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Library of Congress: New on the Web Site

Library of Congress: New on the Web Site

New features to the Library of Congress Web site, including new collections and content, as well as major modifications and upgrades.
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The Gazette of the United States, National Gazette and National Intelligencer are among the newspapers just added to Chronicling America, a free online database from the National Endowment for the Humanities and Library of Congress.Click here for more information.
The diaries of U.S. army officer George S. Patton (1885-1945) are part of a larger collection of Patton papers available for research use onsite at the Library of Congress. The entire collection spans the years 1807-1979, with the bulk of the papers concentrated from 1904 to 1945.Click here for more information.
Abel Buell’s New and Correct Map of the United States of North America is the first map of the newly independent United States compiled, printed and published in America by an American. This preview of Mapping a Growing Nation: From Independence to Statehood comprises maps of the northeastern United States. By year’s end, maps of all 50 states will be included in the online exhibition.Click here for more information.
The Library's popular Today in History website has received its first major redesign in nearly a dozen years. In addition to a streamlined look that allows easier navigation among Today in History’s hundreds of essays, the collection also offers an email alert service where you can subscribe and receive daily notices about the day’s featured items.Click here for more information.
The Library of Congress has recently placed online the diaries, notebooks and address books of John J. Pershing, commander-in-chief of the American Expeditionary Forces in World War I, and the diaries of George S. Patton, a tank commander in World War I and a U.S. Army general in World War II.Click here for more information.
September 15 to October 15 is National Hispanic Heritage Month. The Library of Congress, National Archives and Records Administration, National Endowment for the Humanities, National Gallery of Art, National Park Service, Smithsonian Institution and United States Holocaust Memorial Museum join in paying tribute to the generations of Hispanic Americans who have positively influenced and enriched our nation and society.Click here for more information.
The Montana Folklife Survey was conducted in the summer of 1979 by the American Folklife Center of the Library of Congress, in cooperation with the Montana Arts Council. The survey was a field research project to document traditional folklife in Montana. The collection consists of approximately 145 sound recordings, 10,500 photographs; and 3 ½ linear feet of manuscripts that document interviews with Montanans in various occupations including ranching, sheep herding, blacksmithing, stone cutting, saddle making, and mining; various folk and traditional music occasions; storytelling, and other documentation of rodeos, trade crafts, vernacular architecture, quilting, and other reminiscences and stories about life in Montana in 1979. This online presentation includes the majority of the sound recordings and photographs. Selected manuscripts include those materials created by the fieldworkers, the audio and photo logs, field notes, and final reports. The remainder of the collection is available in the Folklife Reading Room at the Library of Congress.Click here for more information.
The Library of Congress and the Galileo Museum in Florence, Italy, have unveiled a website that celebrates the life and times of 16th-century cartographer Martin Waldseemüller, who created the 1507 World Map, the first document to use the name "America," represent the Pacific Ocean and depict a separate and full Western Hemisphere.Click here for more information.
The Library of Congress unveiled today a new curated web presentation—"Food for Thought: Presidents, Prime Ministers, and other National Press Club Luncheon Speakers, 1954-1989"—that features speeches by 25 of the world’s most important newsmakers, including presidents, international leaders and other political and cultural icons of the period.Click here for more information.
The Library of Congress will launch a new home page at loc.gov on Tuesday, November 1, 2016.Click here for more information.
November is Native American Heritage Month. The Library of Congress, National Archives and Records Administration, National Endowment for the Humanities, National Gallery of Art, National Park Service, Smithsonian Institution and United States Holocaust Memorial Museum join in paying tribute to the rich ancestry and traditions of Native Americans. The site has been redesigned and upgraded, featuring new content for 2016, a new adaptive visual design, new/improved video player, etc.Click here for more information.
The Library of Congress has launched a new, dynamic and mobile-friendly home page, as well as many other sub-pages and collection display pages, in an effort to improve the look, access and ease of search of our online collections and content.Click here for more information.
The Veterans History Project (VHP) has launched "Art of War," the latest installment in its online "Experiencing War" website series.Click here for more information.
The Sigmund Freud Collection at the Library of Congress has been digitized and is now online. The collection, with more than 20,000 items, contains the personal papers of Sigmund Freud (1856-1939), the neurologist and founder of psychoanalysis whose ideas of the unconscious and theories on sex, repression, transference and religion profoundly influenced 20th-century Western thought. His theories still generate controversy.Click here for more information.
