema before that country's Islamic revolution.Click here to watch the video.
The Huexotzinco Codex is part of the testimony in a legal case against representatives of the colonial government in Mexico by the Nahua people of Huexotzinco. Scholars consider the codex to be the first pictorial representation of the Madonna and Child in the New World. In this webinar, John Hessler examines the creation of the codex and its iconography.Click here to watch the video.
Shawn Harris read from his book "Her Right Foot," a story about the history and meaning of the Statue of Liberty. Afterwards, he lead students in a hands-on cut paper activity and shared his methods on creating collage art. Click here to watch the video.
As primitive life was becoming established on Earth, Gale Crater on Mars was a shallow lake filled with drinkable water and brimming with all of the chemical ingredients necessary for life to form. NASA's Scott Guzewich discusses the five-year effort to explore the remnants of this lake with the Curiosity rover. Click here to watch the video.
Larry Appelbaum of the Music Division interviews jazz scholar Ingrid Monson, discussing a wide range of topics including her background, her work at Harvard University, as well as her research and musical interests.Click here to watch the video.