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Library of Congress: News

Library of Congress: News

The latest news from the Library of Congress.
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News

Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden announced today the annual selection of 25 motion pictures that have been inducted into the National Film Registry of the Library of Congress because of their cultural, historic or aesthetic importance.  This year’s titles range from the Disney animated blockbuster “The Lion King” and the seminal coming-of-age drama “The Breakfast Club” to the 1990 documentary “Paris Is Burning,” chronicling the pageantry of drag balls in New York City, and a collection of home movies showcasing African-American life in Oklahoma during the 1920s.Click here for more information.
The 21st Poet Laureate Consultant in Poetry at the Library of Congress, Juan Felipe Herrera, has selected poet Ray Gonzalez for the 2017 Witter Bynner Fellowship.Click here for more information.
A new selection of 28 posters, prints, drawings and photographs is now on display in the ongoing Library of Congress exhibition “World War I: American Artists View the Great War.” Click here for more information.
The National Library Service for the Blind and Physically Handicapped (NLS), part of the Library of Congress, today released BARD Express, a Windows-based software program that will aid in the use of the NLS Braille and Audio Reading Download (BARD) service.Click here for more information.
Four distinguished scholars—David Bordwell, Timothy Breen, Jose Casanova and Wayne Wiegand—began residencies at the John W. Kluge Center at the Library of Congress on Jan. 9.Click here for more information.
Award-winning author and literacy advocate Stephen King helped the Library of Congress today launch its call for nominations for the 2017 Library of Congress Literacy Awards.Click here for more information.
Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden today announced that Jane Sánchez, the chief of Humanities and Social Sciences at the Library of Congress, has been named Law Librarian of Congress, effective Feb. 5.Click here for more information.
Paulette Marie Hasier has been appointed chief of the Geography and Map Division at the Library of Congress.Click here for more information.
The Library of Congress is seeking applications from current world history or world geography teachers for a Teacher-in-Residence position within its Educational Outreach division during the 2017-18 school year.Click here for more information.
The Library of Congress today announced the acquisition of the archives of Bob Adelman, one of the best-known photographers of the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s.Click here for more information.Watch a live announcement event on YouTube at 2 p.m. ET on March 20.
Grant Harris has been appointed chief of the European Division at the Library of Congress.Click here for more information.
Designed to educate, amuse, or advertise, pictorial maps were a clever and colorful component of print culture in the mid-20th century, often overlooked in studies of cartography. A new book published by the Library of Congress in association with the University of Chicago Press, “Picturing America: The Golden Age of Pictorial Maps,” by Stephen J. Hornsby, celebrates these vibrant maps, tracing their development and proliferation from the 1920s to the 1970s.Click here for more information.
Judy Garland’s hit single “Over The Rainbow”; the original-cast album of “The Wiz”; the rap group N.W.A’s seminal album, “Straight Outta Compton”; the Eagles’ 1976 “Their Greatest Hits”; and the national anthem of black America have been designated as aural treasures worthy of preservation as part of America’s patrimony. Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden today named these recordings and 20 other titles to the National Recording Registry of the Library of Congress because of their cultural, artistic and historical importance to American society and the nation’s audio heritage.Click here for more information.
The Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture and the Library of Congress today announced the joint acquisition of an album of 44 rare photographs, including a previously unrecorded portrait of abolitionist and Underground Railroad conductor Harriet Tubman and the only known photograph of John Willis Menard, the first African American man elected to the U.S. Congress.Click here for more information.
The Library of Congress today opens a major exhibition to commemorate the centennial of World War I. “Echoes of the Great War: American Experiences of World War I” tells the stories of Americans in the war, through correspondence, music, film, recorded sound, diaries, posters, photographs, scrapbooks, medals, maps and materials from the Veterans History Project.Click here for more information.
A new book exploring the history of the card catalog, that venerated chest of small drawers that contained the known universe, has been published by the Library of Congress in association with Chronicle Books.Click here for more information.
The Library of Congress is combining its two reading and writing programs for young people – A Book That Shaped Me and Letters About Literature. The move will enable the Library to better leverage its resources, to brand the programs more consistently and to encourage greater participation in these long-running programs.The Library today kicks off its annual summer contest, now titled A Book That Shaped Me: Letters About Literature. The program will still target rising 5th- and 6th-grade students and will be managed in collaboration with libraries in six states as in past years. Winners will be honored at the 2017 National Book Festival, which will take place Saturday, Sept. 2.Click here for more information.
The Federal Library and Information Network (FEDLINK) has announced the winners of its national awards for federal librarianship, which recognize the many innovative ways that federal libraries, librarians and library technicians fulfill the information demands of government, business, scholarly communities and the American public.Click here for more information.
The Library of Congress announced today that it is making 25 million records in its online catalog available for free bulk download in the largest release of digital records in the Library’s history.Click here for more information.
The National Library Service for the Blind and Physically Handicapped (NLS), part of the Library of Congress, has named the Washington Talking Book and Braille Library (WTBBL) of Seattle as the Network Library of the Year for 2016. Â Click here for more information.
The Library of Congress has placed online nearly 25,000 Sanborn Fire Insurance Maps, which depict the structure and use of buildings in U.S. cities and towns. Maps will be added monthly until 2020, for a total of approximately 500,000.Click here for more information.
The Library of Congress this week welcomed 37 undergraduate and graduate students to its highly competitive, Junior Fellows Summer Intern Program. From curating historic copyright material ,to helping develop new preservation techniques, making World War I veterans histories more accessible and exploring the creation of a digital scholar’s lab, the Junior Fellows will work on a wide range of special projects under the mentorship of Library staff during this 10-week paid summer experience.Click here for more information.
Several educators from across the nation have been selected to participate in five Library of Congress Teaching with Primary Sources Summer Teacher Institutes to take place from June through August.Click here for more information.
Letters About Literature, a Library of Congress national reading- and writing-promotion program, has announced its winners for 2017. The program, now in its 25th year, asks young people in grades 4 through 12 to write to an author (living or deceased) about how his or her book affected their lives.Click here for more information.
The Library of Congress today announced two new born-digital collections are now available on loc.gov – the Webcomics Web Archive and the Web Cultures Web Archive.Click here for more information.