These documents, letters, telegrams, drawings and photo albums bear testament to the Totenberg family in Poland before and during the Holocaust and to Roman Totenberg’s unwavering efforts to rescue those left behind.Click here for more information.
This exhibition features baseball sheet music from the collections of the Library of Congress. Most of these works are original copyright deposits and represent only a small fraction of the more than 400 published songs about baseball in the Library’s custody. They illustrate the remarkable congruence between the evolution of the sport from before the Civil War to the present, and the musical counterparts that have chronicled in song baseball’s greatest moments.Click here to view the exhibition.
March is Women's History Month - The Library of Congress, National Archives and Records Administration, National Endowment for the Humanities, National Gallery of Art, National Park Service, Smithsonian Institution and United States Holocaust Memorial Museum join in commemorating and encouraging the study, observance and celebration of the vital role of women in American history.Click here for more information.
The Veterans History Project (VHP) today launched “PTSD: A Lasting Impact of War,” the latest installment in its online “Experiencing War” website series.Click here for more information.
The papers of Franklin Pierce (1804-1869), army officer, representative and senator from New Hampshire, and fourteenth president of the United States, contain approximately 2,350 items dating from 1820 to 1869. They include correspondence, a photostatic copy of a diary kept by Pierce while serving in the Mexican War, drafts of Pierce’s messages to Congress, and an engraved portrait. Pierce’s correspondence relates chiefly to his service in the Mexican War, public affairs, and national politics.Click here for more information.
The papers of Union soldier Samuel J. Gibson (1833-1878) consist of a diary kept by Gibson in 1864 while serving with Company B, 103rd Pennsylvania Infantry Regiment, and a letter to his wife while held as a prisoner at Camp Sumter in Georgia, the Confederate prisoner of war camp commonly known as Andersonville Prison. The diary documents the capture of the Federal garrison at Plymouth, North Carolina, in April 1864, and Gibson’s experiences as a prisoner of war at Andersonville, Georgia, and Florence, South Carolina. Gibson records war news and rumors received by the prisoners, the state of his physical and emotional health, the deaths of fellow prisoners, and the importance of his diary in maintaining a sense of time.Click here for more information.
The seven volumes of diaries and notebooks, 1793-1861, of Anna Maria Brodeau Thornton (ca.1775-1865) document her position at the center of a Washington, D.C., social circle that included George and Martha Washington, James and Dolley Madison, Thomas Jefferson, Margaret Bayard Smith and the cabinet members, congressmen and diplomats who constituted the city's entwined social and political worlds. Anna Maria Brodeau Thornton's papers consist of diaries and commonplace books, 1793-1861, which she began when she was 18 and ended at 86, a period of 68 years. These volumes document the operation of her household, including the management of slaves; travel, including visits to the Virginia homes of George and Martha Washington, Thomas Jefferson, and James and Dolley Madison; the construction of Washington, D.C., and the U.S. Capitol; the city under attack during the War of 1812; visits of the Count de Volney, 1796, and Alexander von Humboldt, 1804; an attempt on her life by Arthur, a slave, in 1835; the 1844 shipboard explosion that killed Secretary of State Abel Upshur and Treasury Secretary Thomas Gilmer; the inauguration of president James K. Polk in 1845; and the start of the Civil War.Click here for more information.
A preview of the Library of Congress' comprehensive exhibition set to open in the Thomas Jefferson Building in Washington, D.C., on April 4. Featuring the Library's unparalleled collections related to the conflict, "Echoes of the Great War: American Experiences of World War I" examines the upheaval of world war as Americans confronted it—both at home and abroad. Click here for more information.
World War I Primary Source set for classroom use. Includes Teacher's guide. Also available in Student Discovery Set format for iPad via Apple iBooks.Click here for more information.
Annual update with 2016 additions to Recording Registry. Includes audio montage.Click here for more information.
The Nation's Forum recordings were made between 1918 and 1920 in an effort to preserve the voices of prominent Americans; in most cases, they are the only surviving recordings of a speaker. The project originated with St. Louis attorney Guy Golterman (1879-1967), an active supporter of the opera and other performing arts. With the endorsement of the Department of State's Committee on Public Information -- a governmental propaganda ministry -- the Nation's Forum sought speakers, and the Columbia Graphophone Company pressed and distributed the recordings under the Nation's Forum label.Click here for more information